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distinct
used in The Scarlet Letter

19 uses
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Definition
clear, easily noticed, and/or identifiable as different or separate
  • Or, must she receive those intimations—so obscure, yet so distinct—as truth?
    Chapter 5 — Hester at her Needle (88% in)
  • There he used to sit, gazing with a somewhat dim serenity of aspect at the figures that came and went, amid the rustle of papers, the administering of oaths, the discussion of business, and the casual talk of the office; all which sounds and circumstances seemed but indistinctly to impress his senses, and hardly to make their way into his inner sphere of contemplation.
    Introductory (41% in)
  • Moonlight, in a familiar room, falling so white upon the carpet, and showing all its figures so distinctly—making every object so minutely visible, yet so unlike a morning or noontide visibility—is a medium the most suitable for a romance-writer to get acquainted with his illusive guests.
    Introductory (77% in)
  • Yet there were intervals when the whole scene, in which she was the most conspicuous object, seemed to vanish from her eyes, or, at least, glimmered indistinctly before them, like a mass of imperfectly shaped and spectral images.
    Chapter 2 — The Market Place (83% in)
  • Therefore, first allowing her to pass, they pursued her at a distance with shrill cries, and the utterances of a word that had no distinct purport to their own minds, but was none the less terrible to her, as proceeding from lips that babbled it unconsciously.
    Chapter 5 — Hester at her Needle (76% in)
  • Their voices came down, afar and indistinctly, from the upper heights where they habitually dwelt.
    Chapter 11 — The Interior of a Heart (41% in)
  • It showed the familiar scene of the street with the distinctness of mid-day, but also with the awfulness that is always imparted to familiar objects by an unaccustomed light.
    Chapter 12 — The Minister's Vigil (61% in)
  • Oftener, however, its credibility rested on the faith of some lonely eye-witness, who beheld the wonder through the coloured, magnifying, and distorted medium of his imagination, and shaped it more distinctly in his after-thought.
    Chapter 12 — The Minister's Vigil (70% in)
  • Throwing his eyes anxiously in the direction of the voice, he indistinctly beheld a form under the trees, clad in garments so sombre, and so little relieved from the gray twilight into which the clouded sky and the heavy foliage had darkened the noontide, that he knew not whether it were a woman or a shadow.
    Chapter 17 — The Pastor and his Parishioner (3% in)
  • The ray quivered to and fro, making her figure dim or distinct—now like a real child, now like a child's spirit—as the splendour went and came again.
    Chapter 18 — A Flood of Sunshine (78% in)
  • Hester felt herself, in some indistinct and tantalizing manner, estranged from Pearl, as if the child, in her lonely ramble through the forest, had strayed out of the sphere in which she and her mother dwelt together, and was now vainly seeking to return to it.
    Chapter 19 — The Child at the Brookside (30% in)
  • In order to free his mind from this indistinctness and duplicity of impression, which vexed it with a strange disquietude, he recalled and more thoroughly defined the plans which Hester and himself had sketched for their departure.
    Chapter 20 — The Minister in a Maze (4% in)
  • There was, perhaps, a fortunate disorder in his utterance, which failed to impart any distinct idea to the good widows comprehension, or which Providence interpreted after a method of its own.
    Chapter 20 — The Minister in a Maze (46% in)
  • Not more by its hue than by some indescribable peculiarity in its fashion, it had the effect of making her fade personally out of sight and outline; while again the scarlet letter brought her back from this twilight indistinctness, and revealed her under the moral aspect of its own illumination.
    Chapter 21 — The New England Holiday (5% in)
  • It would have been impossible to guess that this bright and sunny apparition owed its existence to the shape of gloomy gray; or that a fancy, at once so gorgeous and so delicate as must have been requisite to contrive the child's apparel, was the same that had achieved a task perhaps more difficult, in imparting so distinct a peculiarity to Hester's simple robe.
    Chapter 21 — The New England Holiday (19% in)
  • It was in sufficient proximity to bring the whole sermon to her ears, in the shape of an indistinct but varied murmur and flow of the minister's very peculiar voice.
    Chapter 22 — The Procession (61% in)
  • These, perhaps, if more distinctly heard, might have been only a grosser medium, and have clogged the spiritual sense.
    Chapter 22 — The Procession (64% in)
  • The sun, but little past its meridian, shone down upon the clergyman, and gave a distinctness to his figure, as he stood out from all the earth, to put in his plea of guilty at the bar of Eternal Justice.
    Chapter 23 — The Revelation of the Scarlet Letter (70% in)
  • We have thrown all the light we could acquire upon the portent, and would gladly, now that it has done its office, erase its deep print out of our own brain, where long meditation has fixed it in very undesirable distinctness.
    Chapter 24 — Conclusion (13% in)

There are no more uses of "distinct" in The Scarlet Letter.

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