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assume
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

9 uses
  • Ulysses saw how dangerous such a display might be at such a moment; and artfully assuming (line 281) that the feeling was confined to Thersites alone (though in his subsequent speech, line 335, he admits and excuses the general discontent), he proceeds to cut short its expression by summary chastisement.
    Footnotes (30% in)
  • At Priam's gate, in solemn conclave met, Were gather'd all the Trojans, young and old: Swift Iris stood amidst them, and, the voice Assuming of Polites, Priam's son, The Trojan scout, who, trusting to his speed, Was posted on the summit of the mound Of ancient AEsuetes, there to watch Till from their ships the Grecian troops should march; His voice assuming, thus the Goddess spoke: "Old man, as erst in peace, so still thou lov'st The strife of words; but fearful war is nigh.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (88% in)
  • At Priam's gate, in solemn conclave met, Were gather'd all the Trojans, young and old: Swift Iris stood amidst them, and, the voice Assuming of Polites, Priam's son, The Trojan scout, who, trusting to his speed, Was posted on the summit of the mound Of ancient AEsuetes, there to watch Till from their ships the Grecian troops should march; His voice assuming, thus the Goddess spoke: "Old man, as erst in peace, so still thou lov'st The strife of words; but fearful war is nigh.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (89% in)
  • Neptune, concerned for the loss of the Grecians, upon seeing the fortification forced by Hector (who had entered the gate near the station of the Ajaces), assumes the shape of Calchas, and inspires those heroes to oppose him; then, in the form of one of the generals, encourages the other Greeks who had retired to their vessels.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (1% in)
  • ...the warrior King, Leaving a comrade, from the battle field, Wounded behind the knee, but newly brought; Borne by his comrades, to the leech's care He left him, eager to rejoin the fray; Whom by his tent th' Earth-shaking God address'd, The voice assuming of Andraemon's son, Who o'er th' AEtolians, as a God rever'd, In Pleuron reign'd, and lofty Calydon: "Where now, Idomeneus, sage Cretan chief, Are all the vaunting threats, so freely pour'd Against the Trojans by the sons of Greece?"
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (28% in)
  • Thus as he mus'd, beside him Phoebus stood, In likeness of a warrior stout and brave, Brother of Hecuba, the uncle thence Of noble Hector, Asius, Dymas' son; Who dwelt in Phrygia, by Saugarius' stream; His form assuming, thus Apollo spoke: "Hector, why shrink'st thou from the battle thus?
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (81% in)
  • To noble Menelaus, Atreus' son, Who close beside her stood, the Goddess first, The form of Phoenix and his pow'rful voice Assuming, thus her stirring words address'd: "On thee, O Menelaus, foul reproach Will fasten, if Achilles' faithful friend The dogs devour beneath the walls of Troy; Then hold thou firm, and all the host inspire."
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (70% in)
  • Apollo then, the spirit-stirring God, AEneas mov'd Achilles to confront, And fill'd with courage high; and thus, the voice Assuming of Lycaon, Priam's son, Apollo, son of Jove, the chief address'd: "AEneas, prince and councillor of Troy, Where are the vaunts, which o'er the wine-cup late Thou mad'st amid th' assembled chiefs of Troy, That hand to hand thou wouldst Achilles meet?"
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (15% in)
  • The Goddess left him there, and went (the form And voice assuming of Deiphobus) In search of godlike Hector; him she found, And standing near, with winged words address'd: "Sorely, good brother, hast thou been bested By fierce Achilles, who around the walls Hath chas'd thee with swift foot; now stand we both For mutual succour, and his onset wait."
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (42% in)

There are no more uses of "assume" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

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