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cogent
used in a sentence

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Definition powerfully persuasive
  • It is difficult to decide because both sides offer cogent arguments.
cogent = powerfully persuasive
  • He makes a cogent argument, but the premises are flawed.
  • Or does my friend think that by aspersing a witness for the prosecution he will shake the evidence, the abundant and cogent evidence, against his client?
    Albert Camus  --  The Stranger
  • cogent = powerfully persuasive
  • He has dealt profoundly with the disaster that has overwhelmed our native tribal society, and has argued cogently the case of our own complicity in this disaster.
    Alan Paton  --  Cry, the Beloved Country
  • cogently = in a logical manner that is powerful and persuasive
  • McMullen came out of Japan racked by nightmares and so nervous that he was barely able to speak cogently.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • I'm out of anything that passes for a cogent argument, so I come back with the first thing that pops into my head.
    Rick Yancey  --  The 5th Wave
  • There are yet other and more cogent reasons which prevent any great change from being easily effected in the principles of a democratic people.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 2
  • But listening to her cogently mapping out what we needed to indict, a tantalizing thought took hold of me.
    James Patterson  --  1st to Die
  • Were the ends of nature so great and cogent, as to exact this immense sacrifice of men?
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • The more dilapidated the buildings and the filthier the streets, the more cogent were the directions.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Ultimatum
  • As a defiant statement of poetry's gift for telling truth but telling it slant, this is both cogent and corrective.
    Seamus Heaney  --  Crediting Poetry
  • But the last term of the definition is still more cogent, as coupled with the first.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • But from the time that a judge has refused to apply any given law in a case, that law loses a portion of its moral cogency.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1
  • Among other illustrations of its truth which might be cited, Scotland will furnish a cogent example.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers
  • She looked at Clyde so tensely, so urgently, that he felt quite shaken by the force of the cogency of the request.
    Theodore Dreiser  --  An American Tragedy
  • Caesar gave way before such cogent reasoning, and the cardinals were consequently invited to dinner.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • What you say sounds good, and it would be difficult to And any truly cogent objection.
    Thomas Mann  --  The Magic Mountain
  • He had a mind that worked in cogent and predictable ways but he brought to his argument a profound integrity, a total commitment to his belief in Pig's guilt.
    Pat Conroy  --  The Lords of Discipline
  • I grasped how others came to the matter at hand directly, and who made a set of arguments succinctly and cogently.
    Nelson Mandela  --  Long Walk to Freedom
  • Mr. Gradgrind did not seem favourably impressed by these cogent remarks.
    Charles Dickens  --  Hard Times

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