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derive
used in Do You Speak American?

7 uses
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Definition
to get something from something else

(If the context doesn't otherwise indicate where something came from, it is generally from reasoning—especially deductive reasoning.)
  • It is one of the "r"-less speech patterns deriving from some of the earliest English settlers, who did not pronounce the "r" in words like father.
    two — Changing Dialects: Dingbatters Versus Hoi-Toiders (13% in)
  • [Down East derives from sailing days, when going east usually meant sailing downwind) He says, "I listen to all the little kids that hang around my grandchildren and I don't hear it.
    two — Changing Dialects: Dingbatters Versus Hoi-Toiders (7% in)
  • Smith Island's dialect is close to that on nearby Tangier Island, Virginia, so close that their common name for each other is yarney, derived from yarnin', or telling tales.
    two — Changing Dialects: Dingbatters Versus Hoi-Toiders (25% in)
  • FDR's speech was the model of an international English standard derived from the British Received Pronunciation that took its form in London, at the beginning of the nineteenth century.
    three — Toward a Standard: Putting the "R" in "American" (7% in)
  • Looking it up, we found that Fowler's Modern English Usage says the word gerundive has "no proper function in English grammar," but the Random House Unabridged Dictionary finds one: a gerund is a noun derived from a verb form—for instance, walking, as in walking is good for you.
    three — Toward a Standard: Putting the "R" in "American" (65% in)
  • Linguistically, Cajun includes expressions derived from French (co jaire for why?
    four — This Ain't Your Mama's South Anymore (64% in)
  • The first generation of research surmised that blacks' speech derived from pieces of dialects brought by their slave owners from different parts of England.
    six — Bad-mouthing Black English (6% in)

There are no more uses of "derive" in Do You Speak American?.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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