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absolve

used in a sentence
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Definition to find someone blameless; or forgive; or relieve (of a requirement or obligation)
  • The committee absolved her of any wrong doing.
absolved = found blameless
  • The First Amendment is often inconvenient. But that is besides the point. Inconvenience does not absolve the government of its obligation to tolerate speech.
    Justice Anthony Kennedy
  • The priest absolved him and told him to say ten Hail Mary's
  • I absolve you from this responsibility
  • All this he did as fully as he could, and prayed for absolution.
    Alan Paton  --  Cry, the Beloved Country
  • absolution = forgiveness
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Yes, he agreed, but it hadn't absolved me from my sin.
    Albert Camus  --  The Stranger
  • absolved = forgiven or made blameless
  • Then he tells me kneel, gives me absolution, tells me say three Hail Marys, three Our Fathers, three Glory Bes.
    Frank McCourt  --  Angela's Ashes
  • absolution = forgiveness for sins
    (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Saying kaddish and sitting shiva, that absolves them of any responsibility for you.
    James McBride  --  The Color of Water
  • absolves = relieves
  • I shouted back, "and I have absolved him of his sins!"
    Rudolfo Anaya  --  Bless Me, Ultima
  • absolved = relieved or forgiven
  • Being a divine, a ghostly confessor,
    A sin-absolver, and my friend profess'd,
    William Shakespeare  --  Romeo and Juliet
  • absolver = one who forgives
  • ...that one thing, which could absolve them of any but the grossest defect, was an interest in cattle.
    Cormac McCarthy  --  All the Pretty Horses
  • absolve = forgive
  • I saw his hand moving across his face as he absolved me.
    David Almond  --  Clay
  • absolved = forgave (his sins)
  • ...solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and...
    Thomas Jefferson et al.  --  The Declaration of Independence
  • absolved = relieved (from an obligation or requirement)
  • If all the world hated you and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved of you and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends.
    Charlotte Bronte
  • Like the scapegoat of the Bible, place society's ills on them, then "stone them" in absolution.
    Luis J. Rodriguez  --  Always Running
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • If you are asking me for forgiveness, or absolution
    Margaret Peterson Haddix  --  Uprising
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • The Monk covered that equipment by signature; his statement absolves the Agency.
    Robert Ludlum  --  The Bourne Identity
  • Once we are there, if your father is not reconciled, we will get Bishop F—— to absolve you from your promise, and you can return to Riom.
    Willa Cather  --  Death Comes for the Archbishop
  • "Every head bowed and every eye closed," said Graham, offering a traditional invitation to repentance, a declaration of faith, and absolution.
    Laura Hillenbrand  --  Unbroken
  • (editor's note:  The suffix "-tion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in action, education, and observation.)
  • Know you absolve me, don't you, Kid?
    Eugene O'Neill  --  Long Day's Journey into Night

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