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insolent
used in The Odyssey by Homer (translated by: Butcher & Lang)

14 uses
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Definition
rudely disrespectful
  • Their ungracious speech it is that I would avoid, lest some man afterward rebuke me, and there are but too many insolent folk among the people.
    Book 6 (83% in)
  • In such wise, flown with insolence, do they seem to me to revel wantonly through the house: and well might any man be wroth to see so many deeds of shame, whatso wise man came among them.'
    Book 1 (53% in)
  • But the wooers meantime were before the palace of Odysseus, taking their pleasure in casting of weights and spears, on a levelled place, as heretofore, in their insolence.
    Book 4 (75% in)
  • And straight he spake with angry heart amid the Immortals: ' "Father Zeus, and all ye other blessed gods that live for ever, take vengeance I pray you on the company of Odysseus, son of Laertes, that have insolently slain my cattle, wherein I was wont to be glad as I went toward the starry heaven, and when I again turned earthward from the firmament.
    Book 12 (84% in)
  • But lo you, these men know somewhat,—for they have heard an utterance of a god —, even the tidings of our lord's evil end, seeing that they are not minded justly to woo, nor to go back to their own, but at ease they devour our wealth with insolence, and now there is no sparing.
    Book 14 (18% in)
  • But thither into the company of the wooers would I not suffer him to go, for they are exceeding full of infatuate insolence, lest they mock at him, and that would be a sore grief to me.
    Book 16 (18% in)
  • For thou shalt be long time on thy road to little purpose, making trial of each man, while thou visitest the farm lands; but at ease in thy halls the wooers devour thy goods with insolence, and now there is no sparing.
    Book 16 (65% in)
  • Then the wise Penelope had a new thought, namely, to show herself to the wooers, so despiteful in their insolence; for she had heard of the death of her son that was to be in the halls, seeing that Medon the henchman had told her of it; who heard their counsels.
    Book 16 (85% in)
  • Now when that fair lady had come unto the wooers, she stood by the pillar of the well-builded roof, holding up her glistening tire before her face, and rebuked Antinous and spake and hailed him: 'Antinous, full of all insolence, deviser of mischief! and yet they say that in the land of Ithaca thou art chiefest among thy peers in counsel and in speech.
    Book 16 (87% in)
  • But the wooers meantime were before the palace of Odysseus, taking their pleasure in casting of weights and of spears on a levelled place, as heretofore, in their insolence.
    Book 17 (27% in)
  • Then would he scatter all thy bravery, which now thou flauntest insolently, wandering ever about the city, while evil shepherds destroy the flock.'
    Book 17 (40% in)
  • Then Odysseus of many counsels answered him saying: 'Oh, that the gods, Eumaeus, may avenge the scorn wherewith these men deal insolently, and devise infatuate deeds in another's house, and have no place for shame!'
    Book 20 (43% in)
  • With these I will go forth, for I see evil coming on you, which not one man of the wooers may avoid or shun, of all you who in the house of divine Odysseus deal insolently with men and devise infatuate deeds.'
    Book 20 (93% in)
  • But this is no true tale, as thou declarest it, nay but it is one of the deathless gods that hath slain the proud wooers, in wrath at their bitter insolence and evil deeds.
    Book 23 (18% in)

There are no more uses of "insolent" in The Odyssey by Homer (translated by: Butcher & Lang).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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