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reconcile
used in Sense and Sensibility

7 uses
  • It determined him to attempt a reconciliation, though not exactly in the manner pointed out by their brother and sister.
    Chapter 49 (92% in)
  • To this determination she was the more easily reconciled, by recollecting that Edward Ferrars, by Lucy's account, was not to be in town before February; and that their visit, without any unreasonable abridgement, might be previously finished.
    Chapter 25 (72% in)
  • I had depended on her fortitude too far, and the blow was a severe one— but had her marriage been happy, so young as I then was, a few months must have reconciled me to it, or at least I should not have now to lament it.
    Chapter 31 (48% in)
  • Miss Steele was the least discomposed of the three, by their presence; and it was in their power to reconcile her to it entirely.
    Chapter 36 (12% in)
  • After that, I suppose, I WAS wrong in remaining so much in Sussex, and the arguments with which I reconciled myself to the expediency of it, were no better than these:—The danger is my own; I am doing no injury to anybody but myself.
    Chapter 49 (63% in)
  • — "And if they really DO interest themselves," said Marianne, in her new character of candour, "in bringing about a reconciliation, I shall think that even John and Fanny are not entirely without merit."
    Chapter 49 (98% in)
  • The selfish sagacity of the latter, which had at first drawn Robert into the scrape, was the principal instrument of his deliverance from it; for her respectful humility, assiduous attentions, and endless flatteries, as soon as the smallest opening was given for their exercise, reconciled Mrs. Ferrars to his choice, and re-established him completely in her favour.
    Chapter 50 (40% in)

There are no more uses of "reconcile" in Sense and Sensibility.

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