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incredulous
used in The Witch of Blackbird Pond

6 uses
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Definition
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  •   "'Tis a strange thing, that the only friends I have I found in the same way, lying flat in the meadows, crying as though their hearts would break."
      The two young people stared at each other. "You?" breathed Kit incredulously.
      Nat laughed. "I'll have you know that I was only eight years old," he explained.
    p. 108.6
incredulously = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  •   "I would sit beside him and read to myself while he studied."
      "What sort of books?" John's voice was incredulous.
    p. 25.1
  • incredulous = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  •   "Young William Ashby asked permission today to pay his respects to my niece."
      A spoon clattered from Judith's fingers. There was utter silence in the room as Rachel and both her daughters turned to stare at Kit.
      "You mean call on Katherine?" Aunt Rachel's voice was incredulous.
    p. 65.5
  • incredulous = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  •   "Play-acting! And with the Bible!"
      Reverend Woodbridge stared incredulously at Mercy. "What could you have been thinking of, Mercy, to allow such a thing?"
    p. 89.4
  • incredulously = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  •   "It has always been Mercy, from the very beginning. Didn't you guess that?"
      "Oh John!" In a burst of incredulous joy Kit flung both arms rapturously about his neck.
    p. 139.6
  • incredulous = hearing something so unexpected
  • Then, still incredulous, he looked back at Judith.
    p. 143.1
incredulous = having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
There are no more uses of "incredulous" in The Witch of Blackbird Pond.

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