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mortal
used in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler)

26 uses
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1  —9 uses as in:
mortal body
Definition
human (especially merely human); or subject to death
  • "O queen," he said, "I implore your aid—but tell me, are you a goddess or are you a mortal woman?"
    Book 6 (44% in)
mortal = human
  • Book III TELEMACHUS VISITS NESTOR AT PYLOS. but as the sun was rising from the fair sea (endnote 24) into the firmament of heaven to shed light on mortals and immortals, they reached Pylos the city of Neleus.
    Book 3 (1% in)
  • And now, as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus—harbinger of light alike to mortals and immortals—the gods met in council and with them, Jove the lord of thunder, who is their king.
    Book 5 (1% in)
  • Calypso set meat and drink before him of the food that mortals eat; but her maids brought ambrosia and nectar for herself, and they laid their hands on the good things that were before them.
    Book 5 (38% in)
  • It has two entrances, one facing North by which mortals can go down into the cave, while the other comes from the South and is more mysterious; mortals cannot possibly get in by it, it is the way taken by the gods.
    Book 13 (25% in)
  • It has two entrances, one facing North by which mortals can go down into the cave, while the other comes from the South and is more mysterious; mortals cannot possibly get in by it, it is the way taken by the gods.
    Book 13 (25% in)
  • "Father Jove," said he, "I shall no longer be held in any sort of respect among you gods, if mortals like the Phaeacians, who are my own flesh and blood, show such small regard for me.
    Book 13 (29% in)
  • As regards mortals, however, if any of them is indulging in insolence and treating you disrespectfully, it will always rest with yourself to deal with him as you may think proper, so do just as you please.
    Book 13 (33% in)
  • Days and nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but on the eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheep with many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you.
    Book 24 (12% in)

There are no more uses of "mortal" flagged with this meaning in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®
?  —17 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • For Scylla is not mortal; moreover she is savage, extreme, rude, cruel and invincible.
    Book 12 (26% in)
  • Thinking upon him he spake out among the Immortals: 'Lo you now, how vainly mortal men do blame the gods!
    Prefaces (35% in)
  • "Sir," said Telemachus, "as regards your question, so long as my father was here it was well with us and with the house, but the gods in their displeasure have willed it otherwise, and have hidden him away more closely than mortal man was ever yet hidden.
    Book 1 (53% in)
  • But we suffered much more than this; what mortal tongue indeed could tell the whole story?
    Book 3 (22% in)
  • Menelaus overheard him and said, "No one, my sons, can hold his own with Jove, for his house and everything about him is immortal; but among mortal men—well, there may be another who has as much wealth as I have, or there may not; but at all events I have travelled much and have undergone much hardship, for it was nearly eight years before I could get home with my fleet.
    Book 4 (9% in)
  • For a god is not easily caught—not by a mortal man.'
    Book 4 (46% in)
  • You are always jealous and hate seeing a goddess take a fancy to a mortal man, and live with him in open matrimony.
    Book 5 (24% in)
  • ...go with you, but if you could only know how much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your own country, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, and let me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see this wife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day; yet I flatter myself that I am no whit less tall or well-looking than she is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman should compare in beauty with an immortal.
    Book 5 (41% in)
  • She had formerly been a mere mortal, but had been since raised to the rank of a marine goddess.
    Book 5 (66% in)
  • If you are a goddess and dwell in heaven, I can only conjecture that you are Jove's daughter Diana, for your face and figure resemble none but hers; if on the other hand you are a mortal and live on earth, thrice happy are your father and mother—thrice happy, too, are your brothers and sisters; how proud and delighted they must feel when they see so fair a scion as yourself going out to a dance; most happy, however, of all will he be whose wedding gifts have been the richest, and who...
    Book 6 (45% in)
  • The root was black, while the flower was as white as milk; the gods call it Moly, and mortal men cannot uproot it, but the gods can do whatever they like.
    Book 10 (55% in)
  • As a fisherman, seated, spear in hand, upon some jutting rock (endnote 104) throws bait into the water to deceive the poor little fishes, and spears them with the ox's horn with which his spear is shod, throwing them gasping on to the land as he catches them one by one—even so did Scylla land these panting creatures on her rock and munch them up at the mouth of her den, while they screamed and stretched out their hands to me in their mortal agony.
    Book 12 (56% in)
  • But Telemachus could not yet believe that it was his father, and said: "You are not my father, but some god is flattering me with vain hopes that I may grieve the more hereafter; no mortal man could of himself contrive to do as you have been doing, and make yourself old and young at a moment's notice, unless a god were with him.
    Book 16 (41% in)
  • "For shame," replied Minerva, "why, any one else would trust a worse ally than myself, even though that ally were only a mortal and less wise than I am.
    Book 20 (13% in)
  • Even so I wish that the gods who live in heaven would hide me from mortal sight, or that fair Diana might strike me, for I would fain go even beneath the sad earth if I might do so still looking towards Ulysses only, and without having to yield myself to a worse man than he was.
    Book 20 (21% in)
  • "Look to it yourself, father," answered Telemachus, "for they say you are the wisest counsellor in the world, and that there is no other mortal man who can compare with you.
    Book 23 (36% in)
  • "Son of Atreus," it said, "we used to say that Jove had loved you better from first to last than any other hero, for you were captain over many and brave men, when we were all fighting together before Troy; yet the hand of death, which no mortal can escape, was laid upon you all too early.
    Book 24 (6% in)

There are no more uses of "mortal" in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®