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consequence
used in Sense and Sensibility

2 meanings, 25 uses
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1  —19 uses as in:
a direct consequence of
Definition
a result of something (often an undesired side effect)
  • —he knew nothing of what had passed; and the first hours of his visit were consequently spent in hearing and in wondering.
    Chapter 49 (76% in)
consequently = as a result
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • To her it was but the natural consequence of a strong affection in a young and ardent mind.
    Chapter 11 (28% in)
  • But suspicion of something unpleasant is the inevitable consequence of such an alteration as we just witnessed in him.
    Chapter 15 (54% in)
  • "The consequence of which, I suppose, will be," said Mrs. Dashwood, "since leisure has not promoted your own happiness, that your sons will be brought up to as many pursuits, employments, professions, and trades as Columella's."
    Chapter 19 (28% in)
  • When their promised visit to the Park and consequent introduction to these young ladies took place, they found in the appearance of the eldest, who was nearly thirty, with a very plain and not a sensible face, nothing to admire; but in the other, who was not more than two or three and twenty, they acknowledged considerable beauty; her features were pretty, and she had a sharp quick eye, and a smartness of air, which though it did not give actual elegance or grace, gave distinction to...
    Chapter 21 (24% in)
  • With regard to herself, it was now a matter of unconcern whether she went to town or not, and when she saw her mother so thoroughly pleased with the plan, and her sister exhilarated by it in look, voice, and manner, restored to all her usual animation, and elevated to more than her usual gaiety, she could not be dissatisfied with the cause, and would hardly allow herself to distrust the consequence.
    Chapter 25 (94% in)
  • As for Marianne, on the pangs which so unhappy a meeting must already have given her, and on those still more severe which might await her in its probable consequence, she could not reflect without the deepest concern.
    Chapter 28 (95% in)
  • ... returned to Marianne, whom she found attempting to rise from the bed, and whom she reached just in time to prevent her from falling on the floor, faint and giddy from a long want of proper rest and food; for it was many days since she had any appetite, and many nights since she had really slept; and now, when her mind was no longer supported by the fever of suspense, the consequence of all this was felt in an aching head, a weakened stomach, and a general nervous faintness.
    Chapter 29 (46% in)
  • The consequence of this, upon a mind so young, so lively, so inexperienced as Mrs. Brandon's, was but too natural.
    Chapter 31 (49% in)
  • He imagined, and calmly could he imagine it, that her extravagance, and consequent distress, had obliged her to dispose of it for some immediate relief.
    Chapter 31 (58% in)
  • Far be it from me to repine at his doing so; he had an undoubted right to dispose of his own property as he chose, but, in consequence of it, we have been obliged to make large purchases of linen, china, &c. to supply the place of what was taken away.
    Chapter 33 (66% in)
  • She then left the room; and Elinor dared not follow her to say more, for bound as she was by her promise of secrecy to Lucy, she could give no information that would convince Marianne; and painful as the consequences of her still continuing in an error might be, she was obliged to submit to it.
    Chapter 35 (97% in)
  • The consequence of which was, that Mrs. John Dashwood was obliged to submit not only to the exceedingly great inconvenience of sending her carriage for the Miss Dashwoods, but, what was still worse, must be subject to all the unpleasantness of appearing to treat them with attention: and who could tell that they might not expect to go out with her a second time?
    Chapter 36 (30% in)
  • By which the Colonel was surprised to find that SHE was considering Mr. Ferrars's marriage as the certain consequence of the presentation; for he did not suppose it possible that Delaford living could supply such an income, as anybody in his style of life would venture to settle on— and he said so.
    Chapter 39 (88% in)
  • The consequence was, that Elinor set out by herself to pay a visit, for which no one could really have less inclination, and to run the risk of a tete-a-tete with a woman, whom neither of the others had so much reason to dislike.
    Chapter 41 (15% in)
  • Her thoughts were silently fixed on the irreparable injury which too early an independence and its consequent habits of idleness, dissipation, and luxury, had made in the mind, the character, the happiness, of a man who, to every advantage of person and talents, united a disposition naturally open and honest, and a feeling, affectionate temper.
    Chapter 44 (91% in)
  • Some letters had passed between her and her brother, in consequence of Marianne's illness;
    Chapter 47 (56% in)
  • That he should be married soon, before (as she imagined) he could be in orders, and consequently before he could be in possession of the living, surprised her a little at first.
    Chapter 48 (10% in)
  • "It was a foolish, idle inclination on my side," said he, "the consequence of ignorance of the world— and want of employment."
    Chapter 49 (9% in)

There are no more uses of "consequence" flagged with this meaning in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —5 uses as in:
of little consequence
Definition
importance or relevance
  • I have something of consequence to inform you of, which I was on the point of communicating by paper.
    Chapter 40 (48% in)
consequence = importance
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • It was the offer of a small house, on very easy terms, belonging to a relation of her own, a gentleman of consequence and property in Devonshire.
    Chapter 4 (77% in)
  • He so frequently talked of the increasing expenses of housekeeping, and of the perpetual demands upon his purse, which a man of any consequence in the world was beyond calculation exposed to, that he seemed rather to stand in need of more money himself than to have any design of giving money away.
    Chapter 5 (80% in)
  • He entered the room with a look of self-consequence, slightly bowed to the ladies, without speaking a word, and, after briefly surveying them and their apartments, took up a newspaper from the table, and continued to read it as long as he staid.
    Chapter 19 (69% in)
  • My objection is this; though I think very well of Mrs. Jennings's heart, she is not a woman whose society can afford us pleasure, or whose protection will give us consequence.
    Chapter 25 (62% in)

There are no more uses of "consequence" flagged with this meaning in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —1 use
exact meaning not specified
  • As soon as they returned to the carriage, Mrs. Jennings was eager for information; but as Elinor wished to spread as little as possible intelligence that had in the first place been so unfairly obtained, she confined herself to the brief repetition of such simple particulars, as she felt assured that Lucy, for the sake of her own consequence, would choose to have known.
    Chapter 38 (77% in)

There are no more uses of "consequence" in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®