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heed
used in The Odyssey by Homer (translated by: Butcher & Lang)

35 uses
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Definition
pay close attention to; or to do what is suggested — especially with regard to a warning or other advice
  • So spake he, nor heedless was the messenger, the slayer of Argos.
    Book 5 (10% in)
  • Come now, mark and take heed unto my words.
    Book 1 (62% in)
  • But I will now go down to the swift ship and to my men, who methinks chafe much at tarrying for me; and do thou thyself take heed and give ear unto my words.'
    Book 1 (70% in)
  • For ere that, I trow, we sons of the Achaeans will not cease from our rough wooing, since, come what may, we fear not any man, no, not Telemachus, full of words though he be, nor soothsaying do we heed, whereof thou, old man, pratest idly, and art hated yet the more.
    Book 2 (48% in)
  • Wherefore now take no heed of the counsel or the purpose of the senseless wooers, for they are in no way wise or just: neither know they aught of death and of black fate, which already is close upon them, that they are all to perish in one day.
    Book 2 (66% in)
  • Even so he spake, and they gave good heed and hearkened; and quickly they yoked the swift horses beneath the chariot.
    Book 3 (96% in)
  • In her shape the grey-eyed Athene spake to the princess, saying: 'Nausicaa, how hath thy mother so heedless a maiden to her daughter?
    Book 6 (9% in)
  • But, stranger, heed well what I say, that as soon as may be thou mayest gain at my father's hands an escort and a safe return.
    Book 6 (87% in)
  • And well they trotted and well they paced, and she took heed to drive in such wise that the maidens and Odysseus might follow on foot, and cunningly she plied the lash.
    Book 6 (96% in)
  • For the Cyclopes pay no heed to Zeus, lord of the aegis, nor to the blessed gods, for verily we are better men than they.
    Book 9 (48% in)
  • But he heeded not the sacrifice, but was devising how my decked ships and my dear company might perish utterly.
    Book 9 (98% in)
  • Then he sent forth the blast of the West Wind to blow for me, to bear our ships and ourselves upon our way; but this he was never to bring to pass, for we were undone through our own heedlessness.
    Book 10 (6% in)
  • And straightway she came forth and opened the shining doors and bade them in, and all went with her in their heedlessness.
    Book 10 (42% in)
  • And straightway she came forth, and opened the shining doors and bade them in, and they all went with her in their heedlessness.
    Book 10 (47% in)
  • 'So spake he and I put up my silver-studded sword into the sheath, and when he had drunk the dark blood, even then did the noble seer speak unto me, saying: "Thou art asking of thy sweet returning, great Odysseus, but that will the god make hard for thee; for methinks thou shalt not pass unheeded by the Shaker of the Earth, who hath laid up wrath in his heart against thee, for rage at the blinding of his dear son.
    Book 11 (16% in)
  • But take heed and swiftly drawing nigh to Scylla's rock drive the ship past, since of a truth it is far better to mourn six of thy company in the ship, than all in the selfsame hour."
    Book 12 (24% in)
  • So spake he, and the warrior Menelaus pondered thereupon, how he should take heed to answer, and interpret it aright.
    Book 15 (31% in)
  • So spake he, and they gave good heed and hearkened.
    Book 15 (40% in)
  • Then spake to him the swineherd, a master of men: Stranger, since thou askest and questionest me hereof, give heed now in silence and make merry, and abide here drinking wine.
    Book 15 (71% in)
  • Then he spake to Piraeus, his trusty companion: 'Piraeus, son of Clytius, thou that at other seasons hearkenest to me above all my company who went with me to Pylos, even now, I pray, lead this stranger home with thee, and give heed to treat him lovingly and with worship in thy house till I come.'
    Book 15 (97% in)
  • Then didst thou make answer, swineherd Eumaeus: 'I mark, I heed, all this thou speakest to one with understanding.
    Book 16 (28% in)
  • But I deem not that this device of thine will be gainful to us twain, so I bid thee to give heed.
    Book 16 (65% in)
  • I sent him forward with my godlike company, and commanded Piraeus to lead him home, and to take heed to treat him lovingly and with worship till I should come.'
    Book 17 (9% in)
  • Then Odysseus of many counsels answered him saying: 'I mark, I heed: all this thou speakest to one with understanding.
    Book 17 (31% in)
  • Then the steadfast goodly Odysseus answered him, saying: 'I mark, I heed, all this thou speakest to one with understanding.
    Book 17 (46% in)
  • So the wooers spake, but he heeded not their words.
    Book 17 (80% in)
  • Yet first look to thyself and take heed that no evil comes nigh thee, for many of the Achaeans have ill will against us, whom may Zeus confound before their mischief falls on us!'
    Book 17 (98% in)
  • Take heed lest a better man than Irus rise up presently against thee, to lay his mighty hands about thy head and bedabble thee with blood, and send thee hence from the house.'
    Book 18 (77% in)
  • Wherefore I take no heed of strangers, nor suppliants, nor at all of heralds, the craftsmen of the people.
    Book 19 (23% in)
  • So spake Antinous, but Telemachus took no heed of his words.
    Book 20 (69% in)
  • }So spake the wooers, but he heeded not their words, in silence he looked towards his father, expecting evermore the hour when he should stretch forth his hands upon the shameless wooers.
    Book 20 (97% in)
  • Take heed, lest I that am younger than thou pursue thee to the field, and pelt thee with stones, for in might I am the better.
    Book 21 (85% in)
  • }So he spake, and they gave good heed and hearkened.
    Book 22 (37% in)
  • Of the rest will we take no heed, so soon as that man shall have fallen.'
    Book 22 (52% in)
  • He was but of little understanding, for he deigned not to tell me all nor to heed my saying, when I questioned him concerning my friend, whether indeed he is yet alive or is even now dead and within the house of Hades.
    Book 24 (47% in)

There are no more uses of "heed" in The Odyssey by Homer (translated by: Butcher & Lang).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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