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deride
used in Brave New World

8 uses
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Definition
to criticize with strong disrespect — often
with humor
  •   The singing words mocked him derisively.
      "How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world ..."
    p. 209.5
derisively = in a manner that showed no respect for his feelings or ideas

(editor's note:  We first hear John quote these lines from Shakespeare's The Tempest when he is joyful. Shakespeare wrote, "How beauteous mankind is. O brave new world that has such people in it." It expresses delight in the beauty of humanity. This time, when John says the words, he is looking at dozens of factory-created identical twins and is feeling very different.)
  • "It's all right, Director," he said in a tone of faint derision, "I won't corrupt them."
    p. 35.8
  • derision = indicating that the Director's concerns should not be taken seriously

    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • Was that a kind of bestial derision that he detected in those blank grey eyes?
    p. 65.8
  • derision = lack of respect

    (editor's note:  The suffix "-sion", converts a verb into a noun that denotes the action or result of the verb. Typically, there is a slight change in the ending of the root verb, as in admission from admit, discussion from discuss, and invasion from invade.)
  • "Yes, I know," said Bernard derisively.
    p. 91.2
  • derisively = showing disrespect for the concept
  • It was only in Zuñi that the Savage could adequately express what he felt about the Arch-Community-Songster. "Háni!" he added as an after-thought; and then (with what derisive ferocity!): "Sons éso tse-ná." And he spat on the ground, as Popé might have done. In the end Bernard had to slink back, diminished, to his rooms and inform the impatient assembly that the Savage would not be appearing that evening.
    p. 173.2
  • derisive = disrespectful (treating as inferior and unworthy of respect)

    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  • "O brave new world, O brave new world ..." In his mind the singing words seemed to change their tone. They had mocked him through his misery and remorse, mocked him with how hideous a note of cynical derision!
    p. 210.2
  • derision = disrespect

    (editor's note:  We first hear John quote this line from Shakespeare's The Tempest when he is joyful. Shakespeare wrote, "How beauteous mankind is. O brave new world that has such people in it." It expresses delight in the beauty of humanity. This time, when John says the words, he is looking at dozens of factory-created identical twins and is feeling very different.)
  • And Tomakin, ex-Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning, Tomakin was still on holiday–on holiday from humiliation and pain, in a world where he could not hear those words, that derisive laughter, could not see that hideous face, feel those moist and flabby arms round his neck, in a beautiful world ... "What you need," the Savage went on, "is something with tears for a change.
    p. 239.2
  • derisive = mocking (showing a lack of respect)

    (editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
  •   "Evil's an unreality if you take a couple of grammes."
      "Kohakwa iyathtokyai!" The tone was menacingly derisive.
    p. 251.2
derisive = contemptuous (treating as unworthy of respect)

(editor's note:  The suffix "-ive" converts a word into an adjective; though over time, what was originally an adjective often comes to be used as a noun. The adjective pattern means tending to and is seen in words like attractive, impressive, and supportive. Examples of the noun include narrative, alternative, and detective.)
There are no more uses of "deride" in Brave New World.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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