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mockery
used in A Prayer for Owen Meany

12 uses
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Definition
ridicule (to make fun of)

or:

something so inadequate it is ridiculous (silly)
  • Look: I have never mocked your belief—have I?
    p. 526.9
  • We had never had a pet—my grandmother thought that people who kept pets were engaged in the basest form of self-mockery, intentionally putting themselves on a level with animals.
    p. 49.3
  • She did not report this to mock Owen, and—as a testimony to my cousins' basically decent natures—the news was not greeted with their usual rowdiness, which I associated with Sawyer Depot as firmly as various forms of skiing and collision.
    p. 78.6
  • I stared into the darkness of the mock flying buttresses for some reassuring glimpse of the Announcing Angel; but Harold Crosby was invisible—he was hidden, doubtless in fear and trembling, above the "pillar of light."
    p. 219.3
  • I was aware that Barb Wiggin had cranked Harold Crosby up so high that he was completely gone from view; up in the dark dust, up in the gloom inspired by the mock flying buttresses, Harold Crosby, who was still probably facing the wrong way, was flapping like a stranded bat—but I couldn't see him.
    p. 221.6
  • "I know you're upset; I'm not mocking you.
    p. 229.0
  • Harold Crosby, who thought both his God and Barb Wiggin had abandoned him forever, swung like the victim of a vigilante killing among the mock flying buttresses; Dan, an accomplished mechanic of all theatrical equipment, eventually mastered the angel-lowering apparatus and returned the banished angel to terra firma, where Harold collapsed in relief and gratitude.
    p. 234.7
  • Canon Mackie read heavily from Matthew: how they mocked Jesus, how they spit on him, how he cried, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"
    p. 283.1
  • CRUEL AND DELIBERATE MOCKERY IS WORSE THAN DRINKING; STUDENTS WHO BAIT AND MERCILESSLY TEASE THEIR FELLOW STUDENTS ARE GUILTY OF WHAT SHOULD BE A MORE 'PUNISHABLE OFFENSE' THAN GETTING DRUNK—ESPECIALLY IN THOSE INSTANCES WHEN YOUR DRUNKENNESS HURTS NO ONE BUT YOURSELF."
    p. 296.6
  • Everyone was talking about Kennedy or Nixon; and it was Owen who initiated a mock election among the Gravesend Academy students—he organized it, he set up the balloting in the school post office, he seated himself behind a big table and checked off every student's name.
    p. 338.3
  • He wouldn't tell me much else about the sessions, but he liked to mock some of the questions Dr. Dolder had asked him by exaggerating the doctor's accent.
    p. 389.7
  • Hester the Molester likes crucifixes, or else she likes to mock them—all kinds, all sizes; around her neck and in her ears.
    p. 522.6

There are no more uses of "mockery" in A Prayer for Owen Meany.

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