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joust
used in The Once and Future King

37 uses
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Definition
a contest in which knights attempt to knock each other off horses with blunted lances

or:

any kind of contest
  • Sir Grummore Grummursum is on the way to challenge you to a joust.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (28% in)
joust = a contest in which knights attempt to knock each other off horses with blunted lances
  • He was mounted on an enormous white horse that stood as rapt as its master, and he carried in his right hand, with its butt resting on the stirrup, a high, smooth jousting lance, which stood up among the tree stumps, higher and higher, till it was outlined against the velvet sky.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (7% in)
  • He clutched his jousting lance in his right hand, and galloped off in the direction of the noise.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (9% in)
  • The girths stood the test and he was in the saddle somehow, with his jousting lance between his legs, and then he was galloping round and round the tree, in the opposite direction to the one in which the brachet had wound herself up.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (9% in)
  • When two knights jousted they held their lances in their right hands, but they directed their horses at one another so that each man had his opponent on his near side.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (24% in)
  • This was the humblest or least skilful blow in jousting.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (24% in)
  • A good jouster, like Lancelot or Tristram, always used the blow of the point, because, although it was liable to miss in unskilful hands, it made contact sooner.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (24% in)
  • But it would have been impossible to make a spear one hundred yards long and, if made, impossible to carry it The jouster had to find out the greatest length which he could manage with the greatest speed, and he had to stick to that Sir Lancelot, who came some time after this part of the story, had several sizes of spears and would call for his Great Spear or his Lesser Spear as occasion demanded.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (25% in)
  • Just outside Sir Ector's castle there was a jousting field for tournaments, although there had been no tournaments in it since Kay was born.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (25% in)
  • And I should have hoved at a well or a ford or something and made all true knights that came that way to joust with me for the honour of their ladies, and I should have spared them all after I had given them a great fall.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (26% in)
  • And I should live out of doors all the year round in a pavilion, and never do anything but joust and go on quests and bear away the prize at tournaments, and I should not ever tell anybody my name.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (26% in)
  • Sir What-you-may-call-it coming here to challenge me to a joust?
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (28% in)
  • Sir Grummore looked at Merlyn—magicians were considered rather middle-class by the true jousting set in those days—and said distantly, "Ah, a magician.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (28% in)
  • Suppose we'd better have a joust, eh, what?
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (28% in)
  • Then you must stay and joust with me, false knight.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (29% in)
  • Then thou shalt stay and joust with me, false knight.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (29% in)
  • You never know what will happen in a joust like this.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (29% in)
  • "Oh, dear!" exclaimed the Wart, feeling ashamed that his blood-thirstiness had been responsible for making these two knights joust before him.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (29% in)
  • "You see," explained King Pellinore blushing, as he sat down with everybody whacking him on the back, "old Grummore invited me home, what, after we had been having a pleasant joust together, and since then I've been letting my beastly Beast go and hang itself on the wall, what?"
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (65% in)
  • As you were that day when we went to watch King Pellinore's joust?
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (86% in)
  • Can't joust without a sword," said Sir Grummore.
    Book 1 -- The Sword in the Stone (97% in)
  • Although nine tenths of the story seems to be about knights jousting and quests for the holy grail and things of that sort, the narrative is a whole, and it deals with the reasons why the young man came to grief at the end.
    Book 2 -- The Queen of Air and Darkness (**% in)
  • But you have to remember that people cant be good at cricket unless they teach themselves to be so, and that jousting was an art, just as cricket is.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (2% in)
  • Lancelot had never ridden a serious joust before—and, although he had charged at hundreds of quintains and thousands of rings, he had never taken his life in his hands in earnest.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (7% in)
  • But the trouble is that he has got so valiant since he married the Queen's daughter of Flanders that he has taken to jousting in earnest, and quite often wins.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (9% in)
  • At the present period of his life he had only fought one joust with Arthur himself, and the accepted captain of the knights was Gawaine.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (12% in)
  • A real tournament was distinct from a joust.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (16% in)
  • In a joust the knights tilted or fenced with each other singly, for a prize.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (16% in)
  • These mass battles were considered to be important—for instance, once you had paid your green fee for the tournament, you were admitted on the same ticket to fight in the jousts—but if you had only paid the jousting fee, you were not allowed to fight in the tourney.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (16% in)
  • As it turned out, Turquine did sit better when it came to the tilt, so that this particular criticism came to nothing—but it throws a sidelight on jousting and may have been worth mentioning.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (19% in)
  • They jousted with him, and Galahad gave them both a fall.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (68% in)
  • He had been killed by a black knight at a ford—he had jousted with his own son, who had broken his neck—he had gone mad again, after being beaten by his son, and was riding overthwart and endlong—his armour had been stolen by a mysterious knight, and he had been eaten by a beast—he had fought against two hundred and fifty knights, been taken captive, and hanged like a dog.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (70% in)
  • I jousted with him and retrieved the armour.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (75% in)
  • I rode to the water of Mortoise, where a black knight came to joust with me.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (75% in)
  • For an ordinary joust there would have been a barrier: but in this case the fight was to be a outrance, which meant that it might end with swords on foot, and so the barrier was left out.
    Book 3 -- The Ill-Made Knight (83% in)
  • I may be a weak knight at jousting, but I have the courage to stand for my family and rights.
    Book 4 -- The Candle in the Wind (8% in)
  • She remembered it as a bridge of great personality, what with the houses and the heads of rebels on spikes and the place where Sir David had fought a full-dress joust with the Lord Welles.
    Book 4 -- The Candle in the Wind (72% in)

There are no more uses of "joust" in The Once and Future King.

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