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altitude
used in October Sky

24 uses
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Definition
elevation (height) — typically above sea level or above the earth's surface

or:

(metaphorically) a desirable height
  • It had been designed to reach an altitude of five miles.
    Chapter 26 (84% in)
altitude = elevation (height)
  • "We've built a range—Cape Coalwood—and we're starting to get some altitude.
    Chapter 10 (71% in)
  • If his theodolite worked, trigonometry would give us the altitude of our rocket.
    Chapter 11 (26% in)
  • O'Dell knocked over Quentin's theodolite in his excitement, so we didn't get an altitude estimate, but it was obvious it hadn't gone as high as Auk XII.
    Chapter 11 (31% in)
  • In fact, it managed only half the altitude.
    Chapter 12 (80% in)
  • Although the machinists were still thrilled by it, Quentin and I worried over its performance all week, trying to figure out what had cut into its altitude.
    Chapter 12 (80% in)
  • Two observation points made the trig more accurate, and Quentin calculated that the two-footers reached an altitude of around three thousand feet, the three-footer around two thousand feet, an observation that confirmed our suspicions on rocket performance and their size.
    Chapter 14 (80% in)
  • When going for altitude, bigger wasn't always better.
    Chapter 14 (81% in)
  • No matter what we do, we're not going to gain any more altitude.
    Chapter 15 (76% in)
  • I figured we'd get a little increase in altitude as a result.
    Chapter 16 (36% in)
  • We're going for maximum altitude.
    Chapter 19 (85% in)
  • If one assumed a rocket took approximately the same time to reach altitude as it did to come back down—a good assumption, since zincoshine burned so fast our rockets were essentially free flyers the moment they left the pad—then dividing the total time of flight in half, squaring it, and multiplying the result by sixteen gave us a rough estimate of the altitude reached.
    Chapter 21 (58% in)
  • If one assumed a rocket took approximately the same time to reach altitude as it did to come back down—a good assumption, since zincoshine burned so fast our rockets were essentially free flyers the moment they left the pad—then dividing the total time of flight in half, squaring it, and multiplying the result by sixteen gave us a rough estimate of the altitude reached.
    Chapter 21 (58% in)
  • We were committed to the glory of pure altitude.
    Chapter 22 (15% in)
  • "Let's just see what it takes to double our altitude," he said.
    Chapter 22 (16% in)
  • The same equation we'd used to calculate altitude based on time was the one we needed first, good old S = Żat2.
    Chapter 22 (16% in)
  • I did the calculations, assuming our rocket reached maximum velocity immediately upon launch and rounding off the altitude to ten thousand feet.
    Chapter 22 (17% in)
  • We want our rocket to go to an altitude of precisely two miles.
    Chapter 22 (22% in)
  • It was a stretch version of Auk XXIII, with a foot of length tacked on to see what difference it would make in altitude.
    Chapter 22 (70% in)
  • That would reduce altitude.
    Chapter 22 (71% in)
  • Nervously, we set up the display, which consisted of a three-hinged fiberboard on which I had taped a number of posters showing nozzle calculations, the parabolic trajectory of our rockets, and the trigonometry we had used to calculate altitudes.
    Chapter 23 (49% in)
  • Every day I honed my spiel a little more so that I could quickly deliver a learned presentation on the mathematics of the design of De Laval nozzles, the calculations of specific impulse and mass ratios, and the trigonometry of altitudes needed for an amateur rocketry test range.
    Chapter 25 (3% in)
  • Three thousand feet, we all agreed, and the altitude was reported to the crowd, which ooohed and ahhhed appropriately.
    Chapter 26 (71% in)
  • Assuming it was flying nearly vertical, Auk XXXI had disappeared at an altitude of thirty-one thousand feet, nearly six miles high.
    Chapter 26 (95% in)

There are no more uses of "altitude" in October Sky.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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