toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

feud
used in Outliers

7 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
bitter hostile argument between two parties — typically long-standing between families or tribes with occasional incidents of violence
  • And these were just the well-known feuds.
    Chapter 6 (27% in)
  • Suppose you were sent to Harlan in the late nineteenth century to investigate the causes of the Howard-Turner feud.
    Chapter 6 (20% in)
  • In the famous Hatfield-McCoy feud on the West Virginia-Kentucky border not far from Harlan, several dozen people were killed in a cycle of violence that stretched over twenty years.
    Chapter 6 (24% in)
  • In the French-Eversole feud in Perry County, Kentucky, twelve died, six of them killed by "Bad Tom" Smith (a man, John Ed Pearce writes in Days of Darkness, who was "just dumb enough to be fearless, just bright enough to be dangerous, and a dead shot").
    Chapter 6 (24% in)
  • The Martin-Tolliver feud, in Rowan County, Kentucky, in the mid-1880s featured three gunfights, three ambushes, and two house attacks, and ended in a two-hour gun battle involving one hundred armed men.
    Chapter 6 (25% in)
  • The Baker-Howard feud in Clay County, Kentucky, began in 1806, with an elk-hunting party gone bad, and didn't end until the 1930s, when a couple of Howards killed three Bakers in an ambush.
    Chapter 6 (26% in)
  • When one family fights with another, it's a feud.
    Chapter 6 (32% in)

There are no more uses of "feud" in Outliers.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Wikipedia Article