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blight
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Definition causing or consisting of extensive damage

Blight can more specifically refer to numerous diseases that devastate plants.
  • The once thriving downtown has become an example of urban blight with abandoned buildings and too much crime.
blight = causing or consisting of extensive damage
  • Too much rain may blight the garden with mold
  • The scandal blighted her political future.
  • The foreclosures are a blight on the neighborhood.
  • Well, said Samuel, silence struck the gathering like a blight.
    Alice Walker  --  The Color Purple
  • blight = something that causes extensive damage
  • I am going over to Senator Whitworth's house myself and telling him you, Skeeter Phelan, will be a blight on his campaign in Washington.
    Kathryn Stockett  --  The Help
  • blight = something that causes extensive damage
  • The Dead Period, when all my trees looked like they had been through a forest fire or a blight.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  Speak
  • blight = serious disease (causing extensive damage)
  • Five figures wandered slowly over the blighted land.
    Douglas Adams  --  The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
  • blighted = extensively damaged
  • But Georgiana had no sooner touched the flower than the whole plant suffered a blight, its leaves turning coal-black as if by the agency of fire.
    Nathaniel Hawthorne  --  The Birthmark
  • blight = extensive damage (or a disease causing extensive damage)
  • What a terrible blight that would be on the heart of a free, intelligent father!
    Harriet Jacobs  --  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
  • blight = cause of extensive damage
  • She says 'twould break your heart to think of what the English did to us, that if they didn't put the blight on the potato they didn't do much to take it off.
    Frank McCourt  --  Angela's Ashes
  • blight = a plant disease causing extensive damage
  • This house depresses and chills one,' said Kate, 'and seems as if some blight had fallen on it.
    Dickens, Charles  --  The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby
  • Such a marriage would irretrievably blight my son's career, and ruin his prospects.
    Dickens, Charles  --  David Copperfield
  • Had I done wrong to blight her cherished hopes?
    Bronte, Anne  --  The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
  • I was willing to present it to them, but they would have it in no guise; there seemed to be a blight on everything that was Scotch.
    Barrie, James Matthew  --  Margaret Ogilvy
  • Yes, you may kiss me, and cry; and wring out my kisses and tears: they'll blight you - they'll damn you.
    Bronte, Emily  --  Wuthering Heights
  • A blight seemed to have descended on her.
    Montgomery, Lucy Maud  --  Anne Of Green Gables
  • Tess's passing corporeal blight had been her mental harvest.
    Hardy, Thomas  --  Tess of the d'Urbervilles - A Pure Woman
  • Rather than blight the prospects of so pure and lovely a creature I will make every sacrifice short of honor—let it be $30,000, Mr.
    Cooper, James Fenimore  --  Autobiography of a Pocket-Handkerchief
  • For there again, against the glass, as if to blight his confession and stay his answer, was the hideous author of our woe—the white face of damnation.
    Henry James  --  The Turn of the Screw

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