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wither
used in A Prayer for Owen Meany

4 uses
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Definition
to shrivel (wrinkle and contract — usually from lack of water)

or:

to become weaker; or feel humiliated
  • There was still a lot of snow on the ground that spring—old, dead-gray snow—and I was opening another beer for Dan and myself in the kitchen at 80 Front Street, when I happened to look out the kitchen window at the withered rose garden, and there was Mr. Meany!
    p. 583.9
  • There had been a brief and abandoned plan to have a dance floor put on the brick terrace, but this plan withered in a disagreement concerning the proper music—and a good thing, too, my grandmother concluded; she meant it was a good thing that there was no dancing in such humid weather.
    p. 121.8
  • What the congregation saw was the Holy Mother roll out of the hay pile and across the floor of the manger, where she collected herself at a safe distance from the unpredictable Prince of Peace; Owen withered Mary Beth with a look as scornful as the look he'd shown Barb Wiggin.
    p. 223.3
  • I was surprised that he had never unpackaged all the baseball cards that he had so symbolically delivered to me, and that I'd returned to him; I was surprised at how withered and grotesque were my armadillo's amputated claws—they had once seemed such treasures, and now, in addition to their ugliness, they even appeared much smaller than I'd remembered them.
    p. 544.4

There are no more uses of "wither" in A Prayer for Owen Meany.

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