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adulterate

used in a sentence
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Definition corrupt, debase, or make impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance
  • Heroine is often adulterated with other chemicals that add to the overdose risk.
adulterated = made impure by adding a foreign substance
  • I need the unadulterated truth.
  • unadulterated = complete or pure
    (editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unadulterated means not and reverses the meaning of adulterated. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • This honey is adulterated.
  • adulterated = not pure
  • The unadulterated honey is thicker and less sticky.
  • unadulterated = pure
    (editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unadulterated means not and reverses the meaning of adulterated. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • But here I was now, less than fifty feet from them, telling myself that the sudden taste in my mouth wasn't unadulterated, naked fear.
    Khaled Hosseini  --  The Kite Runner
  • unadulterated = pure
    (editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unadulterated means not and reverses the meaning of adulterated. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • Cuba had food rationing and allotments of coffee adulterated with ground peas, but no starvation, no enforced malnutrition.
    Tracy Kidder  --  Mountains Beyond Mountains
  • adulterated = made less good by adding an inferior substance
  • No, it was not anger, it was loathing; it was hatred, sheer and unadulterated, and as she became lost in hatred she also began to be lost in IT.
    Madeleine L'Engle  --  A Wrinkle in Time
  • unadulterated = pure or complete
    (editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unadulterated means not and reverses the meaning of adulterated. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • When focusing on them, he didn't focus on himself, and their joy still held an unadulterated purity.
    Nicholas Sparks  --  The Choice
  • unadulterated = pure
    (editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unadulterated means not and reverses the meaning of adulterated. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • I don't suppose you have any unadulterated vegetables?
    Sharon Creech  --  Walk Two Moons
  • unadulterated = pure (without anything added)
    (editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unadulterated means not and reverses the meaning of adulterated. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • I didn't cut this fella off for the sheer unadulterated pleasure of it, although it is an excellent weight-loss strategy.
    John Green  --  The Fault in Our Stars
  • unadulterated = pure
    (editor's note:  The prefix "un-" in unadulterated means not and reverses the meaning of adulterated. This is the same pattern you see in words like unhappy, unknown, and unlucky.)
  • Fauji cement was reputed to be reasonable and not too adulterated with additives to crumble in Himalayan weather.
    Greg Mortenson & David Oliver Relin  --  Three Cups of Tea
  • adulterated = made inferior by adding an inferior substance
  • The old man thereupon led me off to Churchill's only beer parlor (a place I would normally have avoided) and introduced me to wolf-juice: a mixture which consisted of something called Moose Brand Beer liberally adulterated with antifreeze alcohol obtained from the soldiers at the Air Base.
    Farley Mowat  --  Never Cry Wolf
  • adulterated = made impure by adding a foreign or inferior substance
  • I don't like my crème brûlée adulterated, because then you can't taste through to the quality of the ingredients.
    Malcolm Gladwell  --  Blink
  • adulterated = corrupted of made less good by adding a foreign or inferior substance
  • As no one makes any profit by the sale, there is no longer any stimulus to extravagance, and no misrepresentation; no cheating, no adulteration or imitation, no bribery or 'grafting.'
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • adulteration = lowering the quality of something by adding something else to it
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • He was in the same plight as the manufacturer who has to adulterate and misrepresent his product.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Of course, imitation and adulteration are the essence of competition—they are but another form of the phrase 'to buy in the cheapest market and sell in the dearest.'
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • When the children were not well at home, Teta Elzbieta would gather herbs and cure them; now she was obliged to go to the drugstore and buy extracts—and how was she to know that they were all adulterated?
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Consider all the waste incidental to the manufacture of cheap qualities of goods, of goods made to sell and deceive the ignorant; consider the wastes of adulteration,—the shoddy clothing, the cotton blankets, the unstable tenements, the ground-cork life-preservers, the adulterated milk, the aniline soda water, the potato-flour sausages—
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • Consider all the waste incidental to the manufacture of cheap qualities of goods, of goods made to sell and deceive the ignorant; consider the wastes of adulteration,—the shoddy clothing, the cotton blankets, the unstable tenements, the ground-cork life-preservers, the adulterated milk, the aniline soda water, the potato-flour sausages—
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • On one side of the room were the hoppers, into which men shoveled loads of meat and wheelbarrows full of spices; in these great bowls were whirling knives that made two thousand revolutions a minute, and when the meat was ground fine and adulterated with potato flour, and well mixed with water, it was forced to the stuffing machines on the other side of the room.
    Upton Sinclair  --  The Jungle

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