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grotesque
used in A Prayer for Owen Meany

4 uses
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Definition
distorted and unnatural in shape or size — especially in a disturbing way

or:

ugly, gross, or very wrong
  • There's nothing grotesque, or mangled—or even raw-looking—about the stump.
    p. 540.8
  • In the rear of the nave, rendered even more insignificant than usual by his proximity to the giant painting of "The Call of the Twelve," pudgy Harold Crosby sat diminished by the depiction of Jesus appointing his disciples; all eyes rarely feasted on fat Harold Crosby, who was not grotesque enough to be teased—or even noticed—but who was enough of a slob to be rejected whenever he caused the slightest attention to be drawn to himself.
    p. 166.1
  • And he was not at morning meeting on that February day, just before spring vacation; but the surrogate he had left onstage was grotesquely capable of holding our attention.
    p. 415.7
  • I was surprised that he had never unpackaged all the baseball cards that he had so symbolically delivered to me, and that I'd returned to him; I was surprised at how withered and grotesque were my armadillo's amputated claws—they had once seemed such treasures, and now, in addition to their ugliness, they even appeared much smaller than I'd remembered them.
    p. 544.4

There are no more uses of "grotesque" in A Prayer for Owen Meany.

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