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oppress
used in Letter from a Birmingham Jail

8 uses
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1  —2 uses as in:
oppressive government
Definition
to dominate harshly and unfairly; or to make suffer
The meaning of oppress depends upon its context. For example:
  • "The authorities oppress political activists," or "The new nation oppressed Native Americans." — to dominate harshly and unfairly
  • "She is oppressed by excessive debt." - made to suffer
  • We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor;
oppressor = one who denies equal rights to others
  • I suppose I should have realized that few members of the oppressor race can understand the deep groans and passionate yearnings of the oppressed race, and still fewer have the vision to see that injustice must be rooted out by strong, persistent and determined action.

There are no more uses of "oppress" flagged with this meaning in Letter from a Birmingham Jail.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —6 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • Oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever.
  • We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed.
  • One is a force of complacency, made up in part of Negroes who, as a result of long years of oppression, are so drained of self respect and a sense of "somebodiness" that they have adjusted to segregation; and in part of a few middle-class Negroes who, because of a degree of academic and economic security and because in some ways they profit by segregation, have become insensitive to the problems of the masses.
  • Oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever.
  • I suppose I should have realized that few members of the oppressor race can understand the deep groans and passionate yearnings of the oppressed race, and still fewer have the vision to see that injustice must be rooted out by strong, persistent and determined action.
  • They will be old, oppressed, battered Negro women, symbolized in a seventy two year old woman in Montgomery, Alabama, who rose up with a sense of dignity and with her people decided not to ride segregated buses, and who responded with ungrammatical profundity to one who inquired about her weariness: "My feets is tired, but my soul is at rest."

There are no more uses of "oppress" in Letter from a Birmingham Jail.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®