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stereotype
used in A Prayer for Owen Meany

7 uses
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Definition
to classify someone or something with an oversimplified set of characteristics — especially incorrectly

or:

someone or something representing such a classification
  • Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, for example; they were an education in condescension to women—all by themselves, they created sexual stereotypes!
    p. 245.1
  • Amanda Dowling was a pioneer in challenging sexual stereotypes; she wore men's clothes—fancy dress, for her, meant a coat and tie—and when she smoked, she blew smoke in men's faces, this being at the heart of her opinions regarding how men behaved toward women.
    p. 243.9
  • Both her husband and Amanda were in favor of creating mayhem with sexual stereotypes, or reversing sexual roles as arduously and as self-consciously as possible—hence, he often wore an apron while shopping; hence, her hair was shorter than his, except on her legs and in her armpits, where she grew it long.
    p. 244.1
  • They were childless—Dan Needham suggested that their sexual roles might be so "reversed" as to make childbearing difficult—and their attendance at Little League games was marked by a constant disapproval of the sport: that little girls were not allowed to play in the Little League was an example of sexual stereotyping that exercised the Dowlings' humorlessness and fury.
    p. 244.4
  • Sexual stereotypes did not fall, she liked to say, from the clear blue sky; books were the major influences upon children—and books that had boys being boys, and girls being girls, were among the worst offenders!
    p. 244.9
  • She was more ambitious than he was, befitting a woman determined to reverse sexual stereotypes; she thought that speaking parts for males were perfect for her.
    p. 245.3
  • "You're very original, but the dream is a stereotype—the dream is stupid.
    p. 483.5

There are no more uses of "stereotype" in A Prayer for Owen Meany.

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