toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

immortal
used in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler)

47 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
Definition
living or existing forever

or:

someone famous throughout history

or:

someone who will never die — such as a mythological god
  • They say he has reigned for three generations so that it is like talking to an immortal.
    Book 3 (49% in)
immortal = someone who lives forever
  • Thinking upon him he spake out among the Immortals: 'Lo you now, how vainly mortal men do blame the gods!
    Prefaces (35% in)
  • How can I forget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, nor more liberal in his offerings to the immortal gods that live in heaven?
    Book 1 (16% in)
  • He bound his sandals on to his comely feet, girded his sword about his shoulder, and left his room looking like an immortal god.
    Book 2 (2% in)
  • Then they made all fast throughout the ship, filled the mixing bowls to the brim, and made drink offerings to the immortal gods that are from everlasting, but more particularly to the grey-eyed daughter of Jove.
    Book 2 (99% in)
  • Book III TELEMACHUS VISITS NESTOR AT PYLOS. but as the sun was rising from the fair sea (endnote 24) into the firmament of heaven to shed light on mortals and immortals, they reached Pylos the city of Neleus.
    Book 3 (1% in)
  • As he spoke the sun set and it came on dark, whereon Minerva said, "Sir, all that you have said is well; now, however, order the tongues of the victims to be cut, and mix wine that we may make drink-offerings to Neptune, and the other immortals, and then go to bed, for it is bed time.
    Book 3 (67% in)
  • "Heaven and the immortal gods," he exclaimed, "forbid that you should leave my house to go on board of a ship.
    Book 3 (69% in)
  • Menelaus overheard him and said, "No one, my sons, can hold his own with Jove, for his house and everything about him is immortal; but among mortal men—well, there may be another who has as much wealth as I have, or there may not; but at all events I have travelled much and have undergone much hardship, for it was nearly eight years before I could get home with my fleet.
    Book 4 (9% in)
  • He bound his sandals on to his comely feet, girded his sword about his shoulders, and left his room looking like an immortal god.
    Book 4 (36% in)
  • Tell me, therefore, for the gods know everything, which of the immortals it is that is hindering me in this way, and tell me also how I may sail the sea so as to reach my home.'
    Book 4 (44% in)
  • There is an old immortal who lives under the sea hereabouts and whose name is Proteus.
    Book 4 (44% in)
  • I am losing all heart; tell me, then, for you gods know everything, which of the immortals it is that is hindering me, and tell me also how I may sail the sea so as to reach my home?'
    Book 4 (55% in)
  • "Then,' he said, 'if you would finish your voyage and get home quickly, you must offer sacrifices to Jove and to the rest of the gods before embarking; for it is decreed that you shall not get back to your friends, and to your own house, till you have returned to the heaven-fed stream of Egypt, and offered holy hecatombs to the immortal gods that reign in heaven.
    Book 4 (56% in)
  • I will also give you a beautiful chalice that so long as you live you may think of me whenever you make a drink-offering to the immortal gods.
    Book 4 (70% in)
  • And now, as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus—harbinger of light alike to mortals and immortals—the gods met in council and with them, Jove the lord of thunder, who is their king.
    Book 5 (1% in)
  • I got fond of him and cherished him, and had set my heart on making him immortal, so that he should never grow old all his days; still I cannot cross Jove, nor bring his counsels to nothing; therefore, if he insists upon it, let the man go beyond the seas again; but I cannot send him anywhere myself for I have neither ships nor men who can take him.
    Book 5 (27% in)
  • Good luck go with you, but if you could only know how much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your own country, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, and let me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see this wife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day; yet I flatter myself that I am no whit less tall or well-looking than she is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman should compare in beauty with an...
    Book 5 (40% in)
  • ...go with you, but if you could only know how much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your own country, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, and let me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see this wife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day; yet I flatter myself that I am no whit less tall or well-looking than she is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman should compare in beauty with an immortal.
    Book 5 (42% in)
  • She is only a woman, whereas you are an immortal.
    Book 5 (42% in)
  • Close to her seat stands that of my father, on which he sits and topes like an immortal god.
    Book 6 (94% in)
  • On either side there stood gold and silver mastiffs which Vulcan, with his consummate skill, had fashioned expressly to keep watch over the palace of king Alcinous; so they were immortal and could never grow old.
    Book 7 (26% in)
  • It is possible, however, that the stranger is one of the immortals who has come down from heaven to visit us; but in this case the gods are departing from their usual practice, for hitherto they have made themselves perfectly clear to us when we have been offering them hecatombs.
    Book 7 (57% in)
  • I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in body nor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the most afflicted.
    Book 7 (60% in)
  • She took me in and treated me with the utmost kindness; indeed she wanted to make me immortal that I might never grow old, but she could not persuade me to let her do so.
    Book 7 (74% in)
  • She went up to the citizens, man by man, and said, "Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, come to the assembly all of you and listen to the stranger who has just come off a long voyage to the house of King Alcinous; he looks like an immortal god."
    Book 8 (2% in)
  • The immortal gods burst out laughing as they heard him, but Neptune took it all seriously, and kept on imploring Vulcan to set Mars free again.
    Book 8 (58% in)
  • "Let him go," he cried, "and I will undertake, as you require, that he shall pay you all the damages that are held reasonable among the immortal gods."
    Book 8 (59% in)
  • Here the Graces bathed her, and anointed her with oil of ambrosia such as the immortal gods make use of, and they clothed her in raiment of the most enchanting beauty.
    Book 8 (61% in)
  • Thence we went on to the Aeolian island where lives Aeolus son of Hippotas, dear to the immortal gods.
    Book 10 (0% in)
  • After him I saw mighty Hercules, but it was his phantom only, for he is feasting ever with the immortal gods, and has lovely Hebe to wife, who is daughter of Jove and Juno.
    Book 11 (94% in)
  • " 'You dare devil,' replied the goddess, 'you are always wanting to fight somebody or something; you will not let yourself be beaten even by the immortals.
    Book 12 (25% in)
  • Why should not we drive in the best of these cows and offer them in sacrifice to the immortal gods?
    Book 12 (74% in)
  • As I drew near I began to smell hot roast meat, so I groaned out a prayer to the immortal gods.
    Book 12 (80% in)
  • "Meanwhile Lampetie went straight off to the sun and told him we had been killing his cows, whereon he flew into a great rage, and said to the immortals, 'Father Jove, and all you other gods who live in everlasting bliss, I must have vengeance on the crew of Ulysses' ship: they have had the insolence to kill my cows, which were the one thing I loved to look upon, whether I was going up heaven or down again.
    Book 12 (82% in)
  • As he spoke he cut off the first piece and offered it as a burnt sacrifice to the immortal gods; then he made them a drink-offering, put the cup in the hands of Ulysses, and sat down to his own portion.
    Book 14 (84% in)
  • Aurora, throned in gold, carried off Cleitus for his beauty's sake, that he might dwell among the immortals, but Apollo made Polypheides the greatest seer in the whole world now that Amphiaraus was dead.
    Book 15 (44% in)
  • But Ulysses stuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of the Phaeacians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated him as though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishing to escort him home safe and sound.
    Book 19 (48% in)
  • He came from the bath looking like one of the immortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left.
    Book 23 (45% in)
  • ...that all his men perished together, himself alone being left alive; how at last he reached the Ogygian island and the nymph Calypso, who kept him there in a cave, and fed him, and wanted him to marry her, in which case she intended making him immortal so that he should never grow old, but she could not persuade him to let her do so; and how after much suffering he had found his way to the Phaeacians, who had treated him as though he had been a god, and sent him back in a ship to his...
    Book 23 (90% in)
  • Your mother, when she heard, came with her immortal nymphs from out of the sea, and the sound of a great wailing went forth over the waters so that the Achaeans quaked for fear.
    Book 24 (9% in)
  • They would have fled panic-stricken to their ships had not wise old Nestor whose counsel was ever truest checked them saying, 'Hold, Argives, fly not sons of the Achaeans, this is his mother coming from the sea with her immortal nymphs to view the body of her son.'
    Book 24 (11% in)
  • The daughters of the old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothed you in immortal raiment.
    Book 24 (11% in)
  • Days and nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but on the eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheep with many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you.
    Book 24 (12% in)
  • The fame, therefore, of her virtue shall never die, and the immortals shall compose a song that shall be welcome to all mankind in honour of the constancy of Penelope.
    Book 24 (36% in)
  • When he came back his son was surprised to see him looking so like an immortal, and said to him, "My dear father, some one of the gods has been making you much taller and better-looking."
    Book 24 (68% in)
  • I myself saw an immortal god take the form of Mentor and stand beside him.
    Book 24 (81% in)

There are no more uses of "immortal" in The Odyssey by Homer - (translated by: Butler).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®