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adulterate
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Definition corrupt, debase, or make impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance
  • adulterate the sample
  • I don't like my crème brûlée adulterated, because then you can't taste through to the quality of the ingredients.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  Blink
  • adulterated = corrupted, debased, or made impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance
  • As no one makes any profit by the sale, there is no longer any stimulus to extravagance, and no misrepresentation; no cheating, no adulteration or imitation, no bribery or 'grafting.'
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • adulteration = lowering the quality of something by adding something else to it
  • He was in the same plight as the manufacturer who has to adulterate and misrepresent his product.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Of course, imitation and adulteration are the essence of competition—they are but another form of the phrase 'to buy in the cheapest market and sell in the dearest.'
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • When the children were not well at home, Teta Elzbieta would gather herbs and cure them; now she was obliged to go to the drugstore and buy extracts—and how was she to know that they were all adulterated?
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Consider all the waste incidental to the manufacture of cheap qualities of goods, of goods made to sell and deceive the ignorant; consider the wastes of adulteration,—the shoddy clothing, the cotton blankets, the unstable tenements, the ground-cork life-preservers, the adulterated milk, the aniline soda water, the potato-flour sausages—
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Consider all the waste incidental to the manufacture of cheap qualities of goods, of goods made to sell and deceive the ignorant; consider the wastes of adulteration,—the shoddy clothing, the cotton blankets, the unstable tenements, the ground-cork life-preservers, the adulterated milk, the aniline soda water, the potato-flour sausages—
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • On one side of the room were the hoppers, into which men shoveled loads of meat and wheelbarrows full of spices; in these great bowls were whirling knives that made two thousand revolutions a minute, and when the meat was ground fine and adulterated with potato flour, and well mixed with water, it was forced to the stuffing machines on the other side of the room.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • A government official has stated that the nation suffers a loss of a billion and a quarter dollars a year through adulterated foods; which means, of course, not only materials wasted that might have been useful outside of the human stomach, but doctors and nurses for people who would otherwise have been well, and undertakers for the whole human race ten or twenty years before the proper time.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • ...and the same with any other man or woman who had a means of getting "graft," and was willing to pay over a share of it: the green-goods man and the highwayman, the pickpocket and the sneak thief, and the receiver of stolen goods, the seller of adulterated milk, of stale fruit and diseased meat, the proprietor of unsanitary tenements, the fake doctor and the usurer, the beggar and the "pushcart man," the prize fighter and the professional slugger, the race-track "tout," the procurer,...
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Perhaps he could not tell his greatness from ungreat-ness and so mixed them together that what was adulterated was lost.
    Robert Penn Warren  --  All the King's Men
  • Always, it would have to be complicated—adulterated—by his unwanted fame as one of the flagraisers.
    James Bradley  --  Flags of Our Fathers
  • Cuba had food rationing and allotments of coffee adulterated with ground peas, but no starvation, no enforced malnutrition.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Mountains Beyond Mountains
  • And Mrs. Lynde says you can never be sure of getting good baking powder nowadays when everything is so adulterated.
    Lucy Maud Montgomery  --  Anne Of Green Gables
  • Crome, I thought, looked at him with a tinge of dislike adulterating the usual calm superiority.
    Agatha Christie  --  The ABC Murders
  • We seek our friend not sacredly but with an adulterate passion which would appropriate him to ourselves.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson  --  Selected Essays
  • Yet how painful to be recalled, to be mitigated, to have one's self adulterated, mixed up, become part of another.
    Virginia Woolf  --  The Waves
  • If the car hadn't been adulterated for the mysterious and missing goats, it would hold thirty-two horses.
    Sara Gruen  --  Water for Elephants
  • And on all of them that want to adulterate the pure white blood of the South.
    Tennessee Williams  --  A Streetcar Named Desire

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