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aggrandize
used in a sentence

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Definition make greater in size, scope, or reputation
  • They made up the story to aggrandize the threat.
aggrandize = make greater in size, scope, or reputation
  • She is not given to self-aggrandizement.
  • If the aim was the aggrandizement of France, that might have been attained without the Revolution and without the Empire.
    Leo Tolstoy  --  War and Peace
  • Anyway, I know it's a bit self-aggrandizing.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • I couldn't have done it without you would not work; it sounded both self-aggrandizing and condescending.
    Dave Eggers  --  The Circle
  • We have seen that the tendency of republican governments is to an aggrandizement of the legislative at the expense of the other departments.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers
  • I had never dreamed that anyone would accept me so simply, so completely, without question or the least hint of personal aggrandizement.
    Richard Wright  --  Black Boy
  • But these extravagant numbers were surely a form of self-aggrandizement, and reckless to the point of irresponsibility.
    Ian McEwan  --  Atonement
  • Isolation aggrandizes everything.
    Victor Hugo  --  The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • Mr. Rife, what's your opinion of the people who say you're just doing this as a self-aggrandizing publicity stunt?
    Neal Stephenson  --  Snow Crash
  • The aggrandizement which they have brought to the nineteenth century has not Waterloo as its source.
    Victor Hugo  --  Les Miserables
  • Alexander the Sixth, in wishing to aggrandize the duke, his son, had many immediate and prospective difficulties.
    Nicolo Machiavelli  --  The Prince
  • They would not pay their requisitions to advance their plans for personal aggrandizement.
    Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, & John Jay  --  The Federalist Papers — Modern English Edition 2
  • The retaining of it represented, on the other hand, an impulse to egocentric self-aggrandizement.
    Joseph Campbell  --  The Hero With a Thousand Faces
  • Or lastly (which experience seems to make probable), have we a satisfaction in aggrandizing our families, even though we have not the least love or respect for them?
    Henry Fielding  --  Tom Jones
  • And this spectacular ancient aggrandizement with its remains of art and many noble signs I could appreciate even if I didn't want to be just borne down by the grandeur of it.
    Saul Bellow  --  The Adventures of Augie March
  • This treatment had led to his becoming a sort of regrater of other men's gallantries, to his own aggrandizement as a Corinthian, rather than to the moral profit of his hearers.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Far from the Madding Crowd
  • His childish idea was, in fact, a pushing to the extremity of mathematical precision what is everywhere known as Grimm's Law—an aggrandizement of rough rules to ideal completeness.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Jude the Obscure
  • Nabby, appraising the politicians she encountered in New York, including Governor George Clinton, surmised there were few for whom personal aggrandizement was not the guiding motivation.
    David McCullough  --  John Adams
  • In these small communities, which are never agitated by the desire of aggrandizement or the cares of self-defence, all public authority and private energy is employed in internal amelioration.
    Alexis de Toqueville  --  Democracy In America, Volume 1

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