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incredulous
used in The Great Gatsby

8 uses
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Definition
unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • For a moment I suspected that he was pulling my leg, but a glance at him convinced me otherwise. ... With an effort I managed to restrain my incredulous laughter.
    p. 66.1
incredulous = disbelieving
  • Her host looked at her incredulously.
    p. 10.9
  • incredulously = with disbelief
  • "Crazy about him!" cried Myrtle incredulously.
    p. 35.1
  • incredulously = with difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • "She's embarrassed?" he repeated incredulously.
    p. 87.9
  • incredulously = with difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • "Can't repeat the past?" he cried incredulously.
    p. 110.1
  • incredulously = with disbelief
  • He was incredulous.
    p. 122.3
  • incredulous = unbelieving; or having difficulty accepting something so unexpected
  • Then Tom's voice, incredulous and insulting: "You must have gone there about the time Biloxi went to New Haven."
    p. 129.0
  • incredulous = unbelieving
  • Repeated Tom incredulously.
    p. 130.0
incredulously = with disbelief
There are no more uses of "incredulous" in The Great Gatsby.

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