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prudent
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

20 uses
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?  —19 uses
exact meaning not specified
Definition
sensible and careful
  • He left the wall, and stood above the ditch, But from the Greeks apart, rememb'ring well His mother's prudent counsel; there he stood, And shouted loudly; Pallas join'd her voice, And fill'd with terror all the Trojan host.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (32% in)
  • He thus with prudent words the chiefs address'd: "Alas, alas! what grief is this for Greece!
    1.1 — Volume 1 Book 1 (43% in)
  • But first, of all the Elders, by the side Of Nestor's ship, the aged Pylian chief, A secret conclave Agamemnon call'd; And, prudent, thus the chosen few address'd: "Hear me, my friends!
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (6% in)
  • Who thus with prudent speech replied, and said: "O friends, the chiefs and councillors of Greece, If any other had this Vision seen, We should have deem'd it false, and laugh'd to scorn The idle tale; but now it hath appear'd, Of all our army, to the foremost man: Seek we then straight to arm the sons of Greece."
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (9% in)
  • He thus with prudent phrase his speech began: "Great son of Atreus, on thy name, O King, Throughout the world will foul reproach be cast, If Greeks forget their promise, nor make good The vow they took to thee, when hitherward We sailed from Argos' grassy plains, to raze, Ere our return, the well-built walls of Troy.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (32% in)
  • Between the chiefs they held their wands, and thus Idaeus both with prudent speech address'd: "No more, brave youths! no longer wage the fight: To cloud-compelling Jove ye both are dear, Both valiant spearmen; that, we all have seen.
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (55% in)
  • The rage of thirst and hunger satisfied, The aged Nestor first his mind disclos'd; He who, before, the sagest counsel gave, Now thus with prudent speech began, and said: "Atrides, and ye other chiefs of Greece, Since many a long-hair'd Greek hath fall'n in fight, Whose blood, beside Scamander's flowing stream, Fierce Mars has shed, while to the viewless shades Their spirits are gone, behoves thee with the morn The warfare of the Greeks to intermit: Then we, with oxen and with mules,...
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (64% in)
  • This said, he sat; and aged Priam next, A God in council, Dardan's son, arose, Who thus with prudent speech began, and said: "Hear now, ye Trojans, Dardans, and Allies, The words I speak, the promptings of my soul: Now through the city take your wonted meal; Look to your watch, let each man keep his guard: To-morrow shall Idaeus to the ships Of Greece, to both the sons of Atreus, bear The words of Paris, cause of all this war; And ask besides, if from the deadly strife Such truce they...
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (72% in)
  • ...assembled Elders in his tent An ample banquet Agamemnon spread; They on the viands, set before them, fell: The rage of thirst and hunger satisfied, The aged Nestor first his mind disclos'd He who, before, the sagest counsel gave, Now thus with prudent words began, and said: "Most mighty Agamemnon, King of men, With thee, Atrides, my discourse shall end, With thee begin: o'er many nations thou Hold'st sov'reign sway; since Jove to thee hath giv'n The sceptre, and the high prerogative,...
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (13% in)
  • Nor, in the Trojan camp, did Hector leave The chiefs to rest; but all to conf'rence call'd, The leaders and the councillors of Troy; To whom his prudent speech he thus address'd: "Who is there here, that for a rich reward A noble work will undertake?
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (50% in)
  • ...wine recruited, I began My speech, and urg'd ye both to join the war: Nor were ye loth to go; much sage advice Your elders gave; old Peleus bade his son To aim at highest honours, and surpass His comrades all; Menoetius, Actor's son, To thee this counsel gave: 'My son,' he said, 'Achilles is by birth above thee far; Thou art in years the elder; he in strength Surpasses thee; do thou with prudent words And timely speech address him, and advise And guide him; he will, to his good, obey.'
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (91% in)
  • To whom with prudent speech, Eurypylus: "No source, Heav'n-born Patroclus, have the Greeks, Of aid, but all must perish by their ships: For in the ships lie all our bravest late, By spear or arrow struck, by Trojan hands; And fiercer, hour by hour, their onset grows.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (95% in)
  • Thus he: the prudent counsel Hector pleas'd; Down from his chariot with his arms he leap'd, And to Polydamas his speech address'd: "Polydamas, detain thou here the chiefs; Thither will I, and meet the front of war, And, giv'n my orders, quickly here return."
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (87% in)
  • He thus with prudent speech began, and said: "Great is the marvel which our eyes behold, That Hector see again to life restor'd, Escap'd the death we hop'd him to have met Beneath the hands of Ajax Telamon.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (37% in)
  • First Panthous' son, the sage Polydamas, Address'd th' assembly; his sagacious mind Alone beheld the future and the past; The friend of Hector, born the selfsame night; One in debate, the other best in arms; Who thus with prudent speech began, and said: "Be well advis'd, my friends! my counsel is That we regain the city, nor the morn Here in the plain, beside the ships, await, So far remov'd from our protecting walls.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (38% in)
  • To whom Antilochus with prudent speech: "Have patience with me yet; for I, O King, O Menelaus, am thy junior far; My elder and superior thee I own.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (63% in)
  • ...Nestor's son led forth, And plac'd in Menelaus' hands the mare: The monarch's soul was melted, like the dew Which glitters on the ears of growing corn, That bristle o'er the plain; e'en so thy soul, O Menelaus, melted at his speech; To whom were thus address'd thy winged words: "Antilochus, at once I lay aside My anger; thou art prudent, and not apt To be thus led astray; but now thy youth Thy judgment hath o'erpow'r'd; seek not henceforth By trick'ry o'er thine elders to prevail.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (65% in)
  • Then, some God Bid Thetis hither to my presence haste; And I with prudent words will counsel her, That so Achilles may at Priam's hand Large ransom take, and set brave Hector free."
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (10% in)
  • The twain had pass'd by Ilus' lofty tomb, And halted there the horses and the mules Beside the margin of the stream to drink; For darkness now was creeping o'er the earth: When through the gloom the herald Hermes saw Approaching near, to Priam thus he cried: "O son of Dardanus, bethink thee well; Of prudent counsel great is now our need.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (44% in)

There are no more uses of "prudent" flagged with this meaning in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —1 use
exact meaning not specified
  • I should not fear, by him accompanied, To pass through fire, and safely both return; So far in prudence he surpasses all.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (40% in)

There are no more uses of "prudent" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®