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bravado
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Definition a show of courage — especially intentionally shown to intimidate or earn admiration
  • tough soldiers with plenty of bravado
bravado = a show of courage — especially intentionally shown to intimidate or earn admiration
  • a show of bravado I didn't feel
  • a trace of bravado in her stance
  • There was no longer any deceit or bravado in the manner of the accused.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • In a moment of bravado, just before she goes, Anybodys spits-but cautiously.
    Arthur Laurents and Stephen Sondheim  --  Westside Story
  • bravado = a show of courage — especially intentionally shown to intimidate or earn admiration
  • "—these walls are solidly put together;" and here, through the mere phrenzy of bravado, I rapped heavily, with a cane which I held in my hand, upon that very portion of the brick-work behind which stood the corpse of the wife of my bosom.
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Black Cat
  • bravado = a show of courage
  • In a fit of blind bravado, I shoved the torch forward as far as my arm would reach.
    Farley Mowat  --  Never Cry Wolf
  • The other is putting on a show of bravado.
    Walter Dean Myers  --  Monster
  • Get thy wounds healed, purvey thee a better horse, and it may be I will hold it worth my while to scourge out of thee this boyish spirit of bravado.
    Sir Walter Scott  --  Ivanhoe
  • And this the wind does not out of bravado Or in a senseless rage, But so that in its desolation It may find words to fashion a lullaby for you.
    Boris Pasternak  --  Doctor Zhivago
  • "There she breaches! there she breaches!" was the cry, as in his immeasurable bravadoes the White Whale tossed himself salmon-like to Heaven.
    Herman Melville  --  Moby Dick
  • She was sure of herself, with a serenity of confidence which made Rosalind's self-reliance seem almost bravado.
    John Wyndham  --  The Chrysalids
  • Yet despite his bravado, Frederic knew at once that he would put on the amulet.
    Orson Scott Card  --  Red Prophet
  • The viceroy, however, begged him earnestly not to hang them, as their behaviour savoured rather of madness than of bravado.
    Miguel de Cervantes  --  Don Quixote
  • There was no longer any deceit or bravado in the manner of the accused.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • His stoic bravado had been replaced by this odd plea to the forest.
    Ted Dekker  --  White: The Great Pursuit
  • But one-man cars get into less trouble because you reduce bravado.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  Blink
  • He was pale now, his bravado gone; his hands, clenched into fists, were white at the knuckles.
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Fallen Angels
  • The bravado was wearing off.
    Stephenie Meyer  --  Twilight
  • As they walked into the elevator Amory considered a piece of bravado—yielded finally.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald  --  This Side of Paradise

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