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ostentatious
used in The House of the Seven Gables

3 uses
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Definition
intended to attract notice and impress others — especially with wealth in a vulgar way
  • Hidden from mankind,—forgotten by himself, or buried so deeply under a sculptured and ornamented pile of ostentatious deeds that his daily life could take no note of it,—there may have lurked some evil and unsightly thing.
    Chapter 15 — The Scowl and Smile (37% in)
ostentatious = intended to attract notice and impress others
  • Nevertheless, even while she paraded these ideas somewhat ostentatiously through her mind, it is altogether surprising what a calmness had come over her.
    Chapter 3 — The First Customer (69% in)
  • Glistening sidewalks, with little pools of rain, here and there, along their unequal surface; umbrellas displayed ostentatiously in the shop-windows, as if the life of trade had concentrated itself in that one article; wet leaves of the horse-chestnut or elm-trees, torn off untimely by the blast and scattered along the public way; an unsightly, accumulation of mud in the middle of the street, which perversely grew the more unclean for its long and laborious washing,—these were the more...
    Chapter 17 — The Flight of Two Owls (9% in)

There are no more uses of "ostentatious" in The House of the Seven Gables.

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