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contract
used in a sentence

3 meanings
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1  —as in:
legal contract
Definition an agreement - typically written and enforceable by law
  • She signed the contract.
contract = a written agreement that is enforceable by law
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • A lot of people get into trouble by signing contracts they don't understand.
  • contracts = written agreements that are enforceable by law
  • In rare instances, a consumer can cancel a signed contract during a "cooling off" period, but this is limited to a situation where a door-to-door salesperson dropped in uninvited. In that instance, the "cooling off" period lasts three days.
  • Time presses, and in our implied agreement with the old scytheman it is of the essence of the contract.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • contract = agreement
  • My contract provides I be supplied with all my firewood.
    Arthur Miller  --  The Crucible
  • contract = formal legal agreement
  • I thought she was going to spit in it, which was the only reason anybody in Maycomb held out his hand: it was a time-honored method of sealing oral contracts.
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • contracts = agreements
  • In 1961, a Fairbanks company, Yutan Construction, won a contract from the new state of Alaska (statehood having been granted just two years earlier) to upgrade the trail, building it into a road on which trucks could haul ore from the mine year-round.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • contract = formal legal agreement
  • All our contracts are oral, but we deliver what we promise.
    V.S. Naipaul  --  A Bend in the River
  • contracts = agreements
  • Couldn't sign a contract because I was underage, and my momma, your grandma, wouldn't sign for me.
    Robert Lipsyte  --  The Contender
  • contract = a written agreement that is enforceable by law
  • according to the terms of the contract
    James Joyce  --  Dubliners
contract = formally written agreement

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
contract the disease
Definition to get — especially in reference to a disease
  • She contracted an STD (sexually transmitted disease).
contracted = acquired (gotten; or picked up)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She contracted AIDS by sharing needles.
  • contracted = caught or got — especially in reference to a disease
  • ...the habits contracted at your age are generally indelible... It is therefore highly important that you should endeavor not only to be learned but virtuous.
    George Washington (in a letter to his nephew)
  • Here is a secret about my family: My sister contracted the deliria a several months before her scheduled procedure.
    Lauren Oliver  --  Delirium
  • contracted = got (a disease)
  • I contracted pleural pneumonia, in that day a killing disease.
    John Steinbeck  --  East of Eden
  • contracted = got (became ill with)
  • We had to sit so close to other people there wasn't room to breathe, if you even wanted to, being in the position to contract every kind of a germ there was.
    Barbara Kingsolver  --  The Poisonwood Bible
  • contract = to get (of a disease)
  • Besides that, our potatoes have contracted such strange diseases that one out of every two buckets of pommes de terre winds up in the garbage.
    Anne Frank  --  The Diary of a Young Girl
  • contracted = got (a disease)
  • It's not his fault I've changed—seen the light or contracted the deliria, depending on who you ask.
    Lauren Oliver  --  Delirium
  • If you fear that you or someone you know may have contracted deliria, please call the emergency line toll-free at 1-800-PREVENT to discuss immediate intake and treatment.
    Lauren Oliver  --  Delirium
  • In the decades before the development of the cure, the disease had become so virulent and widespread it was extraordinarily rare for a person to reach adulthood without having contracted a significant case of amor deliria nervosa.
    Lauren Oliver  --  Delirium

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
the metal contracted
Definition when something gets shorter or smaller
  • When it is cold, the bridge contracts and the joints are further apart.
contracts = gets shorter or smaller
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The muscle is contracted because of the pain.
  • contracted = pulled tighter or shorter
  • an arrhythmic expansion and contraction of my feelings
  • Lord Godalming's brows contracted, and he stood up and walked about the room.
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • contracted = pulled toward each other
  • The little brunette contracts her brows when she is thinking; but when she talks they are still.
    Erich Maria Remarque  --  All Quiet on the Western Front
  • contracts = pulls tighter (muscles shorten)
  • Little Chuck's face contracted and he said gently, "You mean him, ma'am?"
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • contracted = pulled back
  • There was a popping sound and a putrid odor, as her pustules contracted and burst open.
    Henry H. Neff  --  The Fiend And The Forge
  • contracted = pulled back (got shorter or smaller)
  • It had merely become distasteful; not enough to force a decision; not enough to make him clench his fists; just enough to contract his nostrils.
    Ayn Rand  --  The Fountainhead
  • contract = make smaller
  • His hands are clasped on top of his head and I can see the muscles in his back contracting from labored breaths.
    Colleen Hoover  --  Hopeless
  • contracting = pulling shorter or tighter
  • His stomach contracted.
    John Steinbeck  --  East of Eden
contracted = cramped (tightened as the muscles shortened)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
Less commonly:
Contract can be used as a verb, as in They contracted to.... When used as a verb, the second syllable is stressed. A grammatical sense of the word describes can`t as a contraction of can not. Other specialized usages include contract murder and contract bridge.
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