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apprehend

used in a sentence
3 meanings
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1  —as in:
apprehend the situation
Definition to understand or perceive (see or become aware of)
  • She doesn't yet apprehend the seriousness of the charge against her.
apprehend = understand
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • It defines intelligence as "the ability to apprehend the interrelationships of presented facts in such a way as to guide action toward a desired goal."
  • apprehend = understand
  • How will the first truly intelligent machine apprehend the world?
  • apprehend = understand
  • This did not at all satisfy him, for he said quickly, "But I fear, Dr. Seward, that you hardly apprehend my wish."
    Bram Stoker  --  Dracula
  • apprehend = understand
  • Can you apprehend these outside forces?
    John Green  --  Turtles All the Way Down
  • apprehend = understand
  • I am glad to hear Bertram will be so well off. ... I apprehend he will not have less than seven hundred a year.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • apprehend = understand
  • Their stillness is the reason why these memories of former times do not awaken desire so much as sorrow—a vast, inapprehensible melancholy.
    Erich Maria Remarque  --  All Quiet on the Western Front
  • inapprehensible = not capable of being understood
    (Editor's note:  The prefix "in-" in inapprehensible means not and reverses the meaning of apprehensible. This is the same pattern you see in words like invisible, incomplete, and insecure.)
  • Suddenly the element of life became distinguishable, as apprehensible as electric currents, air and water, desire for happiness, earth, sky.
    Boris Pasternak  --  Doctor Zhivago
  • apprehensible = able to be perceived
  • Even death, Alessandro thought, would yield to beauty-if not in fact then in explanation-for the likeness of every great question could be found in forms as simple as songs, and there, if not explicable, they were at least perfectly apprehensible.
    Mark Helprin  --  A Soldier of the Great War
  • apprehensible = understandable
  • Was this affirmation apprehended by Bloom?
    James Joyce  --  Ulysses
apprehended = understood

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
apprehend the criminal
Definition to capture and arrest someone suspected of breaking the law
  • Police are determined to apprehend the murderer.
apprehend = catch and arrest
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • They apprehended the suspect late last night.
  • apprehended = caught and arrested
  • Why had they apprehended Tate?
    Delia Owens  --  Where the Crawdads Sing
  • apprehended = caught or arrested
  •   Condemned villain, I do apprehend thee;
      Obey, and go with me; for thou must die.
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • apprehend = capture a wrongdoer
  • Considering we've got nothing better to work with, I intend to tell Chief Deacon that the Mother Paula's vandal has been apprehended.
    Carl Hiassen  --  Hoot
  • apprehended = caught
  • The culprit is far too cunning to be apprehended for this dastardly deed.
    Ellen Raskin  --  The Westing Game
  • apprehended = caught
  • Mr Squeers, still half stunned, was hurried off with a stolen deed in his possession, and Mrs Sliderskew was apprehended likewise.
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
  • apprehended = arrested
  •   I do defy thy conjurations,
      And apprehend thee for a felon here.
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • apprehend = catch and arrest
  • The culprit is far too cunning to be apprehended for this dastardly deed.
    Ellen Raskin  --  The Westing Game
  • apprehended = captured or arrested
  • This morning they had not expected to locate and apprehend him.
    Stieg Larsson  --  The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest
apprehend = arrest

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
3  —as in:
apprehend misfortune
Definition fear, or anticipate with worry
  • It can be worse to apprehend than to suffer.
apprehend = fear, or anticipate with worry
(editor's note:  This is commonly seen in the forms apprehensive or apprehension, but it is also seen in this form in classic literature.)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • I hope it is better than we apprehend.
  • apprehend = fear, or anticipate with worry (commonly only seen in the forms apprehensive or apprehension, but seen in this form in classic literature)
    (editor's note:  This is commonly seen in the forms apprehensive or apprehension, but it is also seen in this form in classic literature.)
  • We shall greatly miss Edmund in our small circle, but I trust and hope he will find the poor invalid in a less alarming state than might be apprehended, and that he will be able to bring him to Mansfield shortly,
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • apprehended = feared
  • Mrs. R. knows a decline is apprehended;
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • apprehended = feared
  • In every other respect, in looking around her, or penetrating forward, she saw more to distrust and to apprehend.
    Jane Austen  --  Persuasion
  • apprehend = fear
    (editor's note:  This is commonly seen in the forms apprehensive or apprehension, but it is also seen in this form in classic literature.)
  • I trembled violently, apprehending some dreadful misfortune.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • apprehending = fearing
  • With his heart beating violently, and apprehending he knew not what disaster, Nicholas returned to where he had left Smike.
    Charles Dickens  --  Nicholas Nickleby
  • apprehending = fearing
  • Is the danger you apprehended last night gone by now, sir?
    Charlotte Bronte  --  Jane Eyre
  • apprehended = feared
  • Steerforth not yet appearing, which induced me to apprehend that he must be ill, I left the Commons early on the third day, and walked out to Highgate.
    Charles Dickens  --  David Copperfield
  • apprehend = fear
    (editor's note:  This is commonly seen in the forms apprehensive or apprehension, but it is also seen in this form in classic literature.)
  • The wills thrust westward ahead of them, and fears that had once apprehended drought or flood now lingered with anything that might stop the westward crawling.
    John Steinbeck  --  The Grapes of Wrath
apprehended = worried about

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
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