toggle menu
menu
vocabulary
1000+ books
Go to Book

wrought
used in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward)

88 uses
  • About the margin of the massive shield Was wrought the mighty strength of th' ocean stream.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (95% in)
  • He woke from sleep; but o'er his senses spread Dwelt still the heavenly voice; he sat upright; He donn'd his vest of texture fine, new-wrought, Then o'er it threw his ample robe, and bound His sandals fair around his well-turn'd feet; And o'er his shoulders flung his sword, adorn'd With silver studs; and bearing in his hand His royal staff, ancestral, to the ships Where lay the brass-clad warriors, bent his way.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (5% in)
  • Then, when the sparrow's nestlings and herself The snake had swallowed, by the God, who first Sent him to light, a miracle was wrought: For Jove, the deep-designing Saturn's son, Turn'd him to stone; we stood, and wond'ring gaz'd.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (36% in)
  • ...The matchless son of Peleus, none might vie: But 'mid his beaked ocean-going ships He lay, with Agamemnon, Atreus' son, Indignant; while his troops upon the beach With quoits and jav'lins whil'd away the day, And feats of archery; their steeds the while The lotus-grass and marsh-grown parsley cropp'd, Each standing near their car; the well-wrought cars Lay all unheeded in the warriors' tents; They, inly pining for their godlike chief, Roam'd listless up and down, nor join'd the fray.
    1.2 — Volume 1 Book 2 (87% in)
  • But too forbearing are the men of Troy; Else for the ills that thou hast wrought the state, Ere now thy body had in stone been cas'd."
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (12% in)
  • Then o'er his shoulders fair-hair'd Helen's Lord, The godlike Paris, donn'd his armour bright: First on his legs the well-wrought greaves he fix'd, Fasten'd with silver clasps; his ample chest A breastplate guarded, by Lycaon lent, His brother, but which fitted well his form.
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (69% in)
  • Around his shoulders slung, his sword he bore, Brass-bladed, silver-studded; then his shield Weighty and strong; and on his firm-set head A helm he wore, well wrought, with horsehair plume That nodded, fearful, o'er his brow; his hand Grasp'd the firm spear, familiar to his hold.
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (71% in)
  • First Paris threw his weighty spear, and struck Fair in the midst Atrides' buckler round, But broke not through; upon the stubborn targe Was bent the lance's point; then thus to Jove, His weapon hurling, Menelaus pray'd: "Great King, on him who wrought me causeless wrong, On Paris, grant that retribution due My arm may bring; that men in days to come May fear their host to injure, and repay With treach'rous wile his hospitable cares."
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (73% in)
  • ...him down; Then went in search of Helen; her she found, Circled with Trojan dames, on Ilium's tow'r: Her by her airy robe the Goddess held, And in the likeness of an aged dame Who oft for her, in Sparta when she dwelt, Many a fair fleece had wrought, and lov'd her well, Address'd her thus: "Come, Helen, to thy house; Come, Paris calls thee; in his chamber he Expects thee, resting on luxurious couch, In costly garb, with manly beauty grac'd: Not from the fight of warriors wouldst thou...
    1.3 — Volume 1 Book 3 (82% in)
  • Straight he uncas'd his polish'd bow, his spoil Won from a mountain ibex, which himself, In ambush lurking, through the breast had shot, True to his aim, as from behind a crag He came in sight; prone on the rock he fell; With horns of sixteen palms his head was crown'd; These deftly wrought a skilful workman's hand, And polish'd smooth, and tipp'd the ends with gold.
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (19% in)
  • On the close-fitting belt the arrow struck; Right through the belt of curious workmanship It drove, and through the breastplate richly wrought, And through the coat of mail he wore beneath, His inmost guard and best defence to check The hostile weapons' force; yet onward still The arrow drove, and graz'd the hero's flesh.
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (24% in)
  • Then deeply groaning, Agamemnon spoke, As Menelaus by the hand he held, And with him groan'd his comrades: "Brother dear, I wrought thy death when late, on compact sworn, I sent thee forth alone for Greece to fight; Wounded by Trojans, who their plighted faith Have trodden under foot; but not in vain Are solemn cov'nants and the blood of lambs, The treaty wine outpoured, and hand-plight given, Wherein men place their trust; if not at once, Yet soon or late will Jove assert their claim;...
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (27% in)
  • The gage of battle in the midst she threw, Strode through the crowd, and woe to mortals wrought.
    1.4 — Volume 1 Book 4 (78% in)
  • Idaeus from the well-wrought chariot sprang, And fled, nor durst his brother's corpse defend.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (2% in)
  • Great Pluto's self the stinging arrow felt, When that same son of aegis-bearing Jove Assail'd him in the very gates of hell, And wrought him keenest anguish; pierc'd with pain To high Olympus, to the courts of Jove, Groaning, he came; the bitter shaft remain'd Deep in his shoulder fix'd, and griev'd his soul.
    1.5 — Volume 1 Book 5 (43% in)
  • Adrastus clasp'd his knees, and suppliant cried, "Spare me, great son of Atreus! for my life Accept a price; my wealthy father's house A goodly store contains of brass, and gold, And well-wrought iron; and of these he fain Would pay a noble ransom, could he hear That in the Grecian ships I yet surviv'd."
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (9% in)
  • Or that the many-dashing ocean's waves Had swept me off, ere all this woe were wrought!
    1.6 — Volume 1 Book 6 (62% in)
  • Be advis'd by me, For so 'twere better; cause we for today The rage of battle and of war to cease; To-morrow morn shall see the fight renew'd, Until the close of Ilium's destiny; For so ye Goddesses have wrought your will, That this fair city should in ruin fall."
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (7% in)
  • Ajax approach'd; before him, as a tow'r His mighty shield he bore, sev'n-fold, brass-bound, The work of Tychius, best artificer That wrought in leather; he in Hyla dwelt.
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (43% in)
  • Of sev'n-fold hides the pond'rous shield was wrought Of lusty bulls; the eighth was glitt'ring brass.
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (43% in)
  • ...The brazen cov'ring of the shield it struck, The outward fold, the eighth, above the sev'n Of tough bull's-hide; through six it drove its way With stubborn force; but in the seventh was stay'd, Then Ajax hurl'd in turn his pond'rous spear, And struck the circle true of Hector's shield; Right thro' the glitt'ring shield the stout spear pass'd, And thro' the well-wrought breastplate drove its way; And, underneath, the linen vest it tore; But Hector, stooping, shunn'd the stroke of death.
    1.7 — Volume 1 Book 7 (49% in)
  • Then fearful ruin had been wrought, and deeds Untold achiev'd, and like a flock of lambs, The adverse hosts been coop'd beneath the walls, Had not the Sire of Gods and men beheld, And with an awful peal of thunder hurl'd His vivid lightning down; the fiery bolt Before Tydides' chariot plough'd the ground.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (22% in)
  • To whom the Cloud-compeller thus replied: "Yet greater slaughter, stag-ey'd Queen of Heav'n, To-morrow shalt thou see, if so thou list, Wrought on the warrior Greeks by Saturn's son; For Hector's proud career shall not be check'd Until the wrath of Peleus' godlike son Beside the ships be kindled, in the day When round Patroclus' corpse, in narrow space, E'en by the vessels' sterns, the war shall rage.
    2.8 — Volume 2 Book 8 (80% in)
  • The other Gods their hecatombs receiv'd; Diana's shrine alone no off'rings deck'd, Neglected, or o'erlook'd; the sin was great; And in her wrath the arrow-darting Queen A savage wild-boar sent, with gleaming tusks, Which OEneus' vineyard haunting, wrought him harm.
    2.9 — Volume 2 Book 9 (74% in)
  • To Hector's off'rings most his soul inclines; For never have I seen, or heard men tell, How in one day one man has wrought such loss As Hector, dear to Jove, yet not the son Of God or Goddess, on the Greeks has wrought.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (8% in)
  • To Hector's off'rings most his soul inclines; For never have I seen, or heard men tell, How in one day one man has wrought such loss As Hector, dear to Jove, yet not the son Of God or Goddess, on the Greeks has wrought.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (8% in)
  • His brother thus with counsels wise dismiss'd, The King to aged Nestor took his way: Him by his tent and dark-ribb'd ship he found On a soft couch; beside him lay his arms, His shield, two lances, and a glitt'ring helm: There lay the rich-wrought belt the old man wore, When to the battle, arm'd, he led his troops; For nought to age's weakness would he yield.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (12% in)
  • Stretch'd on a wild bull's hide the chief repos'd, A gay-wrought carpet roll'd beneath his head.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (26% in)
  • A bow, and well-fill'd quiver, and a sword, Meriones to sage Ulysses gave; And on his brows a leathern headpiece plac'd, Well wrought within, with num'rous straps secur'd, And on th' outside, with wild boars' gleaming tusks Profusely garnish'd, scatter'd here and there By skilful hand; the midst with felt was lin'd; This from Amyntor, son of Ormenus, Autolycus from Eleon bore away, Spoil of his pillag'd house; Autolycus Gave to Amphidamas, Cytheran chief, Who in Scandea dwelt;...
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (43% in)
  • Smooth was the message which to Thebes he bore; But great, his mission ended, were the deeds That with thine aid he wrought; for, Goddess, thou Wast with him, and thine arm was his defence: So be thou now with me, and me defend.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (48% in)
  • Sudden he stopp'd, with panic paralys'd: His teeth all chatt'ring, pale with fear he stood, With falt'ring accents; panting, they came up And seiz'd him in their grasp; he thus, in tears: "Spare but my life; my life I can redeem; For ample stores I have of gold, and brass, And well-wrought iron; and of these my sire Would pay a gen'rous ransom, could he learn That in the Grecian ships I yet surviv'd."
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (63% in)
  • With gold and silver is his chariot wrought, His armour golden, of gigantic size, A marvel to behold! it seems not meet For mortal man, but for th' immortal Gods.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (72% in)
  • ...fill'd, the Trojan camp he sought; And Rhesus' kinsman, good Hippocoon, The Thracian councillor, from sleep arous'd; Awaking, when the vacant space he view'd, Where late had stood the horses; and his friends Gasping in death, and welt'ring in their blood, He groan'd as on his comrade's name he call'd: Then loud the clamour rose, and wild uproar, Unspeakable, of Trojans thronging round; They marvell'd at the deeds; but marvell'd more How they who wrought them had escap'd unscath'd.
    2.10 — Volume 2 Book 10 (86% in)
  • First on his legs the well-wrought greaves he fix'd, Fasten'd with silver clasps; his ample chest A breastplate guarded, giv'n by Cinyras In pledge of friendship; for in Cyprus' isle He heard the rumour of the glorious fleet About to sail for Troy; and sought with gifts To win the favour of the mighty King.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (2% in)
  • ...upwards tow'rds the neck Their length extended, three on either side: In colour like the bow, which Saturn's son Plac'd in the clouds, a sign to mortal men: Then o'er his shoulder threw his sword; bright flash'd The golden studs; the silver scabbard shone, With golden baldrick fitted; next his shield He took, full-siz'd, well-wrought, well-prov'd in fight; Around it ran ten circling rims of brass; With twenty bosses round of burnish'd tin, And, in the centre, one of dusky bronze.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (3% in)
  • A Gorgon's head, with aspect terrible, Was wrought, with Fear and Flight encircled round: Depending from a silver belt it hung; And on the belt a dragon, wrought in bronze, Twin'd his lithe folds, and turn'd on ev'ry side, Sprung from a single neck, his triple head.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (4% in)
  • A Gorgon's head, with aspect terrible, Was wrought, with Fear and Flight encircled round: Depending from a silver belt it hung; And on the belt a dragon, wrought in bronze, Twin'd his lithe folds, and turn'd on ev'ry side, Sprung from a single neck, his triple head.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (4% in)
  • ...Of Helen to her Lord), the King assail'd; Both on one car; but from their hands had dropp'd The broider'd reins; bewilder'd there they stood; While, with a lion's bound, upon them sprang The son of Atreus; suppliant, in the car, They clasp'd his knees; "Give quarter, Atreus' son, Redeem our lives; our sire Antimachus Possesses goodly store of brass and gold, And well-wrought iron; and of these he fain Would pay a noble ransom, could he hear That in the Grecian ships we yet surviv'd."
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (15% in)
  • He said, and on the shield's broad circle struck: Through the bright shield the sturdy weapon drove, And through the rich-wrought baldrick, from the ribs Tearing the flesh away; but Pallas seiz'd, And turn'd it from the vital parts aside.
    2.11 — Volume 2 Book 11 (51% in)
  • Nor yet the Trojans, though by Hector led, The gates had broken, and the massive bar, But Jove against the Greeks sent forth his son Sarpedon, as a lion on a herd: His shield's broad orb before his breast he bore, Well-wrought, of beaten brass, which th' arm'rer's hand Had beaten out, and lin'd with stout bull's-hide; With golden rods, continuous, all around; He thus equipp'd, two jav'lins brandishing, Strode onward, as a lion, mountain-bred, Whom, fasting long, his dauntless courage...
    2.12 — Volume 2 Book 12 (61% in)
  • ...an oak, or poplar tall, Or lofty pine, which on the mountain top, For some proud ship, the woodman's axe hath hewn: So he, before the car and horses stretch'd, His death-cry utt'ring, clutch'd the blood-stain'd soil; Bewilder'd, helpless, stood his charioteer; Nor dar'd, escaping from the foemen's hands, To turn his horses: him, Antilochus Beneath the waistband struck; nor aught avail'd His brazen breastplate; through the middle thrust, He, from the well-wrought chariot, gasping, fell.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (48% in)
  • On, like a vulture, sprang Meriones, And from his arm the sturdy spear withdrew; Then backward leap'd amid his comrades' ranks; While round his brother's waist Polites threw His arms, and led him from the battle-field To where, with charioteer and rich-wrought car, Beyond the fight, his flying coursers stood.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (63% in)
  • But from the side of Ajax Telamon Stirr'd not a whit Oileus' active son; But as on fallow-land with one accord, Two dark-red oxen drag the well-wrought plough, Streaming with sweat that gathers round their horns; They by the polish'd yoke together held, The stiff soil cleaving, down the furrow strain; So closely, side by side, those two advanc'd.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (82% in)
  • Wrought on his brother's mind the hero's words: Together both they bent their steps, where rag'd The fiercest conflict; there Cebriones, Phalces, Orthaeus, brave Polydamas, Palmys, and godlike Polyphetes' might, And Morys, and Ascanius fought; these two Hippotion's sons; from rich Ascania's plains They, as reliefs, but yestermorn had come; Impell'd by Jove, they sought the battle field.
    2.13 — Volume 2 Book 13 (91% in)
  • He said, and from the wall a buckler took, Well-wrought, with brass resplendent, which his son, Brave Thrasymedes, in the tent had left, While with his father's shield himself was girt; A sturdy spear too, tipp'd with brass, he took: Without the tent he stood; and there his eyes A woful sight beheld; the Greeks in flight, The haughty Trojans pressing on their rout Confus'd; the Greeks' protecting wall o'erthrown.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (2% in)
  • A robe ambrosial then, by Pallas wrought, She donn'd, in many a curious pattern trac'd, With golden brooch beneath her breast confin'd.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (33% in)
  • Then o'er her head th' imperial Goddess threw A beauteous veil, new-wrought, as sunlight white; And on her well-turn'd feet her sandals bound.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (34% in)
  • Thus Venus spoke; and from her bosom loos'd Her broider'd cestus, wrought with ev'ry charm To win the heart; there Love, there young Desire, There fond Discourse, and there Persuasion dwelt, Which oft enthralls the mind of wisest men.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (39% in)
  • Nor did the rest not aid; their shields' broad orbs Before him still they held, while in their arms His comrades bore him from the battle-field, To where, with charioteer and well-wrought car, Beyond the fight, his flying coursers stood, Which bore him, deeply groaning, tow'rd the town.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (79% in)
  • But chiefest slaughter of the Trojans wrought Oileus' active son; of all the Greeks No foot so swift as his, when Jove had fill'd Their souls with fear, to chase the flying foe.
    2.14 — Volume 2 Book 14 (96% in)
  • "Thus Ajax spoke; and Teucer in the tent Bestowed his bow, and o'er his shoulders threw His fourfold shield; and on his firm-set head A helm he plac'd, well-wrought, with horsehair plume, That nodded, fearful, o'er his brow; his hand Grasp'd the firm spear, with sharpen'd point of brass: Then ran, and swiftly stood by Ajax' side.
    2.15 — Volume 2 Book 15 (63% in)
  • Such converse held they; while by hostile spears Hard press'd, no longer Ajax might endure; At once by Jove's high will and Trojan foes O'ermaster'd; loud beneath repeated blows Clatter'd around his brow the glitt'ring helm, As on the well-wrought crest the weapons fell; And his left arm grew faint, that long had borne The burthen of his shield; yet nought avail'd The press of spears to drive him from his post; Lab'ring he drew his breath, his ev'ry limb With sweat was reeking;...
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (12% in)
  • He said: his dazzling arms Patroclus donn'd: First on his legs the well-wrought greaves he fix'd, Fasten'd with silver clasps; his ample chest The breastplate of Achilles, swift of foot, Star-spangled, richly wrought, defended well; Around his shoulders slung, his sword he bore, Brass-bladed, silver-studded; next his shield Weighty and strong; and on his firm-set head A helm he wore, well-wrought, with horsehair plume That nodded, fearful, o'er his brow; his hand Grasp'd two stout...
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (15% in)
  • He said: his dazzling arms Patroclus donn'd: First on his legs the well-wrought greaves he fix'd, Fasten'd with silver clasps; his ample chest The breastplate of Achilles, swift of foot, Star-spangled, richly wrought, defended well; Around his shoulders slung, his sword he bore, Brass-bladed, silver-studded; next his shield Weighty and strong; and on his firm-set head A helm he wore, well-wrought, with horsehair plume That nodded, fearful, o'er his brow; his hand Grasp'd two stout...
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (15% in)
  • ...Patroclus donn'd: First on his legs the well-wrought greaves he fix'd, Fasten'd with silver clasps; his ample chest The breastplate of Achilles, swift of foot, Star-spangled, richly wrought, defended well; Around his shoulders slung, his sword he bore, Brass-bladed, silver-studded; next his shield Weighty and strong; and on his firm-set head A helm he wore, well-wrought, with horsehair plume That nodded, fearful, o'er his brow; his hand Grasp'd two stout spears, familiar to his hold.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (16% in)
  • Achilles then within his tent withdrew, And of a gorgeous coffer rais'd the lid, Well-wrought, by silver-footed Thetis plac'd On board his ship, and fill'd with rich attire, With store of wind-proof cloaks, and carpets soft.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (25% in)
  • I will myself this chief confront, and learn Who this may be of bearing proud and high, Who on the Trojans grievous harm hath wrought, And many a warrior's limbs relax'd in death."
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (48% in)
  • Full on his temples fell the jagged mass, Drove both his eyebrows in, and crush'd the bone; Before him in the dust his eyeballs fell; And, like a diver, from the well-wrought car Headlong he plung'd; and life forsook his limbs.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (84% in)
  • O'er whom Patroclus thus with bitter jest: "Heav'n! what agility! how deftly thrown That somersault! if only in the sea Such feats he wrought, with him might few compete, Diving for oysters, if with such a plunge He left his boat, how rough soe'er the waves, As from his car he plunges to the ground: Troy can, it seems, accomplish'd tumblers boast."
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (84% in)
  • To whom Patroclus thus in accents faint: "Hector, thou boastest loudly now, that Jove, With Phoebus join'd, hath thee with vict'ry crown'd: They wrought my death, who stripp'd me of my arms.
    2.16 — Volume 2 Book 16 (95% in)
  • Yet shall not ye, nor shall your well-wrought car, By Hector, son of Priam, be controll'd; I will not suffer it; enough for him To hold, with vaunting boast, Achilles' arms; But to your limbs and spirits will I impart Such strength, that from the battle to the ships Ye shall in safety bear Automedon; For yet I will the Trojans shall prevail, And slay, until they reach the well-mann'd ships, Till sets the sun, and darkness shrouds the earth."
    2.17 — Volume 2 Book 17 (56% in)
  • But thou, engage not in the toils of war, Until thine eyes again behold me here; For with to-morrow's sun will I return With arms of heav'nly mould, by Vulcan wrought."
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (21% in)
  • My arms are with the Trojans; and to boot My mother warn'd me not to arm for fight, Till I again should see her; for she hop'd To bring me heav'nly arms by Vulcan wrought: Nor know I well whose armour I could wear, Save the broad shield of Ajax Telamon And he, methinks, amid the foremost ranks Ev'n now is fighting o'er Patroclus' corpse."
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (29% in)
  • Him swelt'ring at his forge she found, intent On forming twenty tripods, which should stand The wall surrounding of his well-built house; With golden wheels beneath he furnish'd each, And to th' assembly of the Gods endued With pow'r to move spontaneous, and return, A marvel to behold! thus far his work He had completed; but not yet had fix'd The rich-wrought handles; these his labour now Engag'd, to fit them, and to rivet fast.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (58% in)
  • Thus, as she spoke, the Goddess led her in, And on a seat with silver studs adorn'd, Fair, richly wrought, a footstool at her feet, She bade her sit; then thus to Vulcan call'd: "Haste hither, Vulcan; Thetis asks thine aid."
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (59% in)
  • He donn'd his robe, and took his weighty staff; Then through the door with halting step he pass'd; There waited on their King the attendant maids; In form as living maids, but wrought in gold; Instinct with consciousness, with voice endued, And strength, and skill from heav'nly teachers drawn.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (64% in)
  • Therefore a suppliant to thy knees I come, If to my son, to early death condemn'd, Thou wilt accord the boon of shield and helm, And well-wrought greaves with silver clasps secur'd, And breastplate; for his own, his faithful friend, By Trojan hands subdued, hath lost; and he, O'erwhelm'd with grief, lies prostrate on the earth."
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (71% in)
  • And first a shield he fashion'd, vast and strong, With rich adornment; circled with a rim, Threefold, bright-gleaming, whence a silver belt Depended; of five folds the shield was form'd; And on its surface many a rare design Of curious art his practis'd skill had wrought.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (75% in)
  • The terms rejecting, the defenders mann'd A secret ambush; on the walls they plac'd Women and children muster'd for defence, And men by age enfeebled; forth they went, By Mars and Pallas led; these, wrought in gold, In golden arms array'd, above the crowd For beauty and stature, as befitting Gods, Conspicuous shone; of lesser height the rest.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (80% in)
  • And still behind them darker show'd the soil, The true presentment of a new-plough'd field, Though wrought in gold; a miracle of art.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (86% in)
  • And, with rich clusters laden, there was grav'n A vineyard fair, all gold; of glossy black The bunches were, on silver poles sustain'd; Around, a darksome trench; beyond, a fence Was wrought, of shining tin; and through it led One only path, by which the bearers pass'd, Who gather'd in the vineyard's bounteous store.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (88% in)
  • Of straight-horn'd cattle too a herd was grav'n; Of gold and tin the heifers all were wrought: They to the pasture, from the cattle-yard, With gentle lowings, by a babbling stream, Where quiv'ring reed-beds rustled, slowly mov'd.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (90% in)
  • There, too, the skilful artist's hand had wrought With curious workmanship, a mazy dance, Like that which Daedalus in Cnossus erst At fair-hair'd Ariadne's bidding fram'd.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (92% in)
  • The shield completed, vast and strong, he forg'd A breastplate, dazzling bright as flame of fire; And next, a weighty helmet for his head, Fair, richly wrought, with crest of gold above; Then last, well-fitting greaves of pliant tin.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (96% in)
  • The skill'd artificer his works complete Before Achilles' Goddess-mother laid: She, like a falcon, from the snow-clad heights Of huge Olympus, darted swiftly down, Charg'd with the glitt'ring arms by Vulcan wrought.
    2.18 — Volume 2 Book 18 (96% in)
  • First on his legs the well-wrought greaves he fix'd, Fasten'd with silver clasps; his breastplate next Around his chest; and o'er his shoulders flung His silver-studded sword, with blade of brass; Then took his vast and weighty shield, whence gleam'd A light refulgent as the full-orb'd moon; Or as to seamen o'er the wave is borne The watchfire's light, which, high among the hills, Some shepherd kindles in his lonely fold: As they, reluctant, by the stormy winds, Far from their friends...
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (84% in)
  • ...Around his chest; and o'er his shoulders flung His silver-studded sword, with blade of brass; Then took his vast and weighty shield, whence gleam'd A light refulgent as the full-orb'd moon; Or as to seamen o'er the wave is borne The watchfire's light, which, high among the hills, Some shepherd kindles in his lonely fold: As they, reluctant, by the stormy winds, Far from their friends are o'er the waters driv'n; So from Achilles' shield, bright, richly wrought, The light was thrown.
    2.19 — Volume 2 Book 19 (86% in)
  • So broke not through AEneas' sturdy spear, Stay'd by the golden plate, the gift of Heav'n; Yet through two plates it pass'd, but three remain'd, For five were in the shield by Vulcan wrought; Two were of brass, the inner two of tin, And one of gold, which stay'd the brazen spear.
    2.20 — Volume 2 Book 20 (51% in)
  • Thersilochus and Mydon then he slew, Mnesus and Thrasius and Astypylus, AEnius and Ophelestes; and yet more Had been the slaughter by Achilles wrought, But from his eddying depths, in human form, With wrathful tone the mighty River spoke: "In strength, Achilles, and in deeds of arms, All mortals thou surpassest; for the Gods Themselves attend thee, and protect from harm; If Saturn's son have given thee utterly The Trojans to destroy, yet, ere thou slay, Far from my waters drive them...
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (33% in)
  • As in a city, which the Gods in wrath Have fir'd, whose volleying smoke ascends to Heav'n, On all her people grievous toil is cast, On many, harm and loss; such toil, such loss Achilles wrought amid the Trojan host.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (83% in)
  • He said, and threw with stalwart hand the spear; Achilles' leg he struck, below the knee, Nor miss'd his aim; and loudly rang the greaves Of new-wrought tin; but back the brazen point Rebounded, nor the heav'nly armour pierc'd.
    2.21 — Volume 2 Book 21 (93% in)
  • One with hot current flows, and from beneath, As from a furnace, clouds of steam arise; 'Mid summer's heat the other rises cold As hail, or snow, or water crystalliz'd; Beside the fountains stood the washing-troughs Of well-wrought stone, where erst the wives of Troy And daughters fair their choicest garments wash'd, In peaceful times, ere came the sons of Greece.
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (29% in)
  • Achilles' wrath was rous'd: with fury wild His soul was fill'd: before his breast he bore His well-wrought shield; and fiercely on his brow Nodded the four-plum'd helm, as on the breeze Floated the golden hairs, with which the crest By Vulcan's hand was thickly interlac'd; And as amid the stars' unnumber'd host, When twilight yields to night, one star appears, Hesper, the brightest star that shines in Heav'n, Gleam'd the sharp-pointed lance, which in his right Achilles pois'd, on...
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (58% in)
  • ...of Peleus, swift of foot, Had stripp'd the armour from the corpse, he rose, And, standing, thus th' assembled Greeks address'd: "O friends, the chiefs and councillors of Greece, Since Heav'n hath granted us this man to slay, Whose single arm hath wrought us more of ill Than all the rest combin'd, advance we now Before the city in arms, and trial make What is the mind of Troy; if, Hector slain, They from the citadel intend retreat, Or still, despite their loss, their ground maintain.
    2.22 — Volume 2 Book 22 (71% in)
  • Creak'd their backbones beneath the tug and strain Of those strong arms; their sweat pour'd down like rain; And bloody weals of livid purple hue Their sides and shoulders streak'd, as sternly they For vict'ry and the well-wrought tripod strove.
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (78% in)
  • ...won; Then rose, and loudly to the Greeks proclaim'd: "For these we call upon two champions brave To don their arms, their sharp-edg'd weapons grasp, And public trial of their prowess make; And he who first his rival's flesh shall reach, And, through his armour piercing, first draw blood, He shall this silver-studded sword receive, My trophy from Asteropaeus won, Well-wrought, of Thracian metal; but the arms In common property they both shall hold, And in my tent a noble banquet share."
    2.23 — Volume 2 Book 23 (88% in)
  • He said; they quail'd beneath their father's wrath, And brought the smoothly-running mule-wain out, Well-fram'd, new-built; and fix'd the wicker seat; Then from the peg the mule-yoke down they took, Of boxwood wrought, with boss and rings complete; And with the yoke, the yoke-band brought they forth, Nine cubits long; and to the polish'd pole At the far end attach'd; the breast-rings then Fix'd to the pole-piece: and on either side Thrice round the knob the leathern thong they wound.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (34% in)
  • Thus as he spoke, obedient to his word They stood aside, and for the car made way: But when to Priam's lordly house they came, They laid him on a rich-wrought couch, and call'd The minstrels in, who by the hero's bed Should lead the melancholy chorus; they Pour'd forth the music of the mournful dirge, While women's voices join'd in loud lament.
    2.24 — Volume 2 Book 24 (89% in)

There are no more uses of "wrought" in The Iliad by Homer - (translated by: Edward).

Typical Usage  (best examples)
Dictionary / pronunciation — Google®Dictionary list — Onelook.com®