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digress
used in Catch-22

2 uses
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Definition
wander from a direct or straight course — typically verbally
  • I'm so eager to begin that I'm almost reluctant to digress now to your problem, but I'm afraid I must.
    Chapter 27 — Nurse Duckett (29% in)
digress = wander from the main topic
  • After a while he realized that he was staring at rows and rows of bushels of red plum tomatoes and grew so intrigued by the question of what bushels brimming with red plum tomatoes were doing in a group commander's office that he forgot completely about the discussion of prayer meetings until Colonel Cathcart, in a genial digression, inquired: 'Would you like to buy some, Chaplain?'
    Chapter 19 — Colonel Cathcart (39% in)
digression = wandering from the main topic of conversation

(editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
There are no more uses of "digress" in Catch-22.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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