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Vulcan
used in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler)

20 uses
  • It is a mixing bowl of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold, and it is the work of Vulcan.
    Book 15 (20% in)
  • It is a mixing bowl by Vulcan's own hand, of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold.
    Book 4 (73% in)
  • ...had got the brine out of his hair, he anointed himself with oil, and put on the clothes which the girl had given him; Minerva then made him look taller and stronger than before, she also made the hair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls like hyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders as a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcan and Minerva enriches a piece of silver plate by gilding it—and his work is full of beauty.
    Book 6 (70% in)
  • On either side there stood gold and silver mastiffs which Vulcan, with his consummate skill, had fashioned expressly to keep watch over the palace of king Alcinous; so they were immortal and could never grow old.
    Book 7 (25% in)
  • Meanwhile the bard began to sing the loves of Mars and Venus, and how they first began their intrigue in the house of Vulcan.
    Book 8 (46% in)
  • Mars made Venus many presents, and defiled King Vulcan's marriage bed, so the sun, who saw what they were about, told Vulcan.
    Book 8 (46% in)
  • Mars made Venus many presents, and defiled King Vulcan's marriage bed, so the sun, who saw what they were about, told Vulcan.
    Book 8 (47% in)
  • Vulcan was very angry when he heard such dreadful news, so he went to his smithy brooding mischief, got his great anvil into its place, and began to forge some chains which none could either unloose or break, so that they might stay there in that place.
    Book 8 (47% in)
  • Now Venus was just come in from a visit to her father Jove, and was about sitting down when Mars came inside the house, and said as he took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Vulcan: he is not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whose speech is barbarous."
    Book 8 (50% in)
  • She was nothing loth, so they went to the couch to take their rest, whereon they were caught in the toils which cunning Vulcan had spread for them, and could neither get up nor stir hand or foot, but found too late that they were in a trap.
    Book 8 (51% in)
  • Then Vulcan came up to them, for he had turned back before reaching Lemnos, when his scout the sun told him what was going on.
    Book 8 (51% in)
  • On this the gods gathered to the house of Vulcan.
    Book 8 (55% in)
  • Then the givers of all good things stood in the doorway, and the blessed gods roared with inextinguishable laughter, as they saw how cunning Vulcan had been, whereon one would turn towards his neighbour saying: "Ill deeds do not prosper, and the weak confound the strong.
    Book 8 (56% in)
  • See how limping Vulcan, lame as he is, has caught Mars who is the fleetest god in heaven; and now Mars will be cast in heavy damages.
    Book 8 (56% in)
  • The immortal gods burst out laughing as they heard him, but Neptune took it all seriously, and kept on imploring Vulcan to set Mars free again.
    Book 8 (58% in)
  • "Do not," replied Vulcan, "ask me to do this; a bad man's bond is bad security; what remedy could I enforce against you if Mars should go away and leave his debts behind him along with his chains?"
    Book 8 (59% in)
  • "Vulcan," said Neptune, "if Mars goes away without paying his damages, I will pay you myself."
    Book 8 (60% in)
  • So Vulcan answered, "In this case I cannot and must not refuse you."
    Book 8 (60% in)
  • The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointed Ulysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minerva made him look taller and stronger than before; she also made the hair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls like hyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders just as a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcan or Minerva—and his work is full of beauty—enriches a piece of silver plate by gilding it.
    Book 23 (44% in)
  • Your mother brought us a golden vase to hold them—gift of Bacchus, and work of Vulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those of Patroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also those of Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of your comrades now that Patroclus was no more.
    Book 24 (14% in)

There are no more uses of "Vulcan" in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler).

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