toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

Achilles
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope)

409 uses
(click/touch triangles for details)
1  —23 uses
The Greek God
Definition
mythical Greek hero of the Iliad; central character and foremost Greek warrior at the siege of Troy
  • Illustration: HECTOR'S BODY AT THE CAR OF ACHILLES.
    Book 24 (7% in)
  • THE CONTENTION OF ACHILLES AND AGAMEMNON.
    Book 1 (0% in)
  • Illustration: MINERVA REPRESSING THE FURY OF ACHILLES.
    Book 1 (37% in)
  • MINERVA REPRESSING THE FURY OF ACHILLES.
    Book 1 (37% in)
  • Illustration: THE DEPARTURE OF BRISEIS FROM THE TENT OF ACHILLES.
    Book 1 (59% in)
  • THE DEPARTURE OF BRISEIS FROM THE TENT OF ACHILLES.
    Book 1 (59% in)
  • Illustration: THETIS ENTREATING JUPITER TO HONOUR ACHILLES.
    Book 1 (85% in)
  • THETIS ENTREATING JUPITER TO HONOUR ACHILLES.
    Book 1 (85% in)
  • Illustration: THE SHIELD OF ACHILLES.
    Book 8 (**% in)
  • THE SHIELD OF ACHILLES.
    Book 8 (**% in)
  • THE EMBASSY TO ACHILLES.
    Book 9 (0% in)
  • Illustration: THE EMBASSY TO ACHILLES.
    Book 9 (29% in)
  • THE EMBASSY TO ACHILLES.
    Book 9 (29% in)
  • Illustration: ACHILLES.
    Book 9 (**% in)
  • ACHILLES.
    Book 9 (**% in)
  • THE GRIEF OF ACHILLES, AND NEW ARMOUR MADE HIM BY VULCAN.
    Book 18 (0% in)
  • THE RECONCILIATION OF ACHILLES AND AGAMEMNON.
    Book 19 (0% in)
  • Illustration: THETIS BRINGING THE ARMOUR TO ACHILLES.
    Book 19 (13% in)
  • THETIS BRINGING THE ARMOUR TO ACHILLES.
    Book 19 (13% in)
  • THE BATTLE OF THE GODS, AND THE ACTS OF ACHILLES.
    Book 20 (0% in)
  • Illustration: ACHILLES CONTENDING WITH THE RIVERS.
    Book 21 (53% in)
  • ACHILLES CONTENDING WITH THE RIVERS.
    Book 21 (53% in)
  • HECTOR'S BODY AT THE CAR OF ACHILLES.
    Book 24 (7% in)

There are no more uses of "Achilles" flagged with this meaning in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®Encyclopedia Mythica ArticleWikipedia Article
?  —386 uses
exact meaning not specified
  • The rescue of Achilles by the fiery arms of Vulcan scarcely admits of the same ready explanation from physical causes.
    Footnotes (88% in)
  • If, however, the Homeric ballads, as they are sometimes called, which related the wrath of Achilles, with all its direful consequences, were so far superior to the rest of the poetic cycle, as to admit no rivalry,—it is still surprising, that throughout the whole poem the callida junctura should never betray the workmanship of an Athenian hand, and that the national spirit of a race, who have at a later period not inaptly been compared to our self admiring neighbours, the French,...
    Introduction (56% in)
  • Moreover, we find no contradictions warranting this belief, and the so-called sixteen poets concur in getting rid of the following leading men in the first battle after the secession of Achilles: Elphenor, chief of the Euboeans; Tlepolemus, of the Rhodians; Pandarus, of the Lycians; Odius, of the Halizonians; Pirous and Acamas, of the Thracians.
    Introduction (59% in)
  • While employed on the wild legend of Odysseus, he met with a ballad, recording the quarrel of Achilles and Agamemnon.
    Introduction (70% in)
  • In reading an heroic poem we must transform ourselves into heroes of the time being, we in imagination must fight over the same battles, woo the same loves, burn with the same sense of injury, as an Achilles or a Hector.
    Introduction (86% in)
  • That of the Iliad is the "anger of Achilles," the most short and single subject that ever was chosen by any poet.
    Preface (11% in)
  • If Achilles be absent from the army on the score of a quarrel through half the poem, Rinaldo must absent himself just as long on the like account.
    Preface (14% in)
  • That of Achilles is furious and intractable; that of Diomede forward, yet listening to advice, and subject to command; that of Ajax is heavy and self-confiding; of Hector, active and vigilant: the courage of Agamemnon is inspirited by love of empire and ambition; that of Menelaus mixed with softness and tenderness for his people: we find in Idomeneus a plain direct soldier; in Sarpedon a gallant and generous one.
    Preface (20% in)
  • Homer, boundless and resistless as Achilles, bears all before him, and shines more and more as the tumult increases; Virgil, calmly daring, like AEneas, appears undisturbed in the midst of the action; disposes all about him, and conquers with tranquillity.
    Preface (44% in)
  • This consideration may further serve to answer for the constant use of the same epithets to his gods and heroes; such as the "far-darting Phoebus," the "blue-eyed Pallas," the "swift-footed Achilles," &c.
    Preface (53% in)
  • ...and moral of the AEneis to those of the Iliad, for the same reasons which might set the Odyssey above the AEneis; as that the hero is a wiser man, and the action of the one more beneficial to his country than that of the other; or else they blame him for not doing what he never designed; as because Achilles is not as good and perfect a prince as AEneas, when the very moral of his poem required a contrary character: it is thus that Rapin judges in his comparison of Homer and Virgil.
    Preface (58% in)
  • In the war of Troy, the Greeks having sacked some of the neighbouring towns, and taken from thence two beautiful captives, Chryseis and Briseis, allotted the first to Agamemnon, and the last to Achilles.
    Book 1 (1% in)
  • Achilles calls a council, and encourages Chalcas to declare the cause of it; who attributes it to the refusal of Chryseis.
    Book 1 (2% in)
  • The king, being obliged to send back his captive, enters into a furious contest with Achilles, which Nestor pacifies; however, as he had the absolute command of the army, he seizes on Briseis in revenge.
    Book 1 (2% in)
  • Achilles in discontent withdraws himself and his forces from the rest of the Greeks; and complaining to Thetis, she supplicates Jupiter to render them sensible of the wrong done to her son, by giving victory to the Trojans.
    Book 1 (3% in)
  • Achilles' wrath, to Greece the direful spring Of woes unnumber'd, heavenly goddess, sing!
    Book 1 (4% in)
  • (41) Since great Achilles and Atrides strove, Such was the sovereign doom, and such the will of Jove!
    Book 1 (5% in)
  • (52) The assembly seated, rising o'er the rest, Achilles thus the king of men address'd: "Why leave we not the fatal Trojan shore, And measure back the seas we cross'd before?
    Book 1 (14% in)
  • He said, and sat: when Chalcas thus replied; Chalcas the wise, the Grecian priest and guide, That sacred seer, whose comprehensive view, The past, the present, and the future knew: Uprising slow, the venerable sage Thus spoke the prudence and the fears of age: "Beloved of Jove, Achilles! would'st thou know Why angry Phoebus bends his fatal bow?
    Book 1 (16% in)
  • And whose bless'd oracles thy lips declare; Long as Achilles breathes this vital air, No daring Greek, of all the numerous band, Against his priest shall lift an impious hand; Not e'en the chief by whom our hosts are led, The king of kings, shall touch that sacred head."
    Book 1 (18% in)
  • Insatiate king (Achilles thus replies), Fond of the power, but fonder of the prize!
    Book 1 (23% in)
  • Soon shall the fair the sable ship ascend, And some deputed prince the charge attend: This Creta's king, or Ajax shall fulfil, Or wise Ulysses see perform'd our will; Or, if our royal pleasure shall ordain, Achilles' self conduct her o'er the main; Let fierce Achilles, dreadful in his rage, The god propitiate, and the pest assuage."
    Book 1 (27% in)
  • Soon shall the fair the sable ship ascend, And some deputed prince the charge attend: This Creta's king, or Ajax shall fulfil, Or wise Ulysses see perform'd our will; Or, if our royal pleasure shall ordain, Achilles' self conduct her o'er the main; Let fierce Achilles, dreadful in his rage, The god propitiate, and the pest assuage."
    Book 1 (28% in)
  • But know, proud monarch, I'm thy slave no more; My fleet shall waft me to Thessalia's shore: Left by Achilles on the Trojan plain, What spoils, what conquests, shall Atrides gain?"
    Book 1 (31% in)
  • Achilles heard, with grief and rage oppress'd, His heart swell'd high, and labour'd in his breast; Distracting thoughts by turns his bosom ruled; Now fired by wrath, and now by reason cool'd: That prompts his hand to draw the deadly sword, Force through the Greeks, and pierce their haughty lord; This whispers soft his vengeance to control, And calm the rising tempest of his soul.
    Book 1 (35% in)
  • Just as in anguish of suspense he stay'd, While half unsheathed appear'd the glittering blade,(57) Minerva swift descended from above, Sent by the sister and the wife of Jove (For both the princes claim'd her equal care); Behind she stood, and by the golden hair Achilles seized; to him alone confess'd; A sable cloud conceal'd her from the rest.
    Book 1 (37% in)
  • "Forbear (the progeny of Jove replies) To calm thy fury I forsake the skies: Let great Achilles, to the gods resign'd, To reason yield the empire o'er his mind.
    Book 1 (38% in)
  • Now by this sacred sceptre hear me swear, Which never more shall leaves or blossoms bear, Which sever'd from the trunk (as I from thee) On the bare mountains left its parent tree; This sceptre, form'd by temper'd steel to prove An ensign of the delegates of Jove, From whom the power of laws and justice springs (Tremendous oath! inviolate to kings); By this I swear:—when bleeding Greece again Shall call Achilles, she shall call in vain.
    Book 1 (43% in)
  • Atrides, seize not on the beauteous slave; That prize the Greeks by common suffrage gave: Nor thou, Achilles, treat our prince with pride; Let kings be just, and sovereign power preside.
    Book 1 (49% in)
  • Leave me, O king! to calm Achilles' rage; Rule thou thyself, as more advanced in age.
    Book 1 (50% in)
  • Achilles should be lost, The pride of Greece, and bulwark of our host.
    Book 1 (50% in)
  • Here on the monarch's speech Achilles broke, And furious, thus, and interrupting spoke: "Tyrant, I well deserved thy galling chain, To live thy slave, and still to serve in vain, Should I submit to each unjust decree:— Command thy vassals, but command not me.
    Book 1 (51% in)
  • Seize on Briseis, whom the Grecians doom'd My prize of war, yet tamely see resumed; And seize secure; no more Achilles draws His conquering sword in any woman's cause.
    Book 1 (52% in)
  • Achilles with Patroclus took his way Where near his tents his hollow vessels lay.
    Book 1 (53% in)
  • "Haste to the fierce Achilles' tent (he cries), Thence bear Briseis as our royal prize: Submit he must; or if they will not part, Ourself in arms shall tear her from his heart."
    Book 1 (56% in)
  • But first, and loudest, to your prince declare (That lawless tyrant whose commands you bear), Unmoved as death Achilles shall remain, Though prostrate Greece shall bleed at every vein: The raging chief in frantic passion lost, Blind to himself, and useless to his host, Unskill'd to judge the future by the past, In blood and slaughter shall repent at last."
    Book 1 (58% in)
  • Not so his loss the fierce Achilles bore; But sad, retiring to the sounding shore, O'er the wild margin of the deep he hung, That kindred deep from whence his mother sprung:(61) There bathed in tears of anger and disdain, Thus loud lamented to the stormy main: "O parent goddess! since in early bloom Thy son must fall, by too severe a doom; Sure to so short a race of glory born, Great Jove in justice should this span adorn: Honour and fame at least the thunderer owed; And ill he pays...
    Book 1 (60% in)
  • But raging still, amidst his navy sat The stern Achilles, stedfast in his hate; Nor mix'd in combat, nor in council join'd; But wasting cares lay heavy on his mind: In his black thoughts revenge and slaughter roll, And scenes of blood rise dreadful in his soul.
    Book 1 (82% in)
  • Jupiter, in pursuance of the request of Thetis, sends a deceitful vision to Agamemnon, persuading him to lead the army to battle, in order to make the Greeks sensible of their want of Achilles.
    Book 2 (1% in)
  • Spleen to mankind his envious heart possess'd, And much he hated all, but most the best: Ulysses or Achilles still his theme; But royal scandal his delight supreme, Long had he lived the scorn of every Greek, Vex'd when he spoke, yet still they heard him speak.
    Book 2 (28% in)
  • We may be wanted on some busy day, When Hector comes: so great Achilles may: From him he forced the prize we jointly gave, From him, the fierce, the fearless, and the brave: And durst he, as he ought, resent that wrong, This mighty tyrant were no tyrant long.
    Book 2 (30% in)
  • But Jove forbids, who plunges those he hates In fierce contention and in vain debates: Now great Achilles from our aid withdraws, By me provoked; a captive maid the cause: If e'er as friends we join, the Trojan wall Must shake, and heavy will the vengeance fall!
    Book 2 (44% in)
  • Full fifty ships beneath Achilles' care, The Achaians, Myrmidons, Hellenians bear; Thessalians all, though various in their name; The same their nation, and their chief the same.
    Book 2 (79% in)
  • There mourn'd Achilles, plunged in depth of care, But soon to rise in slaughter, blood, and war.
    Book 2 (80% in)
  • Ajax in arms the first renown acquired, While stern Achilles in his wrath retired: (His was the strength that mortal might exceeds, And his the unrivall'd race of heavenly steeds:) But Thetis' son now shines in arms no more; His troops, neglected on the sandy shore.
    Book 2 (88% in)
  • There mighty Chromis led the Mysian train, And augur Ennomus, inspired in vain; For stern Achilles lopp'd his sacred head, Roll'd down Scamander with the vulgar dead.
    Book 2 (98% in)
  • Fool that he was! by fierce Achilles slain, The river swept him to the briny main: There whelm'd with waves the gaudy warrior lies The valiant victor seized the golden prize.
    Book 2 (99% in)
  • The great, the fierce Achilles fights no more.
    Book 4 (93% in)
  • Once from the walls your timorous foes engaged, While fierce in war divine Achilles raged; Now issuing fearless they possess the plain, Now win the shores, and scarce the seas remain.
    Book 5 (88% in)
  • ...for art, and labour'd o'er with gold, Before the goddess' honour'd knees be spread, And twelve young heifers to her altars led: If so the power, atoned by fervent prayer, Our wives, our infants, and our city spare, And far avert Tydides' wasteful ire, That mows whole troops, and makes all Troy retire; Not thus Achilles taught our hosts to dread, Sprung though he was from more than mortal bed; Not thus resistless ruled the stream of fight, In rage unbounded, and unmatch'd in might."
    Book 6 (20% in)
  • The fierce Achilles wrapt our walls in fire, Laid Thebe waste, and slew my warlike sire!
    Book 6 (78% in)
  • Grieved though thou art, forbear the rash design; Great Hectors arm is mightier far than thine: Even fierce Achilles learn'd its force to fear, And trembling met this dreadful son of war.
    Book 7 (26% in)
  • Achilles shuns the fight; yet some there are, Not void of soul, and not unskill'd in war: Let him, unactive on the sea-beat shore, Indulge his wrath, and aid our arms no more; Whole troops of heroes Greece has yet to boast, And sends thee one, a sample of her host, Such as I am, I come to prove thy might; No more—be sudden, and begin the fight."
    Book 7 (49% in)
  • High on the midmost bark the king appear'd: There, from Ulysses' deck, his voice was heard: To Ajax and Achilles reach'd the sound, Whose distant ships the guarded navy bound.
    Book 8 (40% in)
  • Nor shall great Hector cease the rage of fight, The navy flaming, and thy Greeks in flight, Even till the day when certain fates ordain That stern Achilles (his Patroclus slain) Shall rise in vengeance, and lay waste the plain.
    Book 8 (84% in)
  • Agamemnon pursues this advice, and Nestor further prevails upon him to send ambassadors to Achilles, in order to move him to a reconciliation.
    Book 9 (1% in)
  • They make, each of them, very moving and pressing speeches, but are rejected with roughness by Achilles, who notwithstanding retains Phoenix in his tent.
    Book 9 (2% in)
  • Achilles starting, as the chiefs he spied, Leap'd from his seat, and laid the harp aside.
    Book 9 (33% in)
  • Achilles at the genial feast presides, The parts transfixes, and with skill divides.
    Book 9 (35% in)
  • Health to Achilles! happy are thy guests!
    Book 9 (37% in)
  • Return, Achilles: oh return, though late, To save thy Greeks, and stop the course of Fate; If in that heart or grief or courage lies, Rise to redeem; ah, yet to conquer, rise!
    Book 9 (40% in)
  • There was a time ('twas when for Greece I fought) When Hector's prowess no such wonders wrought; He kept the verge of Troy, nor dared to wait Achilles' fury at the Scaean gate; He tried it once, and scarce was saved by fate.
    Book 9 (57% in)
  • The third day hence shall Pthia greet our sails,(208) If mighty Neptune send propitious gales; Pthia to her Achilles shall restore The wealth he left for this detested shore: Thither the spoils of this long war shall pass, The ruddy gold, the steel, and shining brass: My beauteous captives thither I'll convey, And all that rests of my unravish'd prey.
    Book 9 (58% in)
  • Atrides' daughter never shall be led (An ill-match'd consort) to Achilles' bed; Like golden Venus though she charm'd the heart, And vied with Pallas in the works of art; Some greater Greek let those high nuptials grace, I hate alliance with a tyrant's race.
    Book 9 (62% in)
  • One stratagem has fail'd, and others will: Ye find, Achilles is unconquer'd still.
    Book 9 (66% in)
  • Divine Achilles! wilt thou then retire, And leave our hosts in blood, our fleets on fire?
    Book 9 (68% in)
  • Thus he: the stern Achilles thus replied: "My second father, and my reverend guide: Thy friend, believe me, no such gifts demands, And asks no honours from a mortal's hands; Jove honours me, and favours my designs; His pleasure guides me, and his will confines; And here I stay (if such his high behest) While life's warm spirit beats within my breast.
    Book 9 (86% in)
  • Then hear, Achilles! be of better mind; Revere thy roof, and to thy guests be kind; And know the men of all the Grecian host, Who honour worth, and prize thy valour most.
    Book 9 (90% in)
  • Meantime Achilles' slaves prepared a bed, With fleeces, carpets, and soft linen spread: There, till the sacred morn restored the day, In slumber sweet the reverend Phoenix lay.
    Book 9 (93% in)
  • But in his inner tent, an ampler space, Achilles slept; and in his warm embrace Fair Diomede of the Lesbian race.
    Book 9 (93% in)
  • Last, for Patroclus was the couch prepared, Whose nightly joys the beauteous Iphis shared; Achilles to his friend consign'd her charms When Scyros fell before his conquering arms.
    Book 9 (94% in)
  • Achilles' high resolves declare to all: "Returns the chief, or must our navy fall?"
    Book 9 (95% in)
  • Why should we gifts to proud Achilles send, Or strive with prayers his haughty soul to bend?
    Book 9 (97% in)
  • Upon the refusal of Achilles to return to the army, the distress of Agamemnon is described in the most lively manner.
    Book 10 (0% in)
  • Audacious Hector, if the gods ordain That great Achilles rise and rage again, What toils attend thee, and what woes remain!
    Book 10 (20% in)
  • Then thus pale Dolon, with a fearful look: (Still, as he spoke, his limbs with horror shook:) "Hither I came, by Hector's words deceived; Much did he promise, rashly I believed: No less a bribe than great Achilles' car, And those swift steeds that sweep the ranks of war, Urged me, unwilling, this attempt to make; To learn what counsels, what resolves you take: If now subdued, you fix your hopes on flight, And, tired with toils, neglect the watch of night."
    Book 10 (69% in)
  • Bold was thy aim, and glorious was the prize, (Ulysses, with a scornful smile, replies,) Far other rulers those proud steeds demand, And scorn the guidance of a vulgar hand; Even great Achilles scarce their rage can tame, Achilles sprung from an immortal dame.
    Book 10 (71% in)
  • Bold was thy aim, and glorious was the prize, (Ulysses, with a scornful smile, replies,) Far other rulers those proud steeds demand, And scorn the guidance of a vulgar hand; Even great Achilles scarce their rage can tame, Achilles sprung from an immortal dame.
    Book 10 (71% in)
  • Achilles (who overlooked the action from his ship) sent Patroclus to inquire which of the Greeks was wounded in that manner; Nestor entertains him in his tent with an account of the accidents of the day, and a long recital of some former wars which he remembered, tending to put Patroclus upon persuading Achilles to fight for his countrymen, or at least to permit him to do it, clad in Achilles' armour.
    Book 11 (2% in)
  • Achilles (who overlooked the action from his ship) sent Patroclus to inquire which of the Greeks was wounded in that manner; Nestor entertains him in his tent with an account of the accidents of the day, and a long recital of some former wars which he remembered, tending to put Patroclus upon persuading Achilles to fight for his countrymen, or at least to permit him to do it, clad in Achilles' armour.
    Book 11 (3% in)
  • Achilles (who overlooked the action from his ship) sent Patroclus to inquire which of the Greeks was wounded in that manner; Nestor entertains him in his tent with an account of the accidents of the day, and a long recital of some former wars which he remembered, tending to put Patroclus upon persuading Achilles to fight for his countrymen, or at least to permit him to do it, clad in Achilles' armour.
    Book 11 (3% in)
  • Even Ajax and Achilles heard the sound, Whose ships, remote, the guarded navy bound, Thence the black fury through the Grecian throng With horror sounds the loud Orthian song: The navy shakes, and at the dire alarms Each bosom boils, each warrior starts to arms.
    Book 11 (5% in)
  • These on the mountains once Achilles found, And captive led, with pliant osiers bound; Then to their sire for ample sums restored; But now to perish by Atrides' sword: Pierced in the breast the base-born Isus bleeds: Cleft through the head his brother's fate succeeds, Swift to the spoil the hasty victor falls, And, stript, their features to his mind recalls.
    Book 11 (18% in)
  • That hour Achilles, from the topmost height Of his proud fleet, o'erlook'd the fields of fight; His feasted eyes beheld around the plain The Grecian rout, the slaying, and the slain.
    Book 11 (75% in)
  • Meantime Patroclus, by Achilles sent, Unheard approached, and stood before the tent.
    Book 11 (81% in)
  • Old Nestor, rising then, the hero led To his high seat: the chief refused and said: " 'tis now no season for these kind delays; The great Achilles with impatience stays.
    Book 11 (81% in)
  • To great Achilles this respect I owe; Who asks, what hero, wounded by the foe, Was borne from combat by thy foaming steeds?
    Book 11 (82% in)
  • "Can then the sons of Greece (the sage rejoin'd) Excite compassion in Achilles' mind?
    Book 11 (82% in)
  • Achilles heeds not, but derides our pain: Even till the flames consume our fleet he stays, And waits the rising of the fatal blaze.
    Book 11 (83% in)
  • Achilles with unactive fury glows, And gives to passion what to Greece he owes.
    Book 11 (91% in)
  • Thyself, Achilles, and thy reverend sire Menoetius, turn'd the fragments on the fire.
    Book 11 (92% in)
  • Achilles sees us, to the feast invites; Social we sit, and share the genial rites.
    Book 11 (93% in)
  • Menoetius thus: 'Though great Achilles shine In strength superior, and of race divine, Yet cooler thoughts thy elder years attend; Let thy just counsels aid, and rule thy friend.'
    Book 11 (93% in)
  • Ah! try the utmost that a friend can say: Such gentle force the fiercest minds obey; Some favouring god Achilles' heart may move; Though deaf to glory, he may yield to love.
    Book 11 (94% in)
  • If some dire oracle his breast alarm, If aught from Heaven withhold his saving arm, Some beam of comfort yet on Greece may shine, If thou but lead the Myrmidonian line; Clad in Achilles' arms, if thou appear, Proud Troy may tremble, and desist from war; Press'd by fresh forces, her o'er-labour'd train Shall seek their walls, and Greece respire again."
    Book 11 (95% in)
  • But, thou, Patroclus! act a friendly part, Lead to my ships, and draw this deadly dart; With lukewarm water wash the gore away; With healing balms the raging smart allay, Such as sage Chiron, sire of pharmacy, Once taught Achilles, and Achilles thee.
    Book 11 (98% in)
  • But, thou, Patroclus! act a friendly part, Lead to my ships, and draw this deadly dart; With lukewarm water wash the gore away; With healing balms the raging smart allay, Such as sage Chiron, sire of pharmacy, Once taught Achilles, and Achilles thee.
    Book 11 (98% in)
  • Charged by Achilles' great command I fly, And bear with haste the Pylian king's reply: But thy distress this instant claims relief."
    Book 11 (99% in)
  • This stood while Hector and Achilles raged.
    Book 12 (5% in)
  • 'tis not your cause, Achilles' injured fame: Another's is the crime, but yours the shame.
    Book 13 (17% in)
  • In standing fight he mates Achilles' force, Excell'd alone in swiftness in the course.
    Book 13 (41% in)
  • I fear, I fear, lest Greece, not yet undone, Pay the large debt of last revolving sun; Achilles, great Achilles, yet remains On yonder decks, and yet o'erlooks the plains!"
    Book 13 (88% in)
  • I fear, I fear, lest Greece, not yet undone, Pay the large debt of last revolving sun; Achilles, great Achilles, yet remains On yonder decks, and yet o'erlooks the plains!"
    Book 13 (89% in)
  • And have I lived to see with mournful eyes In every Greek a new Achilles rise?
    Book 14 (13% in)
  • The god of ocean (to inflame their rage) Appears a warrior furrowed o'er with age; Press'd in his own, the general's hand he took, And thus the venerable hero spoke: "Atrides! lo! with what disdainful eye Achilles sees his country's forces fly; Blind, impious man! whose anger is his guide, Who glories in unutterable pride.
    Book 14 (29% in)
  • Lo! still he vaunts, and threats the fleet with fires, While stern Achilles in his wrath retires.
    Book 14 (70% in)
  • Greece chased by Troy, even to Achilles' fleet, Shall fall by thousands at the hero's feet.
    Book 15 (10% in)
  • Then, nor till then, shall great Achilles rise: And lo! that instant, godlike Hector dies.
    Book 15 (10% in)
  • The promise of a god I gave, and seal'd it with the almighty nod, Achilles' glory to the stars to raise; Such was our word, and fate the word obeys."
    Book 15 (11% in)
  • Charged with Achilles' high command I go, A mournful witness of this scene of woe; I haste to urge him by his country's care To rise in arms, and shine again in war.
    Book 15 (52% in)
  • ARGUMENT THE SIXTH BATTLE, THE ACTS AND DEATH OF PATROCLUS Patroclus (in pursuance of the request of Nestor in the eleventh book) entreats Achilles to suffer him to go to the assistance of the Greeks with Achilles' troops and armour.
    Book 16 (0% in)
  • ARGUMENT THE SIXTH BATTLE, THE ACTS AND DEATH OF PATROCLUS Patroclus (in pursuance of the request of Nestor in the eleventh book) entreats Achilles to suffer him to go to the assistance of the Greeks with Achilles' troops and armour.
    Book 16 (0% in)
  • Achilles offers a libation for the success of his friend, after which Patroclus leads the Myrmidons to battle.
    Book 16 (1% in)
  • The Trojans, at the sight of Patroclus in Achilles' armour, taking him for that hero, are cast into the uttermost consternation; he beats them off from the vessels, Hector himself flies, Sarpedon is killed, though Jupiter was averse to his fate.
    Book 16 (1% in)
  • Several other particulars of the battle are described; in the heat of which, Patroclus, neglecting the orders of Achilles, pursues the foe to the walls of Troy, where Apollo repulses and disarms him, Euphorbus wounds him, and Hector kills him, which concludes the book.
    Book 16 (2% in)
  • Meantime Patroclus to Achilles flies; The streaming tears fall copious from his eyes Not faster, trickling to the plains below, From the tall rock the sable waters flow.
    Book 16 (2% in)
  • Unfortunately good! a boding sigh Thy friend return'd; and with it, this reply: "Patroclus! thy Achilles knows no fears; Nor words from Jove nor oracles he hears; Nor aught a mother's caution can suggest; The tyrant's pride lies rooted in my breast.
    Book 16 (8% in)
  • Go then, Patroclus! court fair honour's charms In Troy's famed fields, and in Achilles' arms: Lead forth my martial Myrmidons to fight, Go save the fleets, and conquer in my right.
    Book 16 (10% in)
  • No camps, no bulwarks now the Trojans fear, Those are not dreadful, no Achilles there; No longer flames the lance of Tydeus' son; No more your general calls his heroes on: Hector, alone, I hear; his dreadful breath Commands your slaughter, or proclaims your death.
    Book 16 (11% in)
  • Divine Achilles view'd the rising flames, And smote his thigh, and thus aloud exclaims: "Arm, arm, Patroclus!
    Book 16 (16% in)
  • He cased his limbs in brass; and first around His manly legs, with silver buckles bound The clasping greaves; then to his breast applies The flaming cuirass of a thousand dyes; Emblazed with studs of gold his falchion shone In the rich belt, as in a starry zone: Achilles' shield his ample shoulders spread, Achilles' helmet nodded o'er his head: Adorn'd in all his terrible array, He flash'd around intolerable day.
    Book 16 (18% in)
  • He cased his limbs in brass; and first around His manly legs, with silver buckles bound The clasping greaves; then to his breast applies The flaming cuirass of a thousand dyes; Emblazed with studs of gold his falchion shone In the rich belt, as in a starry zone: Achilles' shield his ample shoulders spread, Achilles' helmet nodded o'er his head: Adorn'd in all his terrible array, He flash'd around intolerable day.
    Book 16 (18% in)
  • Whom the wing'd harpy, swift Podarge, bore, By Zephyr pregnant on the breezy shore: Swift Pedasus was added to their side, (Once great Aetion's, now Achilles' pride) Who, like in strength, in swiftness, and in grace, A mortal courser match'd the immortal race.
    Book 16 (19% in)
  • Achilles speeds from tent to tent, and warms His hardy Myrmidons to blood and arms.
    Book 16 (20% in)
  • High in the midst the great Achilles stands, Directs their order, and the war commands.
    Book 16 (21% in)
  • Soon as Achilles with superior care Had call'd the chiefs, and order'd all the war, This stern remembrance to his troops he gave: "Ye far-famed Myrmidons, ye fierce and brave!
    Book 16 (24% in)
  • But mindful of the gods, Achilles went To the rich coffer in his shady tent; There lay on heaps his various garments roll'd, And costly furs, and carpets stiff with gold, (The presents of the silver-footed dame) From thence he took a bowl, of antique frame, Which never man had stained with ruddy wine, Nor raised in offerings to the power divine, But Peleus' son; and Peleus' son to none Had raised in offerings, but to Jove alone.
    Book 16 (27% in)
  • Back to his tent the stern Achilles flies, And waits the combat with impatient eyes.
    Book 16 (31% in)
  • Thus from the tents the fervent legion swarms, So loud their clamours, and so keen their arms: Their rising rage Patroclus' breath inspires, Who thus inflames them with heroic fires: "O warriors, partners of Achilles' praise!
    Book 16 (32% in)
  • Think your Achilles sees you fight: be brave, And humble the proud monarch whom you save.
    Book 16 (33% in)
  • The war stood still, and all around them gazed, When great Achilles' shining armour blazed: Troy saw, and thought the dread Achilles nigh, At once they see, they tremble, and they fly.
    Book 16 (33% in)
  • The war stood still, and all around them gazed, When great Achilles' shining armour blazed: Troy saw, and thought the dread Achilles nigh, At once they see, they tremble, and they fly.
    Book 16 (33% in)
  • Two sounding darts the Lycian leader threw: The first aloof with erring fury flew, The next transpierced Achilles' mortal steed, The generous Pedasus of Theban breed: Fix'd in the shoulder's joint, he reel'd around, Roll'd in the bloody dust, and paw'd the slippery ground.
    Book 16 (55% in)
  • Now Greece gives way, and great Epigeus falls; Agacleus' son, from Budium's lofty walls; Who chased for murder thence a suppliant came To Peleus, and the silver-footed dame; Now sent to Troy, Achilles' arms to aid, He pays due vengeance to his kinsman's shade.
    Book 16 (67% in)
  • To crown Achilles' valiant friend with praise At length he dooms; and, that his last of days Shall set in glory, bids him drive the foe; Nor unattended see the shades below.
    Book 16 (76% in)
  • "Patroclus! cease; this heaven-defended wall Defies thy lance; not fated yet to fall; Thy friend, thy greater far, it shall withstand, Troy shall not stoop even to Achilles' hand."
    Book 16 (83% in)
  • Achilles' plume is stain'd with dust and gore; That plume which never stoop'd to earth before; Long used, untouch'd, in fighting fields to shine, And shade the temples of the mad divine.
    Book 16 (91% in)
  • I fought those towers to free, And guard that beauteous race from lords like thee: But thou a prey to vultures shalt be made; Thy own Achilles cannot lend thee aid; Though much at parting that great chief might say, And much enjoin thee, this important day.
    Book 16 (96% in)
  • But thou, imperious! hear my latest breath; The gods inspire it, and it sounds thy death: Insulting man, thou shalt be soon as I; Black fate o'erhangs thee, and thy hour draws nigh; Even now on life's last verge I see thee stand, I see thee fall, and by Achilles' hand."
    Book 16 (98% in)
  • Why not as well Achilles' fate be given To Hector's lance?
    Book 16 (99% in)
  • Aeneas and Hector Attempt the chariot of Achilles, which is borne off by Automedon.
    Book 17 (1% in)
  • The horses of Achilles deplore the loss of Patroclus: Jupiter covers his body with a thick darkness: the noble prayer of Ajax on that occasion.
    Book 17 (2% in)
  • Menelaus sends Antilochus to Achilles, with the news of Patroclus' death: then returns to the fight, where, though attacked with the utmost fury, he and Meriones, assisted by the Ajaces, bear off the body to the ships.
    Book 17 (2% in)
  • Meanwhile Apollo view'd with envious eyes, And urged great Hector to dispute the prize; (In Mentes' shape, beneath whose martial care The rough Ciconians learn'd the trade of war;)(247) "Forbear (he cried) with fruitless speed to chase Achilles' coursers, of ethereal race; They stoop not, these, to mortal man's command, Or stoop to none but great Achilles' hand.
    Book 17 (12% in)
  • Meanwhile Apollo view'd with envious eyes, And urged great Hector to dispute the prize; (In Mentes' shape, beneath whose martial care The rough Ciconians learn'd the trade of war;)(247) "Forbear (he cried) with fruitless speed to chase Achilles' coursers, of ethereal race; They stoop not, these, to mortal man's command, Or stoop to none but great Achilles' hand.
    Book 17 (12% in)
  • Yet, nor the god, nor heaven, should give me fear, Did but the voice of Ajax reach my ear: Still would we turn, still battle on the plains, And give Achilles all that yet remains Of his and our Patroclus—
    Book 17 (15% in)
  • Haste, and Patroclus' loved remains defend: The body to Achilles to restore Demands our care; alas, we can no more!
    Book 17 (18% in)
  • Greece with Achilles' friend should be repaid, And thus due honours purchased to his shade.
    Book 17 (23% in)
  • Hector in proud Achilles' arms shall shine, Torn from his friend, by right of conquest mine."
    Book 17 (26% in)
  • Now blazing in the immortal arms he stands; The work and present of celestial hands; By aged Peleus to Achilles given, As first to Peleus by the court of heaven: His father's arms not long Achilles wears, Forbid by fate to reach his father's years.
    Book 17 (28% in)
  • Now blazing in the immortal arms he stands; The work and present of celestial hands; By aged Peleus to Achilles given, As first to Peleus by the court of heaven: His father's arms not long Achilles wears, Forbid by fate to reach his father's years.
    Book 17 (28% in)
  • In heavenly panoply divinely bright Thou stand'st, and armies tremble at thy sight, As at Achilles' self! beneath thy dart Lies slain the great Achilles' dearer part.
    Book 17 (29% in)
  • In heavenly panoply divinely bright Thou stand'st, and armies tremble at thy sight, As at Achilles' self! beneath thy dart Lies slain the great Achilles' dearer part.
    Book 17 (29% in)
  • Exhorting loud through all the field he strode, And look'd, and moved, Achilles, or a god.
    Book 17 (31% in)
  • The youthful brothers thus for fame contend, Nor knew the fortune of Achilles' friend; In thought they view'd him still, with martial joy, Glorious in arms, and dealing death to Troy.
    Book 17 (53% in)
  • Achilles in his ships at distance lay, Nor knew the fatal fortune of the day; He, yet unconscious of Patroclus' fall, In dust extended under Ilion's wall, Expects him glorious from the conquered plain, And for his wish'd return prepares in vain; Though well he knew, to make proud Ilion bend Was more than heaven had destined to his friend.
    Book 17 (55% in)
  • Meantime, at distance from the scene of blood, The pensive steeds of great Achilles stood: Their godlike master slain before their eyes, They wept, and shared in human miseries.
    Book 17 (58% in)
  • Alas! thy friend is slain, and Hector wields Achilles' arms triumphant in the fields."
    Book 17 (64% in)
  • "Lo, to my sight, beyond our hope restored, Achilles' car, deserted of its lord!
    Book 17 (66% in)
  • Assuming Phoenix' shape on earth she falls, And in his well-known voice to Sparta calls: "And lies Achilles' friend, beloved by all, A prey to dogs beneath the Trojan wall?
    Book 17 (74% in)
  • "Now, now, Atrides! cast around thy sight; If yet Antilochus survives the fight, Let him to great Achilles' ear convey The fatal news"—Atrides hastes away.
    Book 17 (87% in)
  • Fly to the fleet, this instant fly, and tell The sad Achilles, how his loved-one fell: He too may haste the naked corse to gain: The arms are Hector's, who despoil'd the slain."
    Book 17 (91% in)
  • "Gone is Antilochus (the hero said); But hope not, warriors, for Achilles' aid: Though fierce his rage, unbounded be his woe, Unarm'd, he fights not with the Trojan foe.
    Book 17 (93% in)
  • The news of the death of Patroclus is brought to Achilles by Antilochus.
    Book 18 (0% in)
  • Iris appears to Achilles by the command of Juno, and orders him to show himself at the head of the intrenchments.
    Book 18 (1% in)
  • The grief of Achilles over the body of Patroclus.
    Book 18 (2% in)
  • The description of the wonderful works of Vulcan: and, lastly, that noble one of the shield of Achilles.
    Book 18 (3% in)
  • The latter part of the nine-and-twentieth day, and the night ensuing, take up this book: the scene is at Achilles' tent on the sea-shore, from whence it changes to the palace of Vulcan.
    Book 18 (3% in)
  • Meanwhile, where Hellespont's broad waters flow, Stood Nestor's son, the messenger of woe: There sat Achilles, shaded by his sails, On hoisted yards extended to the gales; Pensive he sat; for all that fate design'd Rose in sad prospect to his boding mind.
    Book 18 (4% in)
  • 'tis not in fate the alternate now to give; Patroclus dead, Achilles hates to live.
    Book 18 (18% in)
  • (Achilles made reply) Far lies Patroclus from his native plain!
    Book 18 (20% in)
  • Ah then, since from this miserable day I cast all hope of my return away; Since, unrevenged, a hundred ghosts demand The fate of Hector from Achilles' hand; Since here, for brutal courage far renown'd, I live an idle burden to the ground, (Others in council famed for nobler skill, More useful to preserve, than I to kill,) Let me—But oh! ye gracious powers above!
    Book 18 (20% in)
  • So shall Achilles fall! stretch'd pale and dead, No more the Grecian hope, or Trojan dread!
    Book 18 (23% in)
  • — Soon shall the sanguine torrent spread so wide, That all shall know Achilles swells the tide.
    Book 18 (24% in)
  • The various goddess of the showery bow, Shot in a whirlwind to the shore below; To great Achilles at his ships she came, And thus began the many-colour'd dame: "Rise, son of Peleus! rise, divinely brave!
    Book 18 (31% in)
  • Achilles thus.
    Book 18 (32% in)
  • That, in my friend's defence, has Ajax spread, While his strong lance around him heaps the dead: The gallant chief defends Menoetius' son, And does what his Achilles should have done."
    Book 18 (34% in)
  • Let but Achilles o'er yon trench appear, Proud Troy shall tremble, and consent to fear; Greece from one glance of that tremendous eye Shall take new courage, and disdain to fly."
    Book 18 (35% in)
  • As when from some beleaguer'd town arise The smokes, high curling to the shaded skies; (Seen from some island, o'er the main afar, When men distress'd hang out the sign of war;) Soon as the sun in ocean hides his rays, Thick on the hills the flaming beacons blaze; With long-projected beams the seas are bright, And heaven's high arch reflects the ruddy light: So from Achilles' head the splendours rise, Reflecting blaze on blaze against the skies.
    Book 18 (37% in)
  • But chief Achilles, bending down his head, Pours unavailing sorrows o'er the dead, Whom late triumphant, with his steeds and car, He sent refulgent to the field of war; (Unhappy change!
    Book 18 (40% in)
  • 'twas now no season for prolong'd debate; They saw Achilles, and in him their fate.
    Book 18 (42% in)
  • If great Achilles rise in all his might, His be the danger: I shall stand the fight.
    Book 18 (51% in)
  • So grieves Achilles; and, impetuous, vents To all his Myrmidons his loud laments.
    Book 18 (54% in)
  • Agamemnon and Achilles are solemnly reconciled: the speeches, presents, and ceremonies on that occasion.
    Book 19 (1% in)
  • Achilles is with great difficulty persuaded to refrain from the battle till the troops have refreshed themselves by the advice of Ulysses.
    Book 19 (2% in)
  • The presents are conveyed to the tent of Achilles, where Briseis laments over the body of Patroclus.
    Book 19 (2% in)
  • But go, Achilles, as affairs require, Before the Grecian peers renounce thine ire: Then uncontroll'd in boundless war engage, And heaven with strength supply the mighty rage!"
    Book 19 (12% in)
  • Achilles to the strand obedient went: The shores resounded with the voice he sent.
    Book 19 (14% in)
  • Achilles (rising in the midst) begun: "O monarch! better far had been the fate Of thee, of me, of all the Grecian state, If (ere the day when by mad passion sway'd, Rash we contended for the black-eyed maid) Preventing Dian had despatch'd her dart, And shot the shining mischief to the heart!
    Book 19 (17% in)
  • Nor charge on me, ye Greeks, the dire debate: Know, angry Jove, and all-compelling Fate, With fell Erinnys, urged my wrath that day When from Achilles' arms I forced the prey.
    Book 19 (23% in)
  • O king of nations! whose superior sway (Returns Achilles) all our hosts obey!
    Book 19 (34% in)
  • With strong repast to hearten every band; But let the presents to Achilles made, In full assembly of all Greece be laid.
    Book 19 (39% in)
  • Here then awhile let Greece assembled stay, Nor great Achilles grudge this short delay.
    Book 19 (43% in)
  • Then thus Achilles: "Hear, ye Greeks! and know Whate'er we feel, 'tis Jove inflicts the woe; Not else Atrides could our rage inflame, Nor from my arms, unwilling, force the dame.
    Book 19 (61% in)
  • Go then, ye chiefs! indulge the genial rite; Achilles waits ye, and expects the fight.
    Book 19 (63% in)
  • Achilles sought his tent.
    Book 19 (63% in)
  • The first loved consort of my virgin bed Before these eyes in fatal battle bled: My three brave brothers in one mournful day All trod the dark, irremeable way: Thy friendly hand uprear'd me from the plain, And dried my sorrows for a husband slain; Achilles' care you promised I should prove, The first, the dearest partner of his love; That rites divine should ratify the band, And make me empress in his native land.
    Book 19 (68% in)
  • If yet Achilles have a friend, whose care Is bent to please him, this request forbear; Till yonder sun descend, ah, let me pay To grief and anguish one abstemious day.
    Book 19 (70% in)
  • (thus his heart he vents) Once spread the inviting banquet in our tents: Thy sweet society, thy winning care, Once stay'd Achilles, rushing to the war.
    Book 19 (73% in)
  • I could not this, this cruel stroke attend; Fate claim'd Achilles, but might spare his friend.
    Book 19 (75% in)
  • Their mingled grief the sire of heaven survey'd, And thus with pity to his blue-eyed maid: "Is then Achilles now no more thy care, And dost thou thus desert the great in war?
    Book 19 (78% in)
  • So swift through ether the shrill harpy springs, The wide air floating to her ample wings, To great Achilles she her flight address'd, And pour'd divine ambrosia in his breast,(259) With nectar sweet, (refection of the gods!
    Book 19 (80% in)
  • ...So helms succeeding helms, so shields from shields, Catch the quick beams, and brighten all the fields; Broad glittering breastplates, spears with pointed rays, Mix in one stream, reflecting blaze on blaze; Thick beats the centre as the coursers bound; With splendour flame the skies, and laugh the fields around, Full in the midst, high-towering o'er the rest, His limbs in arms divine Achilles dress'd; Arms which the father of the fire bestow'd, Forged on the eternal anvils of the god.
    Book 19 (83% in)
  • And now he shakes his great paternal spear, Ponderous and huge, which not a Greek could rear, From Pelion's cloudy top an ash entire Old Chiron fell'd, and shaped it for his sire; A spear which stern Achilles only wields, The death of heroes, and the dread of fields.
    Book 19 (90% in)
  • All bright in heavenly arms, above his squire Achilles mounts, and sets the field on fire; Not brighter Phoebus in the ethereal way Flames from his chariot, and restores the day.
    Book 19 (92% in)
  • Achilles! yes! this day at least we bear Thy rage in safety through the files of war: But come it will, the fatal time must come, Not ours the fault, but God decrees thy doom.
    Book 19 (96% in)
  • Jupiter, upon Achilles' return to the battle, calls a council of the gods, and permits them to assist either party.
    Book 20 (0% in)
  • Apollo encourages AEneas to meet Achilles.
    Book 20 (1% in)
  • Achilles falls upon the rest of the Trojans, and is upon the point of killing Hector, but Apollo conveys him away in a cloud.
    Book 20 (2% in)
  • Achilles pursues the Trojans with a great slaughter.
    Book 20 (2% in)
  • Troy soon must lie o'erthrown, If uncontroll'd Achilles fights alone: Their troops but lately durst not meet his eyes; What can they now, if in his rage he rise?
    Book 20 (9% in)
  • Ere yet the gods their various aid employ, Each Argive bosom swell'd with manly joy, While great Achilles (terror of the plain), Long lost to battle, shone in arms again.
    Book 20 (12% in)
  • While thus the gods in various league engage, Achilles glow'd with more than mortal rage: Hector he sought; in search of Hector turn'd His eyes around, for Hector only burn'd; And burst like lightning through the ranks, and vow'd To glut the god of battles with his blood.
    Book 20 (20% in)
  • Then thus the hero of Anchises' strain: "To meet Pelides you persuade in vain: Already have I met, nor void of fear Observed the fury of his flying spear; From Ida's woods he chased us to the field, Our force he scattered, and our herds he kill'd; Lyrnessus, Pedasus in ashes lay; But (Jove assisting) I survived the day: Else had I sunk oppress'd in fatal fight By fierce Achilles and Minerva's might.
    Book 20 (23% in)
  • What mortal man Achilles can sustain?
    Book 20 (24% in)
  • To whom the son of Jove: "That god implore, And be what great Achilles was before.
    Book 20 (25% in)
  • But if the armipotent, or god of light, Obstruct Achilles, or commence the fight.
    Book 20 (30% in)
  • Amid both hosts (a dreadful space) appear, There great Achilles; bold AEneas, here.
    Book 20 (34% in)
  • So fierce Achilles on AEneas flies; So stands AEneas, and his force defies.
    Book 20 (37% in)
  • Seeks he to meet Achilles' arm in war, In hope the realms of Priam to enjoy, And prove his merits to the throne of Troy?
    Book 20 (38% in)
  • Grant that beneath thy lance Achilles dies, The partial monarch may refuse the prize; Sons he has many; those thy pride may quell: And 'tis his fault to love those sons too well, Or, in reward of thy victorious hand, Has Troy proposed some spacious tract of land An ample forest, or a fair domain, Of hills for vines, and arable for grain?
    Book 20 (38% in)
  • But can Achilles be so soon forgot?
    Book 20 (40% in)
  • Then rising ere he threw, The forceful spear of great Achilles flew, And pierced the Dardan shield's extremest bound, Where the shrill brass return'd a sharper sound: Through the thin verge the Pelean weapon glides, And the slight covering of expanded hides.
    Book 20 (55% in)
  • Achilles, rushing in with dreadful cries, Draws his broad blade, and at AEneas flies: AEneas rousing as the foe came on, With force collected, heaves a mighty stone: A mass enormous! which in modern days No two of earth's degenerate sons could raise.
    Book 20 (57% in)
  • Saw the distress, and moved the powers around: "Lo! on the brink of fate AEneas stands, An instant victim to Achilles' hands; By Phoebus urged; but Phoebus has bestow'd His aid in vain: the man o'erpowers the god.
    Book 20 (58% in)
  • The king of ocean to the fight descends, Through all the whistling darts his course he bends, Swift interposed between the warrior flies, And casts thick darkness o'er Achilles' eyes.
    Book 20 (63% in)
  • The godhead there (his heavenly form confess'd) With words like these the panting chief address'd: "What power, O prince! with force inferior far, Urged thee to meet Achilles' arm in war?
    Book 20 (65% in)
  • With that, he left him wondering as he lay, Then from Achilles chased the mist away: Sudden, returning with a stream of light, The scene of war came rushing on his sight.
    Book 20 (66% in)
  • But whatsoe'er Achilles can inspire, Whate'er of active force, or acting fire; Whate'er this heart can prompt, or hand obey; All, all Achilles, Greeks! is yours to-day.
    Book 20 (70% in)
  • But whatsoe'er Achilles can inspire, Whate'er of active force, or acting fire; Whate'er this heart can prompt, or hand obey; All, all Achilles, Greeks! is yours to-day.
    Book 20 (70% in)
  • Then fierce Achilles, shouting to the skies, On Troy's whole force with boundless fury flies.
    Book 20 (74% in)
  • Fierce as he springs, the sword his head divides: The parted visage falls on equal sides: With loud-resounding arms he strikes the plain; While thus Achilles glories o'er the slain: "Lie there, Otryntides! the Trojan earth Receives thee dead, though Gygae boast thy birth; Those beauteous fields where Hyllus' waves are roll'd, And plenteous Hermus swells with tides of gold, Are thine no more.
    Book 20 (76% in)
  • When Hector view'd, all ghastly in his gore, Thus sadly slain the unhappy Polydore, A cloud of sorrow overcast his sight, His soul no longer brook'd the distant fight: Full in Achilles' dreadful front he came, And shook his javelin like a waving flame.
    Book 20 (83% in)
  • And, lo! the man on whom black fates attend; The man, that slew Achilles, is his friend!
    Book 20 (84% in)
  • Then parts the lance: but Pallas' heavenly breath Far from Achilles wafts the winged death: The bidden dart again to Hector flies, And at the feet of its great master lies.
    Book 20 (86% in)
  • Achilles closes with his hated foe, His heart and eyes with flaming fury glow: But present to his aid, Apollo shrouds The favour'd hero in a veil of clouds.
    Book 20 (87% in)
  • But long thou shalt not thy just fate withstand, If any power assist Achilles' hand.
    Book 20 (88% in)
  • High o'er the scene of death Achilles stood, All grim with dust, all horrible in blood: Yet still insatiate, still with rage on flame; Such is the lust of never-dying fame!
    Book 20 (99% in)
  • (269) The Trojans fly before Achilles, some towards the town, others to the river Scamander: he falls upon the latter with great slaughter: takes twelve captives alive, to sacrifice to the shade of Patroclus; and kills Lycaon and Asteropeus.
    Book 21 (0% in)
  • Meanwhile Achilles continues the slaughter, drives the rest into Troy: Agenor only makes a stand, and is conveyed away in a cloud by Apollo; who (to delude Achilles) takes upon him Agenor's shape, and while he pursues him in that disguise, gives the Trojans an opportunity of retiring into their city.
    Book 21 (2% in)
  • Meanwhile Achilles continues the slaughter, drives the rest into Troy: Agenor only makes a stand, and is conveyed away in a cloud by Apollo; who (to delude Achilles) takes upon him Agenor's shape, and while he pursues him in that disguise, gives the Trojans an opportunity of retiring into their city.
    Book 21 (2% in)
  • As the scorch'd locusts from their fields retire, While fast behind them runs the blaze of fire; Driven from the land before the smoky cloud, The clustering legions rush into the flood: So, plunged in Xanthus by Achilles' force, Roars the resounding surge with men and horse.
    Book 21 (5% in)
  • His well-known face when great Achilles eyed, (The helm and visor he had cast aside With wild affright, and dropp'd upon the field His useless lance and unavailing shield,) As trembling, panting, from the stream he fled, And knock'd his faltering knees, the hero said.
    Book 21 (10% in)
  • Achilles raised the spear, prepared to wound; He kiss'd his feet, extended on the ground: And while, above, the spear suspended stood, Longing to dip its thirsty point in blood, One hand embraced them close, one stopp'd the dart, While thus these melting words attempt his heart: "Thy well-known captive, great Achilles! see, Once more Lycaon trembles at thy knee.
    Book 21 (13% in)
  • Achilles raised the spear, prepared to wound; He kiss'd his feet, extended on the ground: And while, above, the spear suspended stood, Longing to dip its thirsty point in blood, One hand embraced them close, one stopp'd the dart, While thus these melting words attempt his heart: "Thy well-known captive, great Achilles! see, Once more Lycaon trembles at thy knee.
    Book 21 (14% in)
  • Die then,"—He said; and as the word he spoke, The fainting stripling sank before the stroke: His hand forgot its grasp, and left the spear, While all his trembling frame confess'd his fear: Sudden, Achilles his broad sword display'd, And buried in his neck the reeking blade.
    Book 21 (20% in)
  • Thus he rewards you, with this bitter fate; Thus, till the Grecian vengeance is complete: Thus is atoned Patroclus' honour'd shade, And the short absence of Achilles paid."
    Book 21 (23% in)
  • What means divine may yet the power employ To check Achilles, and to rescue Troy?
    Book 21 (23% in)
  • (Fair Peribaea's love the god had crown'd, With all his refluent waters circled round:) On him Achilles rush'd; he fearless stood, And shook two spears, advancing from the flood; The flood impell'd him, on Pelides' head To avenge his waters choked with heaps of dead.
    Book 21 (24% in)
  • Near as they drew, Achilles thus began: "What art thou, boldest of the race of man?
    Book 21 (25% in)
  • Threatening he said: the hostile chiefs advance; At once Asteropeus discharged each lance, (For both his dexterous hands the lance could wield,) One struck, but pierced not, the Vulcanian shield; One razed Achilles' hand; the spouting blood Spun forth; in earth the fasten'd weapon stood.
    Book 21 (27% in)
  • In human form, confess'd before his eyes, The river thus; and thus the chief replies: "O sacred stream! thy word we shall obey; But not till Troy the destined vengeance pay, Not till within her towers the perjured train Shall pant, and tremble at our arms again; Not till proud Hector, guardian of her wall, Or stain this lance, or see Achilles fall."
    Book 21 (35% in)
  • He like the warlike eagle speeds his pace (Swiftest and strongest of the aerial race); Far as a spear can fly, Achilles springs; At every bound his clanging armour rings: Now here, now there, he turns on every side, And winds his course before the following tide; The waves flow after, wheresoe'er he wheels, And gather fast, and murmur at his heels.
    Book 21 (40% in)
  • Still flies Achilles, but before his eyes Still swift Scamander rolls where'er he flies: Not all his speed escapes the rapid floods; The first of men, but not a match for gods.
    Book 21 (43% in)
  • Tired by the tides, his knees relax with toil; Wash'd from beneath him slides the slimy soil; When thus (his eyes on heaven's expansion thrown) Forth bursts the hero with an angry groan: "Is there no god Achilles to befriend, No power to avert his miserable end?
    Book 21 (44% in)
  • Achilles meets a shameful fate, Oh how unworthy of the brave and great!
    Book 21 (46% in)
  • Then, murmuring from his beds, he boils, he raves, And a foam whitens on the purple waves: At every step, before Achilles stood The crimson surge, and deluged him with blood.
    Book 21 (54% in)
  • Through blood, through death, Achilles still proceeds, O'er slaughter'd heroes, and o'er rolling steeds.
    Book 21 (84% in)
  • As when avenging flames with fury driven On guilty towns exert the wrath of heaven; The pale inhabitants, some fall, some fly; And the red vapours purple all the sky: So raged Achilles: death and dire dismay, And toils, and terrors, fill'd the dreadful day.
    Book 21 (85% in)
  • Enraged Achilles follows with his spear; Wild with revenge, insatiable of war.
    Book 21 (88% in)
  • When now the generous youth Achilles spies.
    Book 21 (90% in)
  • Even now perhaps, ere yet I turn the wall, The fierce Achilles sees me, and I fall: Such is his swiftness, 'tis in vain to fly, And such his valour, that who stands must die.
    Book 21 (92% in)
  • Not less resolved, Antenor's valiant heir Confronts Achilles, and awaits the war, Disdainful of retreat: high held before, His shield (a broad circumference) he bore; Then graceful as he stood, in act to throw The lifted javelin, thus bespoke the foe: "How proud Achilles glories in his fame!
    Book 21 (95% in)
  • Not less resolved, Antenor's valiant heir Confronts Achilles, and awaits the war, Disdainful of retreat: high held before, His shield (a broad circumference) he bore; Then graceful as he stood, in act to throw The lifted javelin, thus bespoke the foe: "How proud Achilles glories in his fame!
    Book 21 (95% in)
  • Pale Troy against Achilles shuts her gate: And nations breathe, deliver'd from their fate.
    Book 21 (**% in)
  • The Trojans being safe within the walls, Hector only stays to oppose Achilles.
    Book 22 (0% in)
  • Hector consults within himself what measures to take; but at the advance of Achilles, his resolution fails him, and he flies.
    Book 22 (1% in)
  • Achilles pursues him thrice round the walls of Troy.
    Book 22 (1% in)
  • The gods debate concerning the fate of Hector; at length Minerva descends to the aid of Achilles.
    Book 22 (2% in)
  • Achilles drags the dead body at his chariot in the sight of Priam and Hecuba.
    Book 22 (2% in)
  • Apollo now to tired Achilles turns: (The power confess'd in all his glory burns:) "And what (he cries) has Peleus' son in view, With mortal speed a godhead to pursue?
    Book 22 (5% in)
  • Then wept the sage: He strikes his reverend head, now white with age; He lifts his wither'd arms; obtests the skies; He calls his much-loved son with feeble cries: The son, resolved Achilles' force to dare, Full at the Scaean gates expects the war; While the sad father on the rampart stands, And thus adjures him with extended hands: "Ah stay not, stay not! guardless and alone; Hector! my loved, my dearest, bravest son!
    Book 22 (10% in)
  • Implacable Achilles! might'st thou be To all the gods no dearer than to me!
    Book 22 (11% in)
  • Yet shun Achilles! enter yet the wall; And spare thyself, thy father, spare us all!
    Book 22 (14% in)
  • He leaves the gates, he leaves the wall behind: Achilles follows like the winged wind.
    Book 22 (30% in)
  • My heart partakes the generous Hector's pain; Hector, whose zeal whole hecatombs has slain, Whose grateful fumes the gods received with joy, From Ida's summits, and the towers of Troy: Now see him flying; to his fears resign'd, And fate, and fierce Achilles, close behind.
    Book 22 (37% in)
  • Thus step by step, where'er the Trojan wheel'd, There swift Achilles compass'd round the field.
    Book 22 (40% in)
  • Oft as to reach the Dardan gates he bends, And hopes the assistance of his pitying friends, (Whose showering arrows, as he coursed below, From the high turrets might oppress the foe,) So oft Achilles turns him to the plain: He eyes the city, but he eyes in vain.
    Book 22 (41% in)
  • Phoebus it was; who, in his latest hour, Endued his knees with strength, his nerves with power: And great Achilles, lest some Greek's advance Should snatch the glory from his lifted lance, Sign'd to the troops to yield his foe the way, And leave untouch'd the honours of the day.
    Book 22 (42% in)
  • Come then, the glorious conflict let us try, Let the steel sparkle, and the javelin fly; Or let us stretch Achilles on the field, Or to his arm our bloody trophies yield.
    Book 22 (49% in)
  • "Talk not of oaths (the dreadful chief replies, While anger flash'd from his disdainful eyes), Detested as thou art, and ought to be, Nor oath nor pact Achilles plights with thee: Such pacts as lambs and rabid wolves combine, Such leagues as men and furious lions join, To such I call the gods! one constant state Of lasting rancour and eternal hate: No thought but rage, and never-ceasing strife, Till death extinguish rage, and thought, and life.
    Book 22 (52% in)
  • Minerva watch'd it falling on the land, Then drew, and gave to great Achilles' hand, Unseen of Hector, who, elate with joy, Now shakes his lance, and braves the dread of Troy.
    Book 22 (55% in)
  • Fierce, at the word, his weighty sword he drew, And, all collected, on Achilles flew.
    Book 22 (60% in)
  • Nor less Achilles his fierce soul prepares: Before his breast the flaming shield he bears, Refulgent orb! above his fourfold cone The gilded horse-hair sparkled in the sun.
    Book 22 (61% in)
  • As radiant Hesper shines with keener light,(277) Far-beaming o'er the silver host of night, When all the starry train emblaze the sphere: So shone the point of great Achilles' spear.
    Book 22 (62% in)
  • Prone on the field the bleeding warrior lies, While, thus triumphing, stern Achilles cries: "At last is Hector stretch'd upon the plain, Who fear'd no vengeance for Patroclus slain: Then, prince! you should have fear'd, what now you feel; Achilles absent was Achilles still: Yet a short space the great avenger stayed, Then low in dust thy strength and glory laid.
    Book 22 (64% in)
  • Prone on the field the bleeding warrior lies, While, thus triumphing, stern Achilles cries: "At last is Hector stretch'd upon the plain, Who fear'd no vengeance for Patroclus slain: Then, prince! you should have fear'd, what now you feel; Achilles absent was Achilles still: Yet a short space the great avenger stayed, Then low in dust thy strength and glory laid.
    Book 22 (64% in)
  • Prone on the field the bleeding warrior lies, While, thus triumphing, stern Achilles cries: "At last is Hector stretch'd upon the plain, Who fear'd no vengeance for Patroclus slain: Then, prince! you should have fear'd, what now you feel; Achilles absent was Achilles still: Yet a short space the great avenger stayed, Then low in dust thy strength and glory laid.
    Book 22 (64% in)
  • Achilles, musing as he roll'd his eyes O'er the dead hero, thus unheard, replies: "Die thou the first!
    Book 22 (70% in)
  • High o'er the slain the great Achilles stands, Begirt with heroes and surrounding bands; And thus aloud, while all the host attends: "Princes and leaders! countrymen and friends!
    Book 22 (72% in)
  • But much I fear my Hector's dauntless breast Confronts Achilles; chased along the plain, Shut from our walls!
    Book 22 (89% in)
  • (280) Achilles and the Myrmidons do honours to the body of Patroclus.
    Book 23 (0% in)
  • Achilles sacrifices several animals, and lastly twelve Trojan captives, at the pile; then sets fire to it.
    Book 23 (1% in)
  • Achilles institutes the funeral games: the chariot-race, the fight of the caestus, the wrestling, the foot-race, the single combat, the discus, the shooting with arrows, the darting the javelin: the various descriptions of which, and the various success of the several antagonists, make the greatest part of the book.
    Book 23 (2% in)
  • The night following, the ghost of Patroclus appears to Achilles: the one-and-thirtieth day is employed in felling the timber for the pile: the two-and-thirtieth in burning it; and the three-and-thirtieth in the games.
    Book 23 (2% in)
  • The Grecians seek their ships, and clear the strand, All, but the martial Myrmidonian band: These yet assembled great Achilles holds, And the stern purpose of his mind unfolds: "Not yet, my brave companions of the war, Release your smoking coursers from the car; But, with his chariot each in order led, Perform due honours to Patroclus dead.
    Book 23 (3% in)
  • The troops obey'd; and thrice in order led(281) (Achilles first) their coursers round the dead; And thrice their sorrows and laments renew; Tears bathe their arms, and tears the sands bedew.
    Book 23 (4% in)
  • Achilles' promise is complete; The bloody Hector stretch'd before thy feet.
    Book 23 (5% in)
  • All to Achilles' sable ship repair, Frequent and full, the genial feast to share.
    Book 23 (6% in)
  • The form familiar hover'd o'er his head, "And sleeps Achilles?
    Book 23 (10% in)
  • (thus the phantom said:) Sleeps my Achilles, his Patroclus dead?
    Book 23 (11% in)
  • Now give thy hand; for to the farther shore When once we pass, the soul returns no more: When once the last funereal flames ascend, No more shall meet Achilles and his friend; No more our thoughts to those we loved make known; Or quit the dearest, to converse alone.
    Book 23 (12% in)
  • The wood the Grecians cleave, prepared to burn; And the slow mules the same rough road return The sturdy woodmen equal burdens bore (Such charge was given them) to the sandy shore; There on the spot which great Achilles show'd, They eased their shoulders, and disposed the load; Circling around the place, where times to come Shall view Patroclus' and Achilles' tomb.
    Book 23 (17% in)
  • The wood the Grecians cleave, prepared to burn; And the slow mules the same rough road return The sturdy woodmen equal burdens bore (Such charge was given them) to the sandy shore; There on the spot which great Achilles show'd, They eased their shoulders, and disposed the load; Circling around the place, where times to come Shall view Patroclus' and Achilles' tomb.
    Book 23 (17% in)
  • The chariots first proceed, a shining train; Then clouds of foot that smoke along the plain; Next these the melancholy band appear; Amidst, lay dead Patroclus on the bier; O'er all the corse their scattered locks they throw; Achilles next, oppress'd with mighty woe, Supporting with his hands the hero's head, Bends o'er the extended body of the dead.
    Book 23 (18% in)
  • But great Achilles stands apart in prayer, And from his head divides the yellow hair; Those curling locks which from his youth he vow'd,(287) And sacred grew, to Sperchius' honour'd flood: Then sighing, to the deep his locks he cast, And roll'd his eyes around the watery waste: "Sperchius! whose waves in mazy errors lost Delightful roll along my native coast!
    Book 23 (19% in)
  • So vow'd my father, but he vow'd in vain; No more Achilles sees his native plain; In that vain hope these hairs no longer grow, Patroclus bears them to the shades below."
    Book 23 (20% in)
  • (288) A hundred foot in length, a hundred wide, The growing structure spreads on every side; High on the top the manly corse they lay, And well-fed sheep and sable oxen slay: Achilles covered with their fat the dead, And the piled victims round the body spread; Then jars of honey, and of fragrant oil, Suspends around, low-bending o'er the pile.
    Book 23 (22% in)
  • Behold Achilles' promise fully paid, Twelve Trojan heroes offer'd to thy shade; But heavier fates on Hector's corse attend, Saved from the flames, for hungry dogs to rend."
    Book 23 (23% in)
  • Nor yet the pile, where dead Patroclus lies, Smokes, nor as yet the sullen flames arise; But, fast beside, Achilles stood in prayer, Invoked the gods whose spirit moves the air, And victims promised, and libations cast, To gentle Zephyr and the Boreal blast: He call'd the aerial powers, along the skies To breathe, and whisper to the fires to rise.
    Book 23 (25% in)
  • All night Achilles hails Patroclus' soul, With large libations from the golden bowl.
    Book 23 (28% in)
  • As a poor father, helpless and undone, Mourns o'er the ashes of an only son, Takes a sad pleasure the last bones to burn, And pours in tears, ere yet they close the urn: So stay'd Achilles, circling round the shore, So watch'd the flames, till now they flame no more.
    Book 23 (28% in)
  • Then parting from the pile he ceased to weep, And sank to quiet in the embrace of sleep, Exhausted with his grief: meanwhile the crowd Of thronging Grecians round Achilles stood; The tumult waked him: from his eyes he shook Unwilling slumber, and the chiefs bespoke: "Ye kings and princes of the Achaian name!
    Book 23 (30% in)
  • They mount their seats; the lots their place dispose (Roll'd in his helmet, these Achilles throws).
    Book 23 (42% in)
  • Last came, Admetus! thy unhappy son; Slow dragged the steeds his batter'd chariot on: Achilles saw, and pitying thus begun: "Behold! the man whose matchless art surpass'd The sons of Greece! the ablest, yet the last!
    Book 23 (59% in)
  • Thus spake the youth; nor did his words offend; Pleased with the well-turn'd flattery of a friend, Achilles smiled: "The gift proposed (he cried), Antilochus! we shall ourself provide.
    Book 23 (61% in)
  • Achilles this to reverend Nestor bears.
    Book 23 (67% in)
  • Proud of the gift, thus spake the full of days: Achilles heard him, prouder of the praise.
    Book 23 (72% in)
  • Achilles rising, thus: "Let Greece excite Two heroes equal to this hardy fight; Who dare the foe with lifted arms provoke, And rush beneath the long-descending stroke.
    Book 23 (72% in)
  • The third bold game Achilles next demands, And calls the wrestlers to the level sands: A massy tripod for the victor lies, Of twice six oxen its reputed price; And next, the loser's spirits to restore, A female captive, valued but at four.
    Book 23 (77% in)
  • Defiled with honourable dust they roll, Still breathing strife, and unsubdued of soul: Again they rage, again to combat rise; When great Achilles thus divides the prize: "Your noble vigour, O my friends, restrain; Nor weary out your generous strength in vain.
    Book 23 (81% in)
  • Achilles rising then bespoke the train: "Who hope the palm of swiftness to obtain, Stand forth, and bear these prizes from the plain."
    Book 23 (83% in)
  • Achilles only boasts a swifter pace: For who can match Achilles?
    Book 23 (88% in)
  • Achilles only boasts a swifter pace: For who can match Achilles?
    Book 23 (88% in)
  • This mighty quoit Aetion wont to rear, And from his whirling arm dismiss in air; The giant by Achilles slain, he stow'd Among his spoils this memorable load.
    Book 23 (92% in)
  • To close the funeral games, Achilles last A massy spear amid the circle placed, And ample charger of unsullied frame, With flowers high-wrought, not blacken'd yet by flame.
    Book 23 (98% in)
  • Jupiter sends Thetis to Achilles, to dispose him for the restoring it, and Iris to Priam, to encourage him to go in person and treat for it.
    Book 24 (0% in)
  • Mercury descends in the shape of a young man, and conducts him to the pavilion of Achilles.
    Book 24 (1% in)
  • Priam finds Achilles at his table, casts himself at his feet, and begs for the body of his son: Achilles, moved with compassion, grants his request, detains him one night in his tent, and the next morning sends him home with the body: the Trojans run out to meet him.
    Book 24 (1% in)
  • Priam finds Achilles at his table, casts himself at his feet, and begs for the body of his son: Achilles, moved with compassion, grants his request, detains him one night in his tent, and the next morning sends him home with the body: the Trojans run out to meet him.
    Book 24 (2% in)
  • The time of twelve days is employed in this book, while the body of Hector lies in the tent of Achilles; and as many more are spent in the truce allowed for his interment.
    Book 24 (2% in)
  • The scene is partly in Achilles' camp, and partly in Troy.
    Book 24 (3% in)
  • Not so Achilles: he, to grief resign'd, His friend's dear image present to his mind, Takes his sad couch, more unobserved to weep; Nor tastes the gifts of all-composing sleep.
    Book 24 (3% in)
  • Is then the dire Achilles all your care?
    Book 24 (8% in)
  • But Hector only boasts a mortal claim, His birth deriving from a mortal dame: Achilles, of your own ethereal race, Springs from a goddess by a man's embrace (A goddess by ourself to Peleus given, A man divine, and chosen friend of heaven) To grace those nuptials, from the bright abode Yourselves were present; where this minstrel-god, Well pleased to share the feast, amid the quire Stood proud to hymn, and tune his youthful lyre."
    Book 24 (10% in)
  • To whom Achilles: "Be the ransom given, And we submit, since such the will of heaven."
    Book 24 (19% in)
  • Alone the Ilian ramparts let him leave, And bear what stern Achilles may receive: Alone, for so we will; no Trojan near Except, to place the dead with decent care, Some aged herald, who with gentle hand May the slow mules and funeral car command.
    Book 24 (20% in)
  • Nor let him death, nor let him danger dread, Safe through the foe by our protection led: Him Hermes to Achilles shall convey, Guard of his life, and partner of his way.
    Book 24 (21% in)
  • Fierce as he is, Achilles' self shall spare His age, nor touch one venerable hair: Some thought there must be in a soul so brave, Some sense of duty, some desire to save."
    Book 24 (21% in)
  • Before the king Jove's messenger appears, And thus in whispers greets his trembling ears: "Fear not, O father! no ill news I bear; From Jove I come, Jove makes thee still his care; For Hector's sake these walls he bids thee leave, And bear what stern Achilles may receive; Alone, for so he wills; no Trojan near, Except, to place the dead with decent care, Some aged herald, who with gentle hand May the slow mules and funeral car command.
    Book 24 (23% in)
  • Fierce as he is, Achilles' self shall spare Thy age, nor touch one venerable hair; Some thought there must be in a soul so brave, Some sense of duty, some desire to save."
    Book 24 (24% in)
  • Partake the troubles of thy husband's breast: I saw descend the messenger of Jove, Who bids me try Achilles' mind to move; Forsake these ramparts, and with gifts obtain The corse of Hector, at yon navy slain.
    Book 24 (25% in)
  • To stern Achilles now direct my ways, And teach him mercy when a father prays.
    Book 24 (39% in)
  • Then thus to Hermes: "Thou whose constant cares Still succour mortals, and attend their prayers; Behold an object to thy charge consign'd: If ever pity touch'd thee for mankind, Go, guard the sire: the observing foe prevent, And safe conduct him to Achilles' tent."
    Book 24 (43% in)
  • Oft have these eyes that godlike Hector view'd In glorious fight, with Grecian blood embrued: I saw him when, like Jove, his flames he toss'd On thousand ships, and wither'd half a host: I saw, but help'd not: stern Achilles' ire Forbade assistance, and enjoy'd the fire.
    Book 24 (49% in)
  • Still as Aurora's ruddy beam is spread, Round his friend's tomb Achilles drags the dead: Yet undisfigured, or in limb or face, All fresh he lies, with every living grace, Majestical in death!
    Book 24 (52% in)
  • Large was the door, whose well-compacted strength A solid pine-tree barr'd of wondrous length: Scarce three strong Greeks could lift its mighty weight, But great Achilles singly closed the gate.
    Book 24 (56% in)
  • This Hermes (such the power of gods) set wide; Then swift alighted the celestial guide, And thus reveal'd—"Hear, prince! and understand Thou ow'st thy guidance to no mortal hand: Hermes I am, descended from above, The king of arts, the messenger of Jove, Farewell: to shun Achilles' sight I fly; Uncommon are such favours of the sky, Nor stand confess'd to frail mortality.
    Book 24 (57% in)
  • Thus having said, he vanish'd from his eyes, And in a moment shot into the skies: The king, confirm'd from heaven, alighted there, And left his aged herald on the car, With solemn pace through various rooms he went, And found Achilles in his inner tent: There sat the hero: Alcimus the brave, And great Automedon, attendance gave: These served his person at the royal feast; Around, at awful distance, stood the rest.
    Book 24 (58% in)
  • Unseen by these, the king his entry made: And, prostrate now before Achilles laid, Sudden (a venerable sight!
    Book 24 (59% in)
  • As when a wretch (who, conscious of his crime, Pursued for murder, flies his native clime) Just gains some frontier, breathless, pale, amazed, All gaze, all wonder: thus Achilles gazed: Thus stood the attendants stupid with surprise: All mute, yet seem'd to question with their eyes: Each look'd on other, none the silence broke, Till thus at last the kingly suppliant spoke: "Ah think, thou favour'd of the powers divine!
    Book 24 (60% in)
  • Now each by turns indulged the gush of woe; And now the mingled tides together flow: This low on earth, that gently bending o'er; A father one, and one a son deplore: But great Achilles different passions rend, And now his sire he mourns, and now his friend.
    Book 24 (64% in)
  • Satiate at length with unavailing woes, From the high throne divine Achilles rose; The reverend monarch by the hand he raised; On his white beard and form majestic gazed, Not unrelenting; then serene began With words to soothe the miserable man: "Alas, what weight of anguish hast thou known, Unhappy prince! thus guardless and alone Two pass through foes, and thus undaunted face The man whose fury has destroy'd thy race!
    Book 24 (65% in)
  • "Move me no more, (Achilles thus replies, While kindling anger sparkled in his eyes,) Nor seek by tears my steady soul to bend: To yield thy Hector I myself intend: For know, from Jove my goddess-mother came, (Old Ocean's daughter, silver-footed dame,) Nor comest thou but by heaven; nor comest alone, Some god impels with courage not thy own: No human hand the weighty gates unbarr'd, Nor could the boldest of our youth have dared To pass our outworks, or elude the guard.
    Book 24 (70% in)
  • Achilles, like a lion, rush'd abroad: Automedon and Alcimus attend, (Whom most he honour'd, since he lost his friend,) These to unyoke the mules and horses went, And led the hoary herald to the tent; Next, heap'd on high, the numerous presents bear, (Great Hector's ransom,) from the polish'd car.
    Book 24 (72% in)
  • This done, the garments o'er the corse they spread; Achilles lifts it to the funeral bed: Then, while the body on the car they laid, He groans, and calls on loved Patroclus' shade: "If, in that gloom which never light must know, The deeds of mortals touch the ghosts below, O friend! forgive me, that I thus fulfil (Restoring Hector) heaven's unquestion'd will.
    Book 24 (73% in)
  • With that, Achilles bade prepare the bed, With purple soft and shaggy carpets spread; Forth, by the flaming lights, they bend their way, And place the couches, and the coverings lay.
    Book 24 (80% in)
  • While all my other sons in barbarous bands Achilles bound, and sold to foreign lands, This felt no chains, but went a glorious ghost, Free, and a hero, to the Stygian coast.
    Book 24 (93% in)
  • On all around the infectious sorrow grows; But Priam check'd the torrent as it rose: "Perform, ye Trojans! what the rites require, And fell the forests for a funeral pyre; Twelve days, nor foes nor secret ambush dread; Achilles grants these honours to the dead.
    Book 24 (97% in)
  • We have now passed through the Iliad, and seen the anger of Achilles, and the terrible effects of it, at an end, as that only was the subject of the poem, and the nature of epic poetry would not permit our author to proceed to the event of the war, it perhaps may be acceptable to the common reader to give a short account of what happened to Troy and the chief actors in this poem after the conclusion of it.
    Concluding Note (3% in)
  • Achilles fell before Troy, by the hand of Paris, by the shot of an arrow in his heel, as Hector had prophesied at his death, lib. xxii.
    Concluding Note (21% in)
  • The unfortunate Priam was killed by Pyrrhus, the son of Achilles.
    Concluding Note (28% in)
  • Ajax, after the death of Achilles, had a contest with Ulysses for the armour of Vulcan, but being defeated in his aim, he slew himself through indignation.
    Concluding Note (29% in)
  • 57 Eustathius, after Heraclides Ponticus and others, allegorizes this apparition, as if the appearance of Minerva to Achilles, unseen by the rest, was intended to point out the sudden recollection that he would gain nothing by intemperate wrath, and that it were best to restrain his anger, and only gratify it by withdrawing his services.
    Footnotes (18% in)
  • Her children were all destroyed by fire through her attempts to see whether they were immortal, and Achilles would have shared the same fate had not his father rescued him.
    Footnotes (20% in)
  • The reason ascribed for the glaring improbability that the Greeks should have left their camp and fleet unfortified during nine years, in the midst of a hostile country, is a purely poetical one: 'So long as Achilles fought, the terror of his name sufficed to keep every foe at a distance.'
    Footnotes (57% in)
  • Here, then, in the anomaly as in the propriety of the Iliad, the destiny of Achilles, or rather this peculiar crisis of it, forms the pervading bond of connexion to the whole poem.
    Footnotes (57% in)
  • (Hallam, Middle Ages, ch. x. pt. 1, p. 189) This fact frees Achilles from the apparent charge of sordidness.
    Footnotes (63% in)
  • 4), says, "We cannot commend Phoenix, the tutor of Achilles, as if he spoke correctly, when counselling him to accept of presents and assist the Greeks, but, without presents, not to desist from his wrath, nor again, should we commend Achilles himself, or approve of his being so covetous as to receive presents from Agamemnon," &c.
    Footnotes (63% in)
  • 4), says, "We cannot commend Phoenix, the tutor of Achilles, as if he spoke correctly, when counselling him to accept of presents and assist the Greeks, but, without presents, not to desist from his wrath, nor again, should we commend Achilles himself, or approve of his being so covetous as to receive presents from Agamemnon," &c.
    Footnotes (63% in)
  • 202 It may be observed, that, brief as is the mention of Briseis in the Iliad, and small the part she plays—what little is said is pre-eminently calculated to enhance her fitness to be the bride of Achilles.
    Footnotes (63% in)
  • 204 "Agamemnon, when he offers to transfer to Achilles seven towns inhabited by wealthy husbandmen, who would enrich their lord by presents and tribute, seems likewise to assume rather a property in them, than an authority over them.
    Footnotes (64% in)
  • Such a one was that of which Achilles now speaks.
    Footnotes (65% in)
  • 208 —_Pthia,_ the capital of Achilles' Thessalian domains.
    Footnotes (65% in)
  • The argument of the Iliad mainly turns on the affection of Achilles for Patroclus, whose love for the greater hero is only tempered by reverence for his higher birth and his unequalled prowess.
    Footnotes (76% in)
  • The siege of Troy was as little like a modern siege as a captain in the guards is like Achilles.
    Footnotes (79% in)
  • 250 This is connected with the earlier part of last book, the regular narrative being interrupted by the message of Antilochus and the lamentations of Achilles.
    Footnotes (80% in)
  • 269 "Perhaps the boldest excursion of Homer into this region of poetical fancy is the collision into which, in the twenty-first of the Iliad, he has brought the river god Scamander, first with Achilles, and afterwards with Vulcan, when summoned by Juno to the hero's aid.
    Footnotes (87% in)
  • _ Plutarch states that Alexander, in after times, renewed these same honours to the memory of Achilles himself.
    Footnotes (91% in)
  • The whole scene between Achilles and Priam, when the latter comes to the Greek camp for the purpose of redeeming the body of Hector, is at once the most profoundly skilful, and yet the simplest and most affecting passage in the Iliad.
    Footnotes (95% in)
  • Observe the exquisite taste of Priam in occupying the mind of Achilles, from the outset, with the image of his father; in gradually introducing the parallel of his own situation; and, lastly, mentioning Hector's name when he perceives that the hero is softened, and then only in such a manner as to flatter the pride of the conqueror.
    Footnotes (96% in)
  • 296 "Achilles' ferocious treatment of the corpse of Hector cannot but offend as referred to the modern standard of humanity.
    Footnotes (97% in)
  • The complaint of the ghost of Patroclus to Achilles, of but a brief postponement of his own obsequies, shows how efficacious their refusal to the remains of his destroyer must have been in satiating the thirst of revenge, which, even after death, was supposed to torment the dwellers in Hades.
    Footnotes (97% in)
  • Hence before yielding up the body of Hector to Priam, Achilles asks pardon of Patroclus for even this partial cession of his just rights of retribution.
    Footnotes (98% in)
  • 298 The following observations of Coleridge furnish a most gallant and interesting view of Helen's character— "Few things are more interesting than to observe how the same hand that has given us the fury and inconsistency of Achilles, gives us also the consummate elegance and tenderness of Helen.
    Footnotes (98% in)
  • 299 "And here we part with Achilles at the moment best calculated to exalt and purify our impression of his character.
    Footnotes (99% in)

There are no more uses of "Achilles" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®