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sufficient
used in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

6 uses
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Definition
adequate (enough — often without being more than is needed)
  • It was almost a sufficient motive, not only to make me take off what would be called by pig-drovers the mange, but the skin itself.
    Chapter 5 (35% in)
  • The last and most successful one was that of tarring his fence all around; after which, if a slave was caught with any tar upon his person, it was deemed sufficient proof that he had either been into the garden, or had tried to get in.
    Chapter 3 (13% in)
  • He has not been sufficiently rubbed and curried, or he has not been properly fed; his food was too wet or too dry; he got it too soon or too late; he was too hot or too cold; he had too much hay, and not enough of grain; or he had too much grain, and not enough of hay; instead of old Barney's attending to the horse, he had very improperly left it to his son."
    Chapter 3 (36% in)
  • I have an abundance of such illustrations of the same principle, drawn from my own observation, but think the cases I have cited sufficient.
    Chapter 10 (45% in)
  • He, like Mr. Covey, gave us enough to eat; but, unlike Mr. Covey, he also gave us sufficient time to take our meals.
    Chapter 10 (53% in)
  • If I had been killed in the presence of a thousand colored people, their testimony combined would have been insufficient to have arrested one of the murderers.
    Chapter 10 (95% in)

There are no more uses of "sufficient" in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

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