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aggravate

used in a sentence
2 meanings
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1  —as in:
she aggravates me
Definition annoy or irritate
  • She is the most aggravating person I know.
aggravating = annoying
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • She sees the bad side of everything and is aggravated by cheerful people.
  • aggravated = annoyed or irritated
  • ...he could really be aggravating sometimes.
    J.D. Salinger  --  The Catcher in the Rye
  • aggravating = annoying (irritating)
  • Scout, don't let Aunty aggravate you.
    Harper Lee  --  To Kill a Mockingbird
  • aggravate = annoy or irritate
  • In a moment of selfishness, she finds herself aggravated by it, because things are going so well for her now.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • aggravated = annoyed or irritated
  • I'm smiling at you even though you're aggravating me.
    Suzanne Collins  --  The Hunger Games
  • aggravating = annoying or irritating
  • You're peculiar, you're aggravating, yet you're easy to forgive.
    Ray Bradbury  --  Fahrenheit 451
  • aggravating = annoying or irritating
  • But there was a way to avoid such aggravation: He could simply abandon the Datsun and resume his odyssey on foot.
    Jon Krakauer  --  Into the Wild
  • aggravation = annoyance or irritation
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • She possessed the unique ability to aggravate almost anyone she ever met.
    Markus Zusak  --  The Book Thief
  • aggravate = irritate or annoy
  • Such a look of reproach at Edmund from his father she could never have expected to witness; and to feel that it was in any degree deserved was an aggravation indeed.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
aggravation = something that is disturbing
(editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —as in:
aggravated his illness
Definition make worse
  • The offense is aggravated by...
aggravated = make worse
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • The drug aggravates the pain.
  • aggravates = makes worse
  • Under any circumstances it would have been an unwelcome alliance; but to have it so clandestinely formed, and such a period chosen for its completion, placed Julia's feelings in a most unfavourable light, and severely aggravated the folly of her choice.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • aggravated = made worse
  • It was to be decided whether the result of my curiosity and lawless devices would cause the death of two of my fellow beings: one a smiling babe full of innocence and joy, the other far more dreadfully murdered, with every aggravation of infamy that could make the murder memorable in horror.
    Mary Shelley  --  Frankenstein
  • aggravation = thing that makes something worse
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Gus always managed to aggravate whatever situation he was in with a woman.
    Larry McMurtry  --  Lonesome Dove
  • aggravate = make worse
  • You may not have heard of the last blow—Julia's elopement; she is gone to Scotland with Yates.  She left London a few hours before we entered it. At any other time this would have been felt dreadfully. Now it seems nothing; yet it is an heavy aggravation.
    Jane Austen  --  Mansfield Park
  • aggravation = something making the situation worse
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Must I say more to aggravate thy rage?
    Sophocles  --  Oedipus The King
  • I felt that to obtrude my consolations on her then would only serve to aggravate her sufferings.
    Bronte, Anne  --  The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
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