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accord
used in Sophie's World

2 meanings, 79 uses
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1  —73 uses as in:
according to, or in accord with
Definition
in keeping with; or in agreement/harmony/unity with
This sense of accord is often seen in the form according to or accordingly where it can take on more specific meanings. For example:
  • "According to Kim, ..." — as stated by
  • "To each according to her ability." — based upon
  • "Points are scored according to how well they perform." — depending upon
  • "The dose is calculated according to body weight." — in proportion to
  • "We got a flat tire. Accordingly, I pulled to the side of the road." — because of what was just said; or as a result
  • Only then will you be acting in accordance with the moral law within you.
    24 — Kant (66% in)
accordance = keeping with
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • According to Anaximenes, air was therefore the origin of earth, water, and fire.
    4 — The Natural Philosophers (40% in)
  • According to Democritus, there is no conscious "design" in the movement of atoms.
    5 — Democritus (73% in)
  • The founder of Greek medicine is said to have been Hippocrates, who was born on the island of Cos around 460 B.C. The most essential safeguards against sickness, according to the Hippocratic medical tradition, were moderation and a healthy lifestyle.
    6 — Fate (84% in)
  • There is a lot of talk today about "medical ethics," which is another way of saying that a doctor must practice medicine according to certain ethical rules.
    6 — Fate (87% in)
  • He required his pupils to take the following oath: I will follow that system or regimen which, according to my ability and judgment, I consider to be for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous.
    6 — Fate (89% in)
  • According to Plato, man is a dual creature.
    9 — Plato (63% in)
  • According to Plato, the human body is composed of three parts: the head, the chest, and the abdomen.
    9 — Plato (83% in)
  • According to Plato, the soul had "seen" the "idea" chicken before it took up residence in a body.
    10 — The Major's Cabin (77% in)
  • According to Aristotle, Plato was trapped in a mythical world picture in which the human imagination was confused with the real world.
    11 — Aristotle (21% in)
  • On the contrary, it is precisely reason, according to Aristotle, that is man's most distinguishing characteristic.
    11 — Aristotle (25% in)
  • Every change in nature, according to Aristotle, is a transformation of substance from the "potential" to the "actual."
    11 — Aristotle (28% in)
  • According to Aristotle, nonliving things can only change through external influence.
    11 — Aristotle (58% in)
  • At the top of this "scale" is man—who according to Aristotle lives the whole life of nature.
    11 — Aristotle (63% in)
  • According to Aristotle, man's "form" comprises a soul, which has a plant-like part, an animal part, and a rational part.
    11 — Aristotle (65% in)
  • According to Plotinus, the soul is illuminated by the light from the One, while matter is the darkness that has no real existence.
    12 — Hellenism (77% in)
  • Your real "I"— which you can only experience if you are able to lose yourself—is, according to the mystics, like a mysterious fire that goes on burning to all eternity.
    12 — Hellenism (88% in)
  • According to Christian teachings, Jesus was the only righteous person who ever lived.
    14 — Two Cultures (70% in)
  • According to Christianity there is nothing in man—no "soul," for example— that is in itself immortal.
    14 — Two Cultures (73% in)
  • For a time he was influenced by Stoic philosophy, and according to the Stoics, there was no sharp division between good and evil.
    15 — The Middle Ages (48% in)
  • According to St. Augustine, the entire human race was lost after the Fall of Man.
    15 — The Middle Ages (56% in)
  • According to Aquinas, there was a progressive degree of existence from plants and animals to man, from man to angels, and from angels to God.
    15 — The Middle Ages (88% in)
  • According to Aquinas, these views harmonized with the message of the Bible—which, for example, tells us that woman was made out of Adam's rib.
    15 — The Middle Ages (93% in)
  • We can moreover note that, according to Aquinas, it is only as nature-being that woman is inferior to man.
    15 — The Middle Ages (93% in)
  • According to Luther, people did not need the intercession of the church or its priests in order to receive God's forgiveness.
    16 — The Renaissance (90% in)
  • According to him, souls were built up of atoms that are spread to the winds when people die.
    17 — The Baroque (43% in)
  • According to Descartes, the idea of God is innate, it is stamped on us from birth 'like the artisan's mark stamped on his product.'
    18 — Descartes (49% in)
  • According to Descartes, this is just as certain as it is inherent in the idea of a circle that all points of the circle are equidistant from the center.
    18 — Descartes (51% in)
  • According to Descartes, the human body is a perfect machine.
    18 — Descartes (66% in)
  • According to Spinoza, we humans recognize two of God's qualities or manifestations.
    19 — Spinoza (42% in)
  • But your thumb can only move according to its nature.
    19 — Spinoza (58% in)
  • But she also lives according to the laws of nature.
    19 — Spinoza (75% in)
  • According to Spinoza, this tree is free.
    19 — Spinoza (79% in)
  • So, according to Hume, an 'angel' is a complex idea.
    21 — Hume (12% in)
  • According to Hume and Buddha, yes.
    21 — Hume (47% in)
  • According to Hume, a miracle is against the laws of nature.
    21 — Hume (54% in)
  • But according to Hume, it is not reason that determines what we say and do.
    21 — Hume (85% in)
  • According to Hume, everybody has a feeling for other people's welfare.
    21 — Hume (86% in)
  • Alberto continued: "According to Berkeley, my own soul can be the cause of my own ideas—just as when I dream—but only another will or spirit can be the cause of the ideas that make up the 'corporeal' world.
    22 — Berkeley (10% in)
  • According to Berkeley, all we can know is that we are spirit.
    22 — Berkeley (18% in)
  • Now the Enlightenment philosophers saw it as their duty to lay a foundation for morals, religion, and ethics in accordance with man's immutable reason.
    23 — The Enlightenent (67% in)
  • According to the Enlightenment philosophers, what religion needed was to be stripped of all the irrational dogmas or doctrines that had got attached to the simple teachings of Jesus during the course of ecclesiastical history.
    23 — The Enlightenent (78% in)
  • You mean they lived according to their philosophy?
    23 — The Enlightenent (81% in)
  • And even the law of causality—which Hume believed man could not experience—belongs to the mind, according to Kant.
    24 — Kant (24% in)
  • According to Hume, we cannot per-ceive the black billiard ball as being the cause of the white ball's movement.
    24 — Kant (25% in)
  • According to Kant, there are two elements that contribute to man's knowledge of the world.
    24 — Kant (33% in)
  • When you put the red glasses on, we demonstrated that according to Kant there are two elements that contribute to our knowledge of the world.
    24 — Kant (39% in)
  • This was another case of human reason being unable to make a certain judgment, according to Kant.
    24 — Kant (46% in)
  • According to Kant, everybody has 'practical reason,' that is, the intelligence that gives us the capacity to discern what is right or wrog in every case.
    24 — Kant (61% in)
  • According to Kant, the law of morals is just as absolute and just as universal as the law of causality.
    24 — Kant (68% in)
  • You might be acting in accordance with moral law—and that could be fair enough—but if it is to be a moral action, you must have conquered yourself.
    24 — Kant (70% in)
  • You acted out of good will, and according to Kant, it is this good will which determines whether or not the action was morally right, not the consequences of the action.
    24 — Kant (72% in)
  • Not according to Kant.
    24 — Kant (74% in)
  • According to Kant, the artist plays freely on his faculty of cognition.
    25 — Romanticism (26% in)
  • According to Hegel, history is the story of the 'world spirit' gradually coming to consciousness of itself.
    26 — Hegel (38% in)
  • According to Hegel, the study of history shows that humanity is moving toward greater rationality and freedom.
    26 — Hegel (40% in)
  • According to Hegel, the state is 'more' than the individual citizen.
    26 — Hegel (90% in)
  • According to Hegel, it is not the individual that finds itself, it is the world spirit.
    26 — Hegel (91% in)
  • According to Kierkegaard, rather than searching for the Truth with a capital T, it is more important to find the kind of truths that are meaningful to the individual's life.
    27 — Kierkegaard (56% in)
  • And what, according to Kierkegaard, is a man?
    27 — Kierkegaard (59% in)
  • Things we can know through reason, or knowledge, are according to Kierkegaard totally unimportant.
    27 — Kierkegaard (69% in)
  • According to Kierkegaard, angst is almost positive.
    27 — Kierkegaard (89% in)
  • But according to Marx, Hegel was standing on his head.
    28 — Marx (43% in)
  • No, the question of what was morally right, according to Marx, is a product of the base of society.
    28 — Marx (57% in)
  • In this kind of society, the policy is 'from each according to his abilities, to each according to his needs.'
    28 — Marx (89% in)
  • In this kind of society, the policy is 'from each according to his abilities, to each according to his needs.'
    28 — Marx (89% in)
  • Most geologists swore to a 'catastrophe theory/ according to which the earth had been subjected to gigantic floods, earthquakes, and other catastrophes that had destroyed all life.
    29 — Darwin (25% in)
  • But according to Darwinism, no such inherited characteristic would be passed on.
    29 — Darwin (65% in)
  • In a similar way, the psychoanalyst, with the patients help, can dig deep into the patient's mind and bring to light the experiences that have caused the patient's psychological disorder, since according to Freud, we store the memory of all our experiences deep inside us.
    30 — Freud (22% in)
  • Because this guilt feeling remains in the superego, many people—according to Freud, most people—feel guilty about sex all their lives.
    30 — Freud (30% in)
  • According to Freud, the royal road to the unconscious is our dreams.
    30 — Freud (57% in)
  • According to Nietzsche, both Christianity and traditional philosophy had turned away from the real world and pointed toward 'heaven' or 'the world of ideas.'
    31 — Our Own Time (34% in)
  • But according to Sartre, man has no such innate 'nature.'
    31 — Our Own Time (40% in)

There are no more uses of "accord" flagged with this meaning in Sophie's World.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
2  —6 uses as in:
done of her own accord
Definition
mind
  • people in his time were deeply fascinated by machines and the workings of clocks, which appeared to have the ability to function of their own accord.
    18 — Descartes (74% in)
own accord = own mind (voluntarily without anyone making it do so)
Other Uses (with this meaning)
  • Man thought it was so astonishing to be alive that philosophical questions arose of their own accord.
    2 — The Top Hat (35% in)
  • How could Lego blocks of their own accord find each other and become a new horse again?
    9 — Plato (41% in)
  • The word 'automaton' means precisely that—something that moves of its own accord.
    18 — Descartes (75% in)
  • It was obviously only an illusion that they moved of their own accord.
    18 — Descartes (75% in)
  • Whatever is repressed in this way will try of its own accord to reenter consciousness.
    30 — Freud (38% in)

There are no more uses of "accord" flagged with this meaning in Sophie's World.

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®