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affront
used in a sentence

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Definition an intentional insult; or to intentionally insult

Much more rarely, but sometimes seen in classic literature, affront can refer to any face-to-face exchange — especially one involving a candid or controversial conversation.
  • She considered anything but the very best manners to be an affront to her dignity.
affront = intentional insult
  • Words without deeds is an affront to the principle that guides our Nation and makes a mockery of the values we as public servants claim to love.
    Jon Corzine
  • We'll take these fellows to the tavern and affront them with t'other couple, and I reckon we'll find out SOMETHING before we get through.
    Mark Twain  --  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • affront = create a confrontational face-to-face exchange
  • It was an affront, a deprivation, to herself and to the world.
    Dave Eggers  --  The Circle
  • Always this was an affront to black men, one of the many affronts that white men apparently could not perceive.
    John Howard Griffin  --  Black Like Me
  • The totalitarian world finds even symbols of love and of worship an affront.
    Ronald Reagan  --  Tear Down This Wall Speech
  • "I see," says Emma, sounding a bit affronted.
    Sophie Kinsella  --  Confessoins of a Shopaholic
  • My thoughts of you are quite cold, except when you affront me.
    Thomas Hardy  --  Tess of the d'Urbervilles
  • [An affront to racial purity.
    Anne Frank  --  The Diary of a Young Girl
  • But she disliked the place, which affronted and almost frightened her; not for the world would she have spent a night there.
    Henry James  --  The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 2
  • "That you should even question their accuracy is an affront, madame," replied the Jackal coldly.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Ultimatum
  • "I'm sweet," she said, affronted, and holding back his license.
    Rainbow Rowell  --  Eleanor & Park
  • At least they too were covered in grease smudges, completing the affront.
    Marissa Meyer  --  Cinder
  • Unless another, As like Hermione as is her picture, Affront his eye.
    William Shakespeare  --  The Winter's Tale
  • You should ha' thought twice before you affronted to extremes a man who had nothing to lose.
    Thomas Hardy  --  The Mayor of Casterbridge
  • "I don't think I should; he gi'n the skin, and I didn't feel a hard thought, though Squire Doolittle got some affronted."
    James Fenimore Cooper  --  The Pioneers
  • Which would be an affront to Captain Nemo, since he hates to slay harmless beasts needlessly.
    Jules Verne  --  Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
  • Freud said that both Darwin's theory of evolution and his own psychoanalysis had resulted in an affront to mankind's naive egoism.
    Jostein Gaarder  --  Sophie's World
  • How incongruous is it to government, that a man shall be punished for drunkenness, and yet have liberty to affront, and even deny the Majesty of heaven?
    Daniel Defoe  --  Robinson Crusoe
  • There's a part of me that feels as if I should be deeply affronted on behalf of chess players everywhere.
    Rick Yancey  --  The Infinite Sea

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