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utter
used in The Souls of Black Folk

7 uses
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1  —3 uses as in:
utter stupidity
Definition
complete or total (used as an intensifier—typically when stressing how bad something is)
  • Above all, nothing is more convenient than to heap on the Freedmen's Bureau all the evils of that evil day, and damn it utterly for every mistake and blunder that was made.
    Chapter 2 (79% in)
  • He is striving nobly to make Negro artisans business men and property-owners; but it is utterly impossible, under modern competitive methods, for workingmen and property-owners to defend their rights and exist without the right of suffrage.
    Chapter 3 (58% in)
  • ...without capital, without land, without skill, without economic organization, without even the bald protection of law, order, and decency,—left in a great land, not to settle down to slow and careful internal development, but destined to be thrown almost immediately into relentless and sharp competition with the best of modern workingmen under an economic system where every participant is fighting for himself, and too often utterly regardless of the rights or welfare of his neighbor.
    Chapter 9 (22% in)

There are no more uses of "utter" flagged with this meaning in The Souls of Black Folk.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary / more samples — Oxford® USDictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —4 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • But when we have vaguely said that Education will set this tangle straight, what have we uttered but a truism?
    Chapter 6 (15% in)
  • And yet the time is come when one may speak in all sincerity and utter courtesy of the mistakes and shortcomings of Mr. Washington's career, as well as of his triumphs, without being thought captious or envious, and without forgetting that it is easier to do ill than well in the world.
    Chapter 3 (14% in)
  • In a world where it means so much to take a man by the hand and sit beside him, to look frankly into his eyes and feel his heart beating with red blood; in a world where a social cigar or a cup of tea together means more than legislative halls and magazine articles and speeches,—one can imagine the consequences of the almost utter absence of such social amenities between estranged races, whose separation extends even to parks and streetcars.
    Chapter 9 (87% in)
  • Three short series of verses have always attracted me,—the one that heads this chapter, of one line of which Thomas Wentworth Higginson has fittingly said, "Never, it seems to me, since man first lived and suffered was his infinite longing for peace uttered more plaintively."
    Chapter 14 (77% in)

There are no more uses of "utter" in The Souls of Black Folk.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®