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prudent
used in Sense and Sensibility

29 uses
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?  —21 uses
exact meaning not specified
Definition
sensible and careful
  • but I was too young, and loved him too well, to be so prudent as I ought to have been.
    Chapter 22 (45% in)
prudent = sensible and careful
  • His father was rendered easy by such an assurance, and Mr. John Dashwood had then leisure to consider how much there might prudently be in his power to do for them.
    Chapter 1 (49% in)
  • Elinor, this eldest daughter, whose advice was so effectual, possessed a strength of understanding, and coolness of judgment, which qualified her, though only nineteen, to be the counsellor of her mother, and enabled her frequently to counteract, to the advantage of them all, that eagerness of mind in Mrs. Dashwood which must generally have led to imprudence.
    Chapter 1 (82% in)
  • She was generous, amiable, interesting: she was everything but prudent.
    Chapter 1 (87% in)
  • Believe them to be stronger than I have declared; believe them, in short, to be such as his merit, and the suspicion—the hope of his affection for me may warrant, without imprudence or folly.
    Chapter 4 (44% in)
  • Elinor had always thought it would be more prudent for them to settle at some distance from Norland, than immediately amongst their present acquaintance.
    Chapter 4 (94% in)
  • CHAPTER 12 As Elinor and Marianne were walking together the next morning the latter communicated a piece of news to her sister, which in spite of all that she knew before of Marianne's imprudence and want of thought, surprised her by its extravagant testimony of both.
    Chapter 12 (2% in)
  • It is not so very likely he should be distressed in his circumstances NOW, for he is a very prudent man, and to be sure must have cleared the estate by this time.
    Chapter 14 (17% in)
  • His imprudence had made her miserable for a while; but it seemed to have deprived himself of all chance of ever being otherwise.
    Chapter 23 (16% in)
  • "And what," said Mrs. Dashwood, "is my dear prudent Elinor going to suggest?
    Chapter 25 (59% in)
  • Yet as she was convinced that Marianne's affection for Willoughby, could leave no hope of Colonel Brandon's success, whatever the event of that affection might be, and at the same time wished to shield her conduct from censure, she thought it most prudent and kind, after some consideration, to say more than she really knew or believed.
    Chapter 27 (94% in)
  • But her condemnation of him did not blind her to the impropriety of their having been written at all; and she was silently grieving over the imprudence which had hazarded such unsolicited proofs of tenderness, not warranted by anything preceding, and most severely condemned by the event, when Marianne, perceiving that she had finished the letters, observed to her that they contained nothing but what any one would have written in the same situation.
    Chapter 29 (75% in)
  • I had allowed her, (imprudently, as it has since turned out,) at her earnest desire, to go to Bath with one of her young friends, who was attending her father there for his health.
    Chapter 31 (73% in)
  • Elinor was to be the comforter of others in her own distresses, no less than in theirs; and all the comfort that could be given by assurances of her own composure of mind, and a very earnest vindication of Edward from every charge but of imprudence, was readily offered.
    Chapter 37 (36% in)
  • I am not conscious of having provoked the disappointment by any imprudence of my own, I have borne it as much as possible without spreading it farther.
    Chapter 37 (47% in)
  • ...but all over the grounds, and especially in the most distant parts of them, where there was something more of wildness than in the rest, where the trees were the oldest, and the grass was the longest and wettest, had—assisted by the still greater imprudence of sitting in her wet shoes and stockings—given Marianne a cold so violent as, though for a day or two trifled with or denied, would force itself by increasing ailments on the concern of every body, and the notice of herself.
    Chapter 42 (94% in)
  • Elinor's delight, as she saw what each felt in the meeting, was only checked by an apprehension of its robbing Marianne of farther sleep;— but Mrs. Dashwood could be calm, could be even prudent, when the life of a child was at stake, and Marianne, satisfied in knowing her mother was near her, and conscious of being too weak for conversation, submitted readily to the silence and quiet prescribed by every nurse around her.
    Chapter 45 (26% in)
  • I considered the past: I saw in my own behaviour, since the beginning of our acquaintance with him last autumn, nothing but a series of imprudence towards myself, and want of kindness to others.
    Chapter 46 (67% in)
  • "Rather say your mother's imprudence, my child," said Mrs. Dashwood; "SHE must be answerable."
    Chapter 47 (44% in)
  • Elinor scolded him, harshly as ladies always scold the imprudence which compliments themselves, for having spent so much time with them at Norland, when he must have felt his own inconstancy.
    Chapter 49 (59% in)
  • Mrs. Dashwood was prudent enough to remain at the cottage, without attempting a removal to Delaford; and fortunately for Sir John and Mrs. Jennings, when Marianne was taken from them, Margaret had reached an age highly suitable for dancing, and not very ineligible for being supposed to have a lover.
    Chapter 50 (95% in)

There are no more uses of "prudent" flagged with this meaning in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —8 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • Few people of common prudence will do THAT; and whatever she saves, she will be able to dispose of.
    Chapter 33 (78% in)
  • But she could hear of no situation that at once answered her notions of comfort and ease, and suited the prudence of her eldest daughter, whose steadier judgment rejected several houses as too large for their income, which her mother would have approved.
    Chapter 3 (7% in)
  • Some mothers might have encouraged the intimacy from motives of interest, for Edward Ferrars was the eldest son of a man who had died very rich; and some might have repressed it from motives of prudence, for, except a trifling sum, the whole of his fortune depended on the will of his mother.
    Chapter 3 (30% in)
  • Elinor thought this generosity overstrained, considering her sister's youth, and urged the matter farther, but in vain; common sense, common care, common prudence, were all sunk in Mrs. Dashwood's romantic delicacy.
    Chapter 16 (34% in)
  • I believe I have been wrong in saying so much, but I hardly know what to do, and on your prudence I have the strongest dependence.
    Chapter 27 (87% in)
  • I am sure you will be glad to hear, as likewise dear Mrs. Jennings, I spent two happy hours with him yesterday afternoon, he would not hear of our parting, though earnestly did I, as I thought my duty required, urge him to it for prudence sake, and would have parted for ever on the spot, would he consent to it; but he said it should never be, he did not regard his mother's anger, while he could have my affections; our prospects are not very bright, to be sure, but we must wait, and...
    Chapter 38 (89% in)
  • After a moment's recollection, therefore, concluding that prudence required dispatch, and that her acquiescence would best promote it, she walked silently towards the table, and sat down.
    Chapter 44 (4% in)
  • I had reason to believe myself secure of my present wife, if I chose to address her, and I persuaded myself to think that nothing else in common prudence remained for me to do.
    Chapter 44 (42% in)

There are no more uses of "prudent" in Sense and Sensibility.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®