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appropriate

used in a sentence
3 meanings
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1  —as in:
it is appropriate
Definition suitable (fitting) for a particular situation
  • These clothes aren't appropriate for work.
appropriate = suitable (fitting)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The movie is not appropriate for young children.
  • appropriate = suitable (fitting)
  • We disagree about what is appropriate.
  • appropriate = suitable (fitting)
  • Her behavior was inappropriate.
  • inappropriate = not suitable
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in inappropriate means not and reverses the meaning of appropriate. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • The old lesson plan was not developmentally appropriate.
  • appropriate = suitable (fitting)
  • Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
    United States 'Founding Fathers'  --  The Constitution of the United States
  • appropriate = suitable
  • For such things your education is appropriate and mine non-existent.
    Mark Helprin  --  A Soldier of the Great War
  • appropriate = suitable (fitting)
  • All they want me to do is dress and behave appropriately and not embarrass them.
    Kenneth Oppel  --  Airborn
  • appropriately = in a suitable (fitting) manner for a particular situation
  • I was making far more eye contact than was appropriate.
    Randy Pausch  --  The Last Lecture
  • appropriate = suitable (fitting) for a particular situation
  • It's an expensive clan to run with; outfits must be coordinated, crisp, and seasonally appropriate.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Speak
appropriate = suitable (fitting)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
appropriate from their culture
Definition to take without asking — often without right
  • The invading army appropriated the home to use as a local headquarters.
appropriated = took without asking
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Accusations of racism and cultural appropriation were immediate when the white chef opened what she described as a "clean" Chinese restaurant.
  • appropriation = taking
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • She appropriated my idea as her own.
  • appropriated = took
  • She appropriated my coffee as she ran to the meeting.
  • appropriated = took without asking
  • She writes about situations in which members of a dominant culture appropriate elements from a disadvantaged minority culture.
  • appropriate = take
  • Whenever one of them made a move she had never seen before, she quickly appropriated it—imagined it as part of her own repertoire.
    Frank Beddor  --  The Looking Glass Wars
  • appropriated = took
  • She wears a long woolen coat, no doubt something the girls have appropriated from the Canada with no objection from the SS.
    Heather Morris  --  The Tattooist of Auschwitz
  • appropriated = taken
  • Lord Ravenshaw and the duke had appropriated the only two characters worth playing before I reached Ecclesford; and though Lord Ravenshaw offered to resign his to me, it was impossible to take it, you know.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • appropriated = taken
  • In practice this means that she appropriates the MEAT LIKE YOU LIKE IT sign and incorporates it into one of her constructions,
    Margaret Atwood  --  Cat's Eye
  • appropriates = takes without asking
  • The deputy director seemed very good at appropriating everything that K. was now forced to give up!
    Franz Kafka  --  The Trial
appropriating = taking

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
Congress will appropriate funds
Definition to set aside for a particular use
  • The money has been appropriated, but it hasn't yet been spent.
appropriated = set aside for a particular use
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She is on the powerful Appropriations Committee.
  • Appropriations Committee = congressional committee responsible for passing legislation that designates how discretionary funds should be spent
  • Congress appropriated additional funds for airport improvement.
  • appropriated = set aside
  • Money is appropriated for a two-year budget cycle during odd-numbered years.
  • appropriated = set aside for particular purposes
  • I cannot describe the delight I felt when I learned the ideas appropriated to each of these sounds and was able to pronounce them.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • appropriated = assigned
  • Taught by experience that proper dependence could not be placed on the success of requisitions, unable by its own authority to lay hold of fresh resources, and urged by considerations of national danger, would it not be driven to the expedient of diverting the funds already appropriated from their proper objects to the defense of the State?
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers
  • appropriated = budgeted
  • Appropriations for Sardaukar training went down steadily in the final thirty years before the Arrakis Revolt.
    Frank Herbert  --  Dune
  • appropriations = budget
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
  • The man flipped through a notebook that listed miscellaneous military appropriations.
    Greg Mortenson & David Oliver Relin  --  Three Cups of Tea
  • appropriations = money budgeted for a particular use
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
  • The furor over the treaty would continue until the House took up the necessary appropriations the following year.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • appropriations = funding
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)
  • I shall ask this Congress for greatly increased new appropriations and authorizations to carry on what we have begun.
    Franklin  Delano  Roosevelt  --  The Four Freedoms
appropriations = funding
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tions", converts a verb into a plural noun that denotes results of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in actions, illustrations, and observations.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
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