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principle
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope)

4 uses
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Definition
a basic rule or belief
The exact meaning of principle can depend upon its context. For example:
  • "our guiding principles" — basic moral beliefs that guide decisions and behavior
  • "electromagnetic principles" — rules describing how the world works
  • "She lacks principles." — lacks moral guidelines
  • "We agree in principle." — about important basic beliefs
  • He was one of the dramatis personae in two dramas as unlike in principles as in style.
    Introduction (5% in)
  • The same principles which have swept away traditional abuses, and which are making rapid havoc among the revenues of sinecurists, and stripping the thin, tawdry veil from attractive superstitions, are working as actively in literature as in society.
    Introduction (1% in)
  • But unless there be some grand pervading principle—some invisible, yet most distinctly stamped archetypus of the great whole, a poem like the Iliad can never come to the birth.
    Introduction (82% in)
  • Lastly, there are others, who, pretending to a fairer proceeding, distinguish between the personal merit of Homer, and that of his work; but when they come to assign the causes of the great reputation of the Iliad, they found it upon the ignorance of his times, and the prejudice of those that followed: and in pursuance of this principle, they make those accidents (such as the contention of the cities, &c.
    Preface (60% in)

There are no more uses of "principle" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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