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gene
used in Allegiant

158 uses
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?  —155 uses
exact meaning not specified
Definition
a single segment of DNA which when combined determine inherited traits such as hair color or height
  • A sign on the first fence reads BUREAU OF GENETIC WELFARE.
    p. 111.8
  • The Bureau of Genetic Welfare isn't tall, but it's still huge, wider than I can see, a mammoth of glass and steel and concrete.
    p. 112.3
  • Now it's the headquarters of the Bureau of Genetic Welfare—or just the Bureau, as we call it around here.
    p. 113.2
  • As Zoe probably told you already, I am the leader of the Bureau of Genetic Welfare.
    p. 119.8
  • There had been studies that indicated that violent tendencies could be partially traced to a person's genes—a gene called 'the murder gene' was the first of these, but there were quite a few more, genetic predispositions toward cowardice, dishonesty, low intelligence—all the qualities, in other words, that ultimately contribute to a broken society."
    p. 121.2
  • There had been studies that indicated that violent tendencies could be partially traced to a person's genes—a gene called 'the murder gene' was the first of these, but there were quite a few more, genetic predispositions toward cowardice, dishonesty, low intelligence—all the qualities, in other words, that ultimately contribute to a broken society."
    p. 121.2
  • I know so little about genetics—just what I can see passed down from parent to child, in my face and in friends' faces.
    p. 121.5
  • "That's how the genetic manipulation experiment was born.
    p. 122.0
  • It takes several generations for any kind of genetic manipulation to manifest, but people were selected from the general population in large numbers, according to their backgrounds or behavior, and they were given the option to give a gift to our future generations, a genetic alteration that would make their descendants just a little bit better.
    p. 122.1
  • It takes several generations for any kind of genetic manipulation to manifest, but people were selected from the general population in large numbers, according to their backgrounds or behavior, and they were given the option to give a gift to our future generations, a genetic alteration that would make their descendants just a little bit better.
    p. 122.3
  • I feel like I am not hearing anything new—just the same philosophy that spawned the factions, driving people to manipulate their genes instead of separating into virtue-based groups.
    p. 122.6
  • But when the genetic manipulations began to take effect, the alterations had disastrous consequences.
    p. 122.8
  • As it turns out, the attempt had resulted not in corrected genes, but in damaged ones," David says.
    p. 122.9
  • Humanity has never been perfect, but the genetic alterations made it worse than it had ever been before.
    p. 123.5
  • A civil war, waged by those with damaged genes, against the government and everyone with pure genes.
    p. 123.6
  • A civil war, waged by those with damaged genes, against the government and everyone with pure genes.
    p. 123.7
  • David continues, "When the war was finally over, the people demanded a permanent solution to the genetic problem.
    p. 124.4
  • And that is why the Bureau of Genetic Welfare was formed.
    p. 124.4
  • They called for genetically damaged individuals to come forward so that the Bureau could alter their genes.
    p. 124.6
  • And here is the simplest answer I have received: "Divergent" means that my genes are healed.
    p. 125.0
  • Your city is one of those experiments for genetic healing, and by far the most successful one, because of the behavioral modification portion.
    p. 125.4
  • "The factions were our predecessors' attempt to incorporate a 'nurture' element to the experiment—they discovered that mere genetic correction was not enough to change the way people behaved.
    p. 125.8
  • A new social order, combined with the genetic modification, was determined to be the most complete solution to the behavioral problems that the genetic damage had created.
    p. 125.9
  • A new social order, combined with the genetic modification, was determined to be the most complete solution to the behavioral problems that the genetic damage had created.
    p. 125.9
  • " 'Divergent' is the name we decided to give to those who have reached the desired level of genetic healing," says David.
    p. 126.5
  • We just need your healed genes to remain intact and to be passed on to future generations.
    p. 126.7
  • "However, we were surprised to discover that the behavioral modification component of our city's experiment was quite effective—up until recently, it actually helped quite a bit with the behavioral problems that made the genetic manipulation so problematic to begin with.
    p. 127.2
  • So generally, you would not be able to tell whether a person's genes were damaged or healed from their behavior."
    p. 127.3
  • I, and every other genetically damaged person, am limited by my damaged genes.
    p. 127.5
  • Is that the explanation for Caleb's betrayal—his damaged genes?
    p. 127.7
  • "Genes aren't everything," Amar says.
    p. 127.7
  • That internal war doesn't seem like a product of genetic damage—it seems completely, purely human.
    p. 128.0
  • And now they've told me that's the result of some kind of flaw in my genetics .... and that the factions themselves are just a mental prison to keep us under control.
    p. 133.5
  • "It's the symbol of the Bureau of Genetic Welfare," she says.
    p. 146.4
  • "But then we wouldn't have any water left to do anything else, and genetic damage isn't the kind of problem that can be solved with one big charge."
    p. 147.6
  • So in Indianapolis you just .... corrected their genes and shoved them in a city somewhere?
    p. 150.1
  • We located her almost by accident inside the damaged world, and her genes were nearly perfect.
    p. 153.1
  • "Listen, one of the things my supervisor and I do is genetic testing," Matthew says.
    p. 156.8
  • —would mind coming in so that I can test your genes.
    p. 156.9
  • "We haven't gotten to test the genes of someone in such a late generation of the experiment before, and you and Tobias seem to be somewhat .... odd, in your manifestations of certain things."
    p. 156.9
  • I hesitate, not sure if I want to see my genes, or Tobias's genes, or to compare them, like it matters.
    p. 157.5
  • I hesitate, not sure if I want to see my genes, or Tobias's genes, or to compare them, like it matters.
    p. 157.5
  • I feel excited, suddenly, to learn more about my genes, which feels like the same thing as reading my mother's journal: I will get pieces of her back.
    p. 157.9
  • Would you be up for undergoing a little genetic test this morning?
    p. 161.3
  • The phrase "a little genetic test" strikes me as an oxymoron.
    p. 161.4
  • Asking to see my genes feels a little like asking me to strip down.
    p. 161.4
  • "Well, this guy I met—Matthew is his name—works in one of the labs here, and he says they would be interested in looking at our genetic material for research," she says.
    p. 161.6
  • I barely remember that I agreed to participate in a genetic test until someone else appears at the door to the dormitory—a boy, or not really a boy, since he looks about as old as I am.
    p. 164.6
  • Through the windows everything looks peaceful, every blade of grass trimmed and the wild trees swaying in the distance, and it's hard to imagine that people are destroying one another out there because of "damaged genes" or living under Evelyn's strict rules in the city we left.
    p. 166.4
  • But some of them are also working on better ways to treat the genetic damage, or developing the serums for our own use instead of the experiments' use—dozens of projects.
    p. 166.6
  • "It's what will enable us to read your genes," Matthew says.
    p. 169.6
  • "I swear it's just going to read your genes.
    p. 169.8
  • They are designed to detect specific genetic markers and transmit the data to a computer.
    p. 170.2
  • It will take them about an hour to give me as much information as I need, though it would take them much longer to read all your genetic material, obviously.
    p. 170.3
  • "Well, when our predecessors at the Bureau inserted 'corrected' genes into your ancestors, they also included a genetic tracker, which is basically something that shows us that a person has achieved genetic healing.
    p. 170.8
  • "Well, when our predecessors at the Bureau inserted 'corrected' genes into your ancestors, they also included a genetic tracker, which is basically something that shows us that a person has achieved genetic healing.
    p. 170.8
  • "Well, when our predecessors at the Bureau inserted 'corrected' genes into your ancestors, they also included a genetic tracker, which is basically something that shows us that a person has achieved genetic healing.
    p. 170.9
  • In this case, the genetic tracker is awareness during simulations—it's something we can easily test for, which shows us if your genes are healed or not.
    p. 170.9
  • In this case, the genetic tracker is awareness during simulations—it's something we can easily test for, which shows us if your genes are healed or not.
    p. 171.0
  • That's one of the reasons why everyone in the city has to take the aptitude test at sixteen—if they're aware during the test, that shows us that they might have healed genes."
    p. 171.2
  • I can't believe that awareness during simulations, something that made me feel powerful and unique, something Jeanine and the Erudite killed people for, is actually just a sign of genetic healing to these people.
    p. 171.4
  • Matthew continues, "The only problem with the genetic tracker is that being aware during simulations and resisting serums doesn't necessarily mean that a person is Divergent, it's just a strong correlation.
    p. 171.6
  • Sometimes people will be aware during simulations or be able to resist serums even if they still have damaged genes.
    p. 171.8
  • "That's why I'm interested in your genes, Tobias.
    p. 171.8
  • What you see here is a simplified depiction of a particular DNA sequence in Tris's genetic material," he says.
    p. 175.1
  • These selections here suggest healed genes.
    p. 175.3
  • We wouldn't see them if the genes were damaged."
    p. 175.4
  • These selections over here indicate that the program also found the genetic tracker, the simulation awareness.
    p. 175.5
  • The combination of healed genes and simulation awareness genes is just what I expected to see from a Divergent.
    p. 175.6
  • The combination of healed genes and simulation awareness genes is just what I expected to see from a Divergent.
    p. 175.6
  • "This is the map of Tobias's genes," Matthew says.
    p. 175.8
  • "As you can see, he has the right genetic components for simulation awareness, but he doesn't have the same 'healed' genes that Tris does."
    p. 175.8
  • "As you can see, he has the right genetic components for simulation awareness, but he doesn't have the same 'healed' genes that Tris does."
    p. 175.9
  • Your genes are still damaged, but you have a genetic anomaly that allows you to be aware during simulations anyway.
    p. 176.1
  • Your genes are still damaged, but you have a genetic anomaly that allows you to be aware during simulations anyway.
    p. 176.1
  • "These people tell you there's something wrong with your genes, and you just believe it?"
    p. 177.7
  • "No pressure, but I'd like to talk to you about all this .... genetic-damage stuff.
    p. 178.4
  • I haven't seen him since the genetic test.
    p. 182.2
  • But he didn't take me to the side of the road to shoot me and he didn't take me to jail; he just took me to this secure area and tested my genes and told me all about the city experiments and how my genes were cleaner than other people's.
    p. 189.5
  • But he didn't take me to the side of the road to shoot me and he didn't take me to jail; he just took me to this secure area and tested my genes and told me all about the city experiments and how my genes were cleaner than other people's.
    p. 189.5
  • He even showed me a map of my genes on a screen to prove it.
    p. 189.5
  • There's that word again, "damage," the one that's been sinking and surfacing, sin king and surfacing in my mind since the genetic test.
    p. 194.9
  • Almost all of us are GDs—genetically damaged, leftovers from the failed city experiments or the descendants of other leftovers or people pulled in from the outside, like Tris's mother, except without her genetic advantage.
    p. 195.8
  • "It's just genetic, nothing more."
    p. 196.9
  • "It's about more than genes, here, and you know it."
    p. 196.9
  • "I'm not talking about my genes.
    p. 204.1
  • David said the Divergent are dying and someone has to stop it, because that's a waste of our best genetic material.
    p. 205.3
  • It seems there's no escaping the reach of genetic damage.
    p. 216.7
  • Genetic damage had nothing to do with it.
    p. 216.8
  • "A man surrounded by genetic damage cannot help but mimic it with his own behavior," Zoe says.
    p. 216.9
  • "Some of the people here want to blame genetic damage for everything," he says.
    p. 217.6
  • It looks like a copy of a contract, but it's handwritten in ink: I, Amanda Marie Ritter, of Peoria, Illinois, give my consent to the following procedures: The "genetic healing" procedure, as defined by the Bureau of Genetic Welfare: "a genetic engineering procedure designed to correct the genes specified as 'damaged' on page three of this form."
    p. 223.2
  • It looks like a copy of a contract, but it's handwritten in ink: I, Amanda Marie Ritter, of Peoria, Illinois, give my consent to the following procedures: The "genetic healing" procedure, as defined by the Bureau of Genetic Welfare: "a genetic engineering procedure designed to correct the genes specified as 'damaged' on page three of this form."
    p. 223.2
  • It looks like a copy of a contract, but it's handwritten in ink: I, Amanda Marie Ritter, of Peoria, Illinois, give my consent to the following procedures: The "genetic healing" procedure, as defined by the Bureau of Genetic Welfare: "a genetic engineering procedure designed to correct the genes specified as 'damaged' on page three of this form."
    p. 223.3
  • The "reset procedure," as defined by the Bureau of Genetic Welfare: "a memory-erasing procedure designed to make an experiment participant more fit for the experiment."
    p. 223.4
  • I declare that I have been thoroughly instructed as to the risks and benefits of these procedures by a member of the Bureau of Genetic Welfare.
    p. 223.6
  • I agree to reproduce at least twice to give my corrected genes the best possible chance of survival.
    p. 223.8
  • I also give my consent for my children and my children's children, etc., to continue in this experiment until such time as the Bureau of Genetic Welfare deems it to be complete.
    p. 224.0
  • It's not quite a lie, because the people in the Bureau do believe that healed genes will fix certain things, that if we integrate into the general population and pass our genes on, the world will be a better place.
    p. 225.5
  • It's not quite a lie, because the people in the Bureau do believe that healed genes will fix certain things, that if we integrate into the general population and pass our genes on, the world will be a better place.
    p. 225.6
  • They thought that keeping track of the factions would help them trace the path of the genes.
    p. 233.7
  • That conversation I had with you last night, about genetic damage .... it was actually a test.
    p. 234.5
  • I wanted to see how you would react to what I said about damaged genes, so I would know whether I could trust you or not," she says.
    p. 234.6
  • And even beyond that reasonable suspicion, I have brewing inside me the desperate hope that I am not damaged, that I am worth more than the corrected genes I pass on to any children I might have.
    p. 236.4
  • If we believe we're not 'damaged,' then we're saying that everything they're doing—the experiments, the genetic alterations, all of it—is a waste of time.
    p. 237.1
  • These are my genes, this is my mess.
    p. 237.6
  • And there's a lot of crime, which is blamed on genetic damage.
    p. 250.4
  • "The Bureau talks about this golden age of humanity before the genetic manipulations in which everyone was genetically pure and everything was peaceful," Nita says.
    p. 251.7
  • "If genetically pure people caused war and total devastation in the past at the same magnitude that genetically damaged people supposedly do now, then what's the basis for thinking that we need to spend so many resources and so much time working to correct genetic damage?
    p. 252.1
  • Instead of working against the poverty or crime that have run rampant over this country, these people have chosen to work against genetic damage.
    p. 252.6
  • That's another thing that Rafi showed me—examples of the propaganda the government released about genetic damage," Nita says.
    p. 252.9
  • He's been a little preoccupied with the whole 'genetic damage' thing."
    p. 256.1
  • "No one likes to be told there's something wrong with them, especially something like their genes, which they can't change."
    p. 256.3
  • They can see it in our genes.
    p. 256.4
  • "I'm not saying your genes aren't different," I say.
    p. 256.5
  • The genes for blue eyes and brown eyes are different too, but are blue eyes 'damaged'?
    p. 256.6
  • Because you have friends—and a boyfriend—with this genetic issue.
    p. 257.1
  • I know I'm fumbling for an explanation, one I may not really believe, but I say it anyway: "I guess I don't see a reason to believe in genetic damage.
    p. 257.3
  • She doesn't believe in genetic damage, like she led me to believe.
    p. 259.1
  • I don't want to spend time with Nita and Tobias together, knowing that her supposed genetic damage gives her something in common with him that I will never have.
    p. 260.2
  • Which must have been waged by genetically pure people, since genetic manipulation didn't exist back then."
    p. 264.5
  • Nita says tersely, "Their entire lives erased, against their will, for the sake of solving a genetic damage 'problem' that doesn't actually exist.
    p. 270.1
  • "—doing some genetic analysis, which is fine, but before, we were developing a way to make the memory compound behave as a virus," he says.
    p. 279.2
  • I never thought that Matthew, who went out of his way to show me the difference between my "pure" genes and Tobias's "damaged" genes, might be helping Nita.
    p. 280.8
  • I never thought that Matthew, who went out of his way to show me the difference between my "pure" genes and Tobias's "damaged" genes, might be helping Nita.
    p. 280.8
  • "Because all this 'genetic damage' nonsense is ridiculous," he says.
    p. 281.0
  • "I know this is just the fault of your genes, Nita," David says weakly.
    p. 288.9
  • A few days ago I might have disagreed with her, unsure how influential their belief in genetic damage was on their behavior.
    p. 295.9
  • The genetic anomaly that makes me aware during simulations also suggests I could be resistant to serums, so my truth serum testimony might not be reliable.
    p. 302.5
  • Given your newness to this community, your ignorance of the master plan, and your genetic deficiency, we are inclined to be lenient.
    p. 303.2
  • With the words "genetic deficiency" lingering in my mind, I nod and say, "I do."
    p. 303.6
  • "We can't have the same behavioral expectations for those with damaged genes as we do for those with pure genes, after all."
    p. 304.4
  • "We can't have the same behavioral expectations for those with damaged genes as we do for those with pure genes, after all."
    p. 304.4
  • I wanted to believe they were all wrong about me, that I was not limited by my genes, that I was no more damaged than any other person.
    p. 304.6
  • If we are going to win this fight against genetic damage, if we are going to save the experiments from being shut down, we will need to make sacrifices.
    p. 326.6
  • All the stuff about genetic damage being the cause of .... this?
    p. 345.3
  • "We believe that the best way to help our world is to fix its genetic deficiencies," Amar says, like he's reciting it from memory.
    p. 348.1
  • Which means you must be Genetic Welfare types, right?
    p. 350.4
  • "Still don't think genetic damage is to blame for any of these troubles?"
    p. 353.3
  • The Bureau is obsessed with procreation—with passing on genes.
    p. 356.9
  • I'm not obsessed with producing strong genes."
    p. 357.1
  • Another revolution in Chicago would only cement their belief that this endeavor has outlived its usefulness—something we cannot allow to happen if we want to continue to fight genetic damage.
    p. 376.2
  • To them, the people in our city are just containers of genetic material—just GDs, valuable for the corrected genes they pass on, and not for the brains in their heads or the hearts in their chests.
    p. 377.7
  • To them, the people in our city are just containers of genetic material—just GDs, valuable for the corrected genes they pass on, and not for the brains in their heads or the hearts in their chests.
    p. 377.8
  • If we are going to win this fight against genetic damage, we will need to make sacrifices.
    p. 378.1
  • It's very strange that a person's genes would make them so resistant to mind manipulation of any kind."
    p. 380.1
  • "Maybe it's not her genes," I say, shrugging.
    p. 380.2
  • As I speak, I think of the people she stands to lose—her father and mother, her sister—all those connections, forever altered or discarded, in the name of genetic purity.
    p. 393.7
  • A group of scientists told you that my genes were damaged, that there was something wrong with me—they showed you test results that proved it.
    p. 413.7
  • She, more than anything else, convinced me that the compound's position on genetic damage was twisted.
    p. 427.4
  • Only now that we are about to destroy more than an acceptable level of genetic material are they deciding to intervene.
    p. 436.4
  • That it should be done from love, not misplaced disgust for another person's genetics.
    p. 473.9
  • I wonder if she is living in a better world than the one I left, among people who no longer remember what it is to have pure genes.
    p. 488.2
  • Those lost in the memory serum haze are gathered into groups and given the truth: that human nature is complex, that all our genes are different, but neither damaged nor pure.
    p. 495.6
  • It will be the only metropolitan area in the country governed by people who don't believe in genetic damage.
    p. 504.7

There are no more uses of "gene" flagged with this meaning in Allegiant.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia Article
?  —3 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • I can't imagine isolating a gene for murder, or cowardice, or dishonesty.
    p. 121.6
  • There had been studies that indicated that violent tendencies could be partially traced to a person's genes—a gene called 'the murder gene' was the first of these, but there were quite a few more, genetic predispositions toward cowardice, dishonesty, low intelligence—all the qualities, in other words, that ultimately contribute to a broken society."
    p. 121.2
  • There had been studies that indicated that violent tendencies could be partially traced to a person's genes—a gene called 'the murder gene' was the first of these, but there were quite a few more, genetic predispositions toward cowardice, dishonesty, low intelligence—all the qualities, in other words, that ultimately contribute to a broken society."
    p. 121.2

There are no more uses of "gene" in Allegiant.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®