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phenomenon
used in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

17 uses
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Definition
something that exists or happened — especially something of special interest — sometimes someone or something that is extraordinary
  • The success of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance seems the result of this culture-bearing phenomenon.
    Afterward (26% in)
  • I've noticed that people who have never worked with steel have trouble seeing this...that the motorcycle is primarily a mental phenomenon.
    Part 2 (6% in)
  • "Nobody," he said, "who has really gone into the matter will deny that in practice the world of phenomena uniquely determines the theoretical system, in spite of the fact that there is no theoretical bridge between phenomena and their theoretical principles."
    Part 2 (20% in)
  • "Nobody," he said, "who has really gone into the matter will deny that in practice the world of phenomena uniquely determines the theoretical system, in spite of the fact that there is no theoretical bridge between phenomena and their theoretical principles."
    Part 2 (20% in)
  • He coined a law intended to have the humor of a Parkinson's law that "The number of rational hypotheses that can explain any given phenomenon is infinite.
    Part 2 (20% in)
  • What Phaedrus observed on a personal level was a phenomenon, profoundly characteristic of the history of science, which has been swept under the carpet for years.
    Part 2 (22% in)
  • No one that Phaedrus talked to seemed really concerned about this phenomenon that so baffled him.
    Part 2 (24% in)
  • He had seen it as a kind of scientific phenomenon that might offer clues leading to new understanding, and DeWeese had just laughed.
    Part 2 (50% in)
  • Then a hoped-for phenomenon began.
    Part 3 (8% in)
  • After midquarter an even more hoped-for phenomenon took place.
    Part 3 (9% in)
  • The phenomenon of relaxation and friendliness was explained later by a couple of students who told him, "A lot of us got together outside of class to try to figure out how to beat this system.
    Part 3 (9% in)
  • Here again there was little duplication but another kind of phenomenon.
    Part 3 (51% in)
  • True, there were still unexplained phenomena such as radioactivity, transmission of light through the "ether," and the peculiar relationship of magnetic to electric forces; but these, if past trends were any indication, had eventually to fall.
    Part 3 (52% in)
  • Poincaré wrote, "If a phenomenon admits of a complete mechanical explanation it will admit of an infinity of others which will account equally well for all the peculiarities disclosed by experiment."
    Part 3 (55% in)
  • Mu is the "phenomenon" that inspires scientific enquiry in the first place!
    Part 3 (96% in)
  • He had built empires of scientific capability to manipulate the phenomena of nature into enormous manifestations of his own dreams of power and wealth...but for this he had exchanged an empire of understanding of equal magnitude: an understanding of what it is to be a part of the world, and not an enemy of it.
    Part 4 (61% in)
  • This is why Plato finds it necessary to separate, for example, "horseness" from "horse" and say that horseness is real and fixed and true and unmoving, while the horse is a mere, unimportant, transitory phenomenon.
    Part 4 (63% in)

There are no more uses of "phenomenon" in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

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