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blight
used in Jane Eyre

10 uses
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Definition
causing or consisting of extensive damage
  • When full of flowers they would doubtless look pretty; but now, at the latter end of January, all was wintry blight and brown decay.
    Chapter 5 (69% in)
  • The more you and I converse, the better; for while I cannot blight you, you may refresh me.
    Chapter 15 (28% in)
  • I wish to foster, not to blight — to earn gratitude, not to wring tears of blood — no, nor of brine: my harvest must be in smiles, in endearments, in sweet — That will do.
    Chapter 19 (63% in)
  • Bitter and base associations have become the sole food of your memory: you wander here and there, seeking rest in exile: happiness in pleasure — I mean in heartless, sensual pleasure — such as dulls intellect and blights feeling.
    Chapter 20 (89% in)
  • Contempt fell cool on Mr. Rochester — his passion died as if a blight had shrivelled it up: he only asked — "What have YOU to say?"
    Chapter 26 (40% in)
  • Oh, never more could it turn to him; for faith was blighted — confidence destroyed!
    Chapter 26 (92% in)
  • That woman, who has so abused your long-suffering, so sullied your name, so outraged your honour, so blighted your youth, is not your wife, nor are you her husband.
    Chapter 27 (47% in)
  • I should still have my unblighted self to turn to: my natural unenslaved feelings with which to communicate in moments of loneliness.
    Chapter 34 (88% in)
  • There would be recesses in my mind which would be only mine, to which he never came, and sentiments growing there fresh and sheltered which his austerity could never blight, nor his measured warrior-march trample down: but as his wife — at his side always, and always restrained, and always checked — forced to keep the fire of my nature continually low, to compel it to burn inwardly and never utter a cry, though the imprisoned flame consumed vital after vital — THIS would be...
    Chapter 34 (89% in)
  • His form was of the same strong and stalwart contour as ever: his port was still erect, his hair was still raven black; nor were his features altered or sunk: not in one year's space, by any sorrow, could his athletic strength be quelled or his vigorous prime blighted.
    Chapter 37 (9% in)

There are no more uses of "blight" in Jane Eyre.

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