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braggadocio
used in a sentence

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Definition vain and empty boasting; or a person boasts in that way
  • the empty braggadocio of overconfidence and inexperience
  • ...not knowing if he was dealing with an arrogant braggadocio or a supernatural being.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • Here in Gibraltar he corners these educated British officers and badgers them with braggadocio about America and the wonders she can perform.
    Mark Twain  --  The Innocents Abroad
  • A slight exaggeration, a bit of braggadocio, Naphta replied.
    Thomas Mann  --  The Magic Mountain
  • He was not a braggadocio.
    Don DeLillo  --  Underworld
  • Braggadocio is an emotion which I have never been able to tolerate — not even in wolves.
    Farley Mowat  --  Never Cry Wolf
  • He looks like a rock star, but he has none of a rock star's swagger and braggadocio and staginess.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  Blink
  • That story shows about the time when Nolan's braggadocio must have broken down.
    Edward E. Hale  --  The Man Without a Country
  • Men were always lying about women; she would put it down as the braggadocio of a callow boy smitten by her beauty.
    George R.R. Martin  --  A Feast For Crows
  • He could not endure his airs as a man of fashion, and laughed heartily at his pompous braggadocio stories.
    William Makepeace Thackeray  --  Vanity Fair
  • "Pistols, then, at eight o'clock, in the Bois de Vincennes," said Beauchamp, quite disconcerted, not knowing if he was dealing with an arrogant braggadocio or a supernatural being.
    Alexandre Dumas  --  The Count of Monte Cristo
  • Besides its own ways of pronouncing Southern English, Texas talk has another unique characteristic: it glories in wild metaphors and exaggerated similes, with a dash of braggadocio.
    Robert MacNeil and William Crane  --  Do You Speak American?
  • With white people 't is different, for they've a nat'ral avarsion to being scalped; whereas your Indian shaves his head in readiness for the knife, and leaves a lock of hair by way of braggadocio, that one can lay hold of in the bargain."
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Deerslayer
  • And he was not fleshier either; your grandfather said that was not it: it was just that the flesh on his bones had become quieter, as though passive after some actual breasting of atmosphere like in running, so that he actually filled his clothes now, with that quality still swaggering but without braggadocio or belligerence, though according to your grandfather the quality had never been belligerence, only watchfulness.
    William Faulkner  --  Absalom, Absalom!
  • Moreover, there was in all these words of Thenardier, in his accent, in his gesture, in his glance which darted flames at every word, there was, in this explosion of an evil nature disclosing everything, in that mixture of braggadocio and abjectness, of pride and pettiness, of rage and folly, in that chaos of real griefs and false sentiments, in that immodesty of a malicious man tasting the voluptuous delights of violence, in that shameless nudity of a repulsive soul, in that...
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables

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