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rogue
used in Tom Jones

11 uses
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Definition
not normal and possibly dangerous — possibly alone
The exact meaning of rogue can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "a rogue state" — (politics) a dangerous country that ignores international conventions
  • "a rogue animal" — (especially of an elephant) dangerous and not living with or like its kind
  • "a rogue trader" — (finance) an employee who makes unauthorized and improper securities trades
  • "a rogue wave" — (oceanography) a dangerous wave that is much larger than others around it
  • "rogue cells" — (biology) tumor cells
  • "He is a rouge." — someone who is deceitful and unprincipled (though possibly liked despite that)
  • The worst of men generally have the words rogue and villain most in their mouths, as the lowest of all wretches are the aptest to cry out low in the pit.
    Book 7 (5% in)
  • Tom, however, cautiously avoided all engagements with that youth; for besides that Tommy Jones was an inoffensive lad amidst all his roguery, and really loved Blifil, Mr Thwackum being always the second of the latter, would have been sufficient to deter him.
    Book 3 (37% in)
  • An instance of this may, I believe, be seen in those gentlemen who have the misfortune to have any of their rogueries detected; for here discovery seldom stops till the whole is come out.
    Book 3 (83% in)
  • Our modern authors of comedy have fallen almost universally into the error here hinted at; their heroes generally are notorious rogues, and their heroines abandoned jades, during the first four acts; but in the fifth, the former become very worthy gentlemen, and the latter women of virtue and discretion: nor is the writer often so kind as to give himself the least trouble to reconcile or account for this monstrous change and incongruity.
    Book 8 (7% in)
  • There is, indeed, no other reason to be assigned for it, than because the play is drawing to a conclusion; as if it was no less natural in a rogue to repent in the last act of a play, than in the last of his life; which we perceive to be generally the case at Tyburn, a place which might indeed close the scene of some comedies with much propriety, as the heroes in these are most commonly eminent for those very talents which not only bring men to the gallows, but enable them to make an...
    Book 8 (8% in)
  • Now, as the honesty of Partridge was equal to his understanding, and both dealt only in small matters, he would never have attempted a roguery of this kind, had he not imagined it altogether safe; for he was one of those who have more consideration of the gallows than of the fitness of things; but, in reality, he thought he might have committed this felony without any danger; for, besides that he doubted not but the name of Mr Allworthy would sufficiently quiet the landlord, he...
    Book 10 (55% in)
  • ...wonder that servants (I mean among the men only) should have so great regard for the reputation of the wealth of their masters, and little or none at all for their character in other points, and that, though they would be ashamed to be the footman of a beggar, they are not so to attend upon a rogue or a blockhead; and do consequently make no scruple to spread the fame of the iniquities and follies of their said masters as far as possible, and this often with great humour and merriment.
    Book 12 (39% in)
  • And now, looking upon his companion with a contemptuous and disdainful air (a thing not usual with him), he cried, "Partridge, I see thou art a conceited old fool, and I wish thou art not likewise an old rogue.
    Book 12 (92% in)
  • Partridge certainly saw it in that light; for he testified much dissatisfaction on the occasion, quoted an old proverb, and said, he should not wonder if the rogue attacked them again before they reached London.
    Book 12 (98% in)
  • And to be sure it would be better that all rogues were hanged out of the way, than that one honest man should suffer.
    Book 12 (99% in)
  • This I faithfully promise, that, notwithstanding any affection which we may be supposed to have for this rogue, whom we have unfortunately made our heroe, we will lend him none of that supernatural assistance with which we are entrusted, upon condition that we use it only on very important occasions.
    Book 17 (2% in)

There are no more uses of "rogue" in Tom Jones.

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