toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

audacious
used in Tom Jones

5 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
bold and daring (inclined to take risks) — especially in violating social convention in a manner that could offend others
  • Nay," said Mr Allworthy to him, "your audacious attempt to steal away the young lady, calls upon me to justify my own character in punishing you.
    Book 6 (78% in)
  • However, what she withheld from the infant, she bestowed with the utmost profuseness on the poor unknown mother, whom she called an impudent slut, a wanton hussy, an audacious harlot, a wicked jade, a vile strumpet, with every other appellation with which the tongue of virtue never fails to lash those who bring a disgrace on the sex.
    Book 1 (26% in)
  • When Mrs Deborah, putting on the gravity of a judge, with somewhat more than his austerity, began an oration with the words, "You audacious strumpet!" in which she proceeded rather to pass sentence on the prisoner than to accuse her.
    Book 1 (38% in)
  • The other lady put on one of her most malicious sneers, and said, "Creature! you are below my anger; and it is beneath me to give ill words to such an audacious saucy trollop; but, hussy, I must tell you, your breeding shows the meanness of your birth as well as of your education; and both very properly qualify you to be the mean serving-woman of a country girl.
    Book 7 (43% in)
  • "And, madam," continued she, "I could have despised all she said to me; but she hath had the audacity to affront your ladyship, and to call you ugly—Yes, madam, she called you ugly old cat to my face.
    Book 7 (44% in)

There are no more uses of "audacious" in Tom Jones.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®