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metaphor
used in The Hunchback of Notre Dame

2 uses
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Definition
a figure of speech in which a similarity between two things is highlighted by using a word to refer to something that it does not literally denote — as when Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage."

When Shakespeare wrote, "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players." he was not saying the world is really a stage and all people are actors. But he was pointing to the similarities he wants us to recognize.
  • I declare that this bold metaphor is admirable, and that the natural history of the theatre, on a day of allegory and royal marriage songs, is not in the least startled by a dolphin who is the son of a lion.
    1.1.2 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 2 — Pierre Gringoire (94% in)
  • Nevertheless, in that throng, upon which the four allegories vied with each other in pouring out floods of metaphors, there was no ear more attentive, no heart that palpitated more, not an eye was more haggard, no neck more outstretched, than the eye, the ear, the neck, and the heart of the author, of the poet, of that brave Pierre Gringoire, who had not been able to resist, a moment before, the joy of telling his name to two pretty girls.
    1.1.2 — Vol 1 Bk 1 Chpt 2 — Pierre Gringoire (62% in)

There are no more uses of "metaphor" in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

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