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herald
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope)

44 uses
  • 82 It was the herald's duty to make the people sit down.
    Footnotes (27% in)
  • To wait his will two sacred heralds stood, Talthybius and Eurybates the good.
    Book 1 (55% in)
  • The unwilling heralds act their lord's commands; Pensive they walk along the barren sands: Arrived, the hero in his tent they find, With gloomy aspect on his arm reclined.
    Book 1 (56% in)
  • But witness, heralds, and proclaim my vow, Witness to gods above, and men below!
    Book 1 (58% in)
  • Patroclus now the unwilling beauty brought; She, in soft sorrows, and in pensive thought, Pass'd silent, as the heralds held her hand, And of look'd back, slow-moving o'er the strand.
    Book 1 (59% in)
  • The king despatch'd his heralds with commands To range the camp and summon all the bands: The gathering hosts the monarch's word obey; While to the fleet Atrides bends his way.
    Book 2 (9% in)
  • Nine sacred heralds now, proclaiming loud(82) The monarch's will, suspend the listening crowd.
    Book 2 (14% in)
  • 'twas thus the general voice the hero praised, Who, rising, high the imperial sceptre raised: The blue-eyed Pallas, his celestial friend, (In form a herald,) bade the crowds attend.
    Book 2 (35% in)
  • Now bid thy heralds sound the loud alarms, And call the squadrons sheathed in brazen arms; Now seize the occasion, now the troops survey, And lead to war when heaven directs the way.
    Book 2 (51% in)
  • He said; the monarch issued his commands; Straight the loud heralds call the gathering bands The chiefs inclose their king; the hosts divide, In tribes and nations rank'd on either side.
    Book 2 (51% in)
  • Two heralds now, despatch'd to Troy, invite The Phrygian monarch to the peaceful rite.
    Book 3 (30% in)
  • Meantime the heralds, through the crowded town.
    Book 3 (56% in)
  • On either side a sacred herald stands, The wine they mix, and on each monarch's hands Pour the full urn; then draws the Grecian lord His cutlass sheathed beside his ponderous sword; From the sign'd victims crops the curling hair;(121) The heralds part it, and the princes share; Then loudly thus before the attentive bands He calls the gods, and spreads his lifted hands: "O first and greatest power! whom all obey, Who high on Ida's holy mountain sway, Eternal Jove! and you bright orb...
    Book 3 (59% in)
  • On either side a sacred herald stands, The wine they mix, and on each monarch's hands Pour the full urn; then draws the Grecian lord His cutlass sheathed beside his ponderous sword; From the sign'd victims crops the curling hair;(121) The heralds part it, and the princes share; Then loudly thus before the attentive bands He calls the gods, and spreads his lifted hands: "O first and greatest power! whom all obey, Who high on Ida's holy mountain sway, Eternal Jove! and you bright orb...
    Book 3 (60% in)
  • Herald, be swift, and bid Machaon bring His speedy succour to the Spartan king; Pierced with a winged shaft (the deed of Troy), The Grecian's sorrow, and the Dardan's joy."
    Book 4 (38% in)
  • Priam sends a herald to make this offer, and to demand a truce for burning the dead, the last of which only is agreed to by Agamemnon.
    Book 7 (3% in)
  • This from the right to left the herald bears, Held out in order to the Grecian peers; Each to his rival yields the mark unknown, Till godlike Ajax finds the lot his own; Surveys the inscription with rejoicing eyes, Then casts before him, and with transport cries: "Warriors!
    Book 7 (41% in)
  • And now both heroes their broad falchions drew In flaming circles round their heads they flew; But then by heralds' voice the word was given.
    Book 7 (58% in)
  • And sage Idaeus on the part of Troy, Between the swords their peaceful sceptres rear'd; And first Idaeus' awful voice was heard: [Illustration: HECTOR AND AJAX SEPARATED BY THE HERALDS.
    Book 7 (60% in)
  • ] HECTOR AND AJAX SEPARATED BY THE HERALDS.
    Book 7 (60% in)
  • Then shall our herald, to the Atrides sent, Before their ships proclaim my son's intent.
    Book 7 (78% in)
  • Then thus the king of kings rejects the peace: "Herald! in him thou hear'st the voice of Greece For what remains; let funeral flames be fed With heroes' corps: I war not with the dead: Go search your slaughtered chiefs on yonder plain, And gratify the manes of the slain.
    Book 7 (84% in)
  • To sacred Troy, where all her princes lay To wait the event, the herald bent his way.
    Book 7 (85% in)
  • Now through the circuit of our Ilion wall, Let sacred heralds sound the solemn call; To bid the sires with hoary honours crown'd, And beardless youths, our battlements surround.
    Book 8 (91% in)
  • ...forth, A double tempest of the west and north Swells o'er the sea, from Thracia's frozen shore, Heaps waves on waves, and bids the AEgean roar: This way and that the boiling deeps are toss'd: Such various passions urged the troubled host, Great Agamemnon grieved above the rest; Superior sorrows swell'd his royal breast; Himself his orders to the heralds bears, To bid to council all the Grecian peers, But bid in whispers: these surround their chief, In solemn sadness and majestic grief.
    Book 9 (4% in)
  • The heralds bring The cleansing water from the living spring.
    Book 9 (29% in)
  • Such was his word: what further he declared, These sacred heralds and great Ajax heard.
    Book 9 (96% in)
  • A youth there was among the tribes of Troy, Dolon his name, Eumedes' only boy, (Five girls beside the reverend herald told.
    Book 10 (56% in)
  • Swift, at the word, the herald speeds along The lofty ramparts, through the martial throng, And finds the heroes bathed in sweat and gore, Opposed in combat on the dusty shore.
    Book 12 (75% in)
  • And now had Troy, by Greece compell'd to yield, Fled to her ramparts, and resign'd the field; Greece, in her native fortitude elate, With Jove averse, had turn'd the scale of fate: But Phoebus urged AEneas to the fight; He seem'd like aged Periphas to sight: (A herald in Anchises' love grown old, Revered for prudence, and with prudence bold.
    Book 17 (45% in)
  • ...train; The subject of debate, a townsman slain: One pleads the fine discharged, which one denied, And bade the public and the laws decide: The witness is produced on either hand: For this, or that, the partial people stand: The appointed heralds still the noisy bands, And form a ring, with sceptres in their hands: On seats of stone, within the sacred place,(254) The reverend elders nodded o'er the case; Alternate, each the attesting sceptre took, And rising solemn, each his sentence...
    Book 18 (82% in)
  • With that, his weapon deep inflicts the wound; The bleeding savage tumbles to the ground; The sacred herald rolls the victim slain (A feast for fish) into the foaming main.
    Book 19 (61% in)
  • The attending heralds, as by office bound, With kindled flames the tripod-vase surround: To cleanse his conquering hands from hostile gore, They urged in vain; the chief refused, and swore:(282) "No drop shall touch me, by almighty Jove!
    Book 23 (7% in)
  • Distinguish'd by his friend, his bosom glows With generous joy: then Menelaus rose; The herald placed the sceptre in his hands, And still'd the clamour of the shouting bands.
    Book 23 (62% in)
  • He sets forth in his chariot, with a waggon loaded with presents, under the charge of Idaeus the herald.
    Book 24 (1% in)
  • Alone the Ilian ramparts let him leave, And bear what stern Achilles may receive: Alone, for so we will; no Trojan near Except, to place the dead with decent care, Some aged herald, who with gentle hand May the slow mules and funeral car command.
    Book 24 (20% in)
  • Before the king Jove's messenger appears, And thus in whispers greets his trembling ears: "Fear not, O father! no ill news I bear; From Jove I come, Jove makes thee still his care; For Hector's sake these walls he bids thee leave, And bear what stern Achilles may receive; Alone, for so he wills; no Trojan near, Except, to place the dead with decent care, Some aged herald, who with gentle hand May the slow mules and funeral car command.
    Book 24 (24% in)
  • But the fair horses, long his darling care, Himself received, and harness'd to his car: Grieved as he was, he not this task denied; The hoary herald help'd him, at his side.
    Book 24 (36% in)
  • Now twilight veil'd the glaring face of day, And clad the dusky fields in sober grey; What time the herald and the hoary king (Their chariots stopping at the silver spring, That circling Ilus' ancient marble flows) Allow'd their mules and steeds a short repose, Through the dim shade the herald first espies A man's approach, and thus to Priam cries: "I mark some foe's advance: O king! beware; This hard adventure claims thy utmost care!
    Book 24 (44% in)
  • Now twilight veil'd the glaring face of day, And clad the dusky fields in sober grey; What time the herald and the hoary king (Their chariots stopping at the silver spring, That circling Ilus' ancient marble flows) Allow'd their mules and steeds a short repose, Through the dim shade the herald first espies A man's approach, and thus to Priam cries: "I mark some foe's advance: O king! beware; This hard adventure claims thy utmost care!
    Book 24 (44% in)
  • Thus having said, he vanish'd from his eyes, And in a moment shot into the skies: The king, confirm'd from heaven, alighted there, And left his aged herald on the car, With solemn pace through various rooms he went, And found Achilles in his inner tent: There sat the hero: Alcimus the brave, And great Automedon, attendance gave: These served his person at the royal feast; Around, at awful distance, stood the rest.
    Book 24 (58% in)
  • Achilles, like a lion, rush'd abroad: Automedon and Alcimus attend, (Whom most he honour'd, since he lost his friend,) These to unyoke the mules and horses went, And led the hoary herald to the tent; Next, heap'd on high, the numerous presents bear, (Great Hector's ransom,) from the polish'd car.
    Book 24 (72% in)
  • But in the porch the king and herald rest; Sad dreams of care yet wandering in their breast.
    Book 24 (83% in)
  • 60 The persons of heralds were held inviolable, and they were at liberty to travel whither they would without fear of molestation.
    Footnotes (19% in)

There are no more uses of "herald" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Pope).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
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